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Full text of "Thief River Falls (MN) Tribune"


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Title: . 


1 

Thief River Falls) TRIBU1 

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•20:33 r 20:8.6. • 


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40- 


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10-1982 


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Indus i 
Datos: 


ITS 


Jul 2 :| De< 

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31 ' 




- ' 


1920 15 


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Originals held by: MHS _x_ Other 


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Prepared by: 

'"N. Owens 


Date: 

Oct 2, 1982 

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Filmed by: 


Date: V, 


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VOL.20 No. 33 



NOW IS 



TIME 



A 



TO PUTINS* 




.a 



mm 



TRIBUNE e^HPAIGN MAKING 
- RAPID HEADWAY AND 
WORKERS BUSY 



II a man 



i ne to you today and 
said, "For the ! ext four weeks I will 
pay you two In udred dollars a week, 
flor your services in my work" — 
■would you accept his offer.? Ten to 



one, you would- 



-and you'd go farther 



our career, in an at- 
earn the large salary 



and make those four weeks t,he bus- 
iest weeks of ; 
tempt to fully 
f paid you. 

The Tribune will pay to somft 
wide-awake man or women living in 
or near Thief River Falls four hun- 
dred and fifty jlollr.rs a week for the 
nest four weeks — -will give away on 



THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY, JULY 2, 1920 



Official Paper of 'Pennington County 



Enjoys New Potatoes 



Hr. 6( rdon Olson, west of 
town on the Jefferson high- 
way rop< rts fine, new pota- 
toes on bis table June 20th. 
In the garden cabbage with 
leaves four feet across, fin- 
est tame! grass crop he has 
ever raised, .with oats ex- 
cellent and corn more than 
knee high. Old Pennington 
■ is going oier tne top again 
this year. Good farmers, 
like Mr. 



July .31st a Buick 
•worth eighteen I 



'.Six" touring 



ear, 
hundred dollars. And 
you have as 1111 oh chance to win that 
car as anyone. You have a great 
store of determination and persever- 
ance — your 11 ability is as great and 



your circle of 
you can win. 

You have jn 
win the Buick 



friends as large — and 



■ 1 as much chance to 
"Six" as any worker 



now in the race. What if you have 



V 



done but little 
other rival 



r So far. only 
have ilone inu 
jorily of tliosi 
ulnjririjiir aluii 
How of work 

. u winning, v 
not one workiji 



Olson, are 'tlie big- 
gest resource our country pos 
s esses, 
country 



\\\e are proud of our 
and we are more 
proutl of our good farmers 



RECEIVES 
LARGE SUM 
IN VERDICT 



FRED BRENDECKE GETS $11,000 
VERDICT IN CASE AGAINST 
RAILROAJ^ • 



I 



work so far— -what if 
far; in (he lead — 
vhjft if you ftal that your territory 
is jiot as larjri' or as productive as 
those of other workers? <"!o in ami 
•work with all. your mijrht — and 
there's not a ojie of t(ie workers who i 
can beat 

three or four workers 
■h real work — the ma 
who entered are just 
. keeping up a steady 
hut not uceumulatin 
„ i strength. There's- 
entered wlio cannot 
be beaten. Vim can start work for 
subscriptions today — you can keep 
your friends behind you and keep 
them working for you — you can get 
• your publicity and your personal' ad- 
vertising developed to such a pitch 
as to bring o your support every 
friend and neighbor in miles — and 
can win the c'ar- — if you want to. 

All you neeh to do is to start work 
for subscript ions 'today. The Tribune 
will proyido you wiui a sample copy 
of the Farm Account book when has 
" been secured to be offered with sub- 
scriptions to (The Tribute, and this 
book will help ;you a great deal. You 
may give the book free with three 
and live y.eaf"' subscriptions — which 
meivns that you will secure a. ilarge 
number of the long-term subscrip- 
tions and tfnis a . large amount of 
votes — and it can be given for $1.5u 
.— - plus the cost of the subscription with 
one year subscrptiohs. Your photo- 
graph will be published in The Tri- 
bune with |an advertisement appeal- 
ing for the hilp of yrour friends, free 
of charge; circular letters asking for 
subafcriprifcn:- will be furnished in 
any number you may order — in fact, 
the manager lent of the automobile 
campaign will do everything that is 
fair and square to help you win. 

AH that you will be asked to do 
is to do the best work possible for 
subscriptions. And now is the time 
to do that w irk. 

Get- starti d today — work hard — 
keep going a I the time — and win the 
.Buick ''Six" on July 31st. 
■ - "ilnfte it i hot one" ! ! ! 



MIGHTY FINE 
CROP FUTURE 
IS ASSURED 



COUNTY NOW IN FIRST CLASS 

'CONDITION AND CROPS 

LOOK FINE 



Married Wednesday 
The home of J. B. Conner was the 
scene of a v< ry pretty home wedding 
ou the afteri oon of June 3pth, -when 
Miss Stella Conner was united in 
marriage to Otto Haack Jr., of Oak 
Park, Gryglp. After' the marriage 
ceremony w lich was conducted by 
Rev. J. B. Smith, of the Methodist 
church, a sumptuous repast was en- 
joyed by the many guests who en- 
livened the iccasiou by their hearty, 
congratiilatiins. The wedding party 
motored to Grygla where Mr. and Mrs. 
Haack will make their future lime. 
Miss .Conner has a host of friends 
In the city ^ho will follow her with 
their best wishes for a long and pros- 
perous life journey. 

CITY PRINTERS 
ARE NOW ON 
UNION BASIS 



A verdict of $11,000 damages in 
favor of the plaintiff was. returned 
by the jury in district court in the 
case of Fred Brendecke vs. the United 
States Railroad Administration, last 
Wednesday night. 

Brendecke bad brought suit for 
the sum of $40,000 alleging that 
the loss of his foot in an accident on 
October 24, 1918, was due to de- 
fective equipment. Plaintiff alleged 
that ■ whi'.e firing an engine in the 
Great Northern yards he stepped from 
the cab, and, ou attempting to re- 
ei/ter. slipped on a defective step, 
catching his foot beneath the front 
wheel of the tender, where it was. 
so badly crushed that amputation 
was necessary. 

The case occupied nearly two days, 
the taking of testimony being com- 
pleted Wednesday afternoon. The 
jury was out only a short time, and 



Conditions generally in Minnesota 
and' particularly Pennington county 
are excellent with reference to the 
crop outlook. A . drive thru the 
country these days is well worth the 
time spent and in .making such a trip 
it is very noticeable that the condi- 
tions are as good as they have been 
for a bumper cum was never better. 
Especially is this true of small grain. 



I southern Minnesota. '*If the present 
| climatic conditions hold, there is ev- ■ 
evy indication -of the largest crop in 
I years thru the entire Northwest." j 
The labor situation will not cause : 
trouble in harvesting this year, ac- 
cording to Mr. Jennings, who bases J 
his prediction on the fact that seed- \ 
ing was two weeks late in the North- ! 
west. | 

"Witli farmers offering from So to ; 
$7 a day and board for laborers, I I 
anticipate uo trouble getting an ade- j 
quate supply of men to all of the' 
Northwest. Harvesting is nearly com. 
plete in Oklahoma, Texas, and other ! 
soutffern districts. By the time grains | 
are ripe here, the men in that section 
will 



RESULTS OF - 
N. DAKOTA 
PRIMARIES 



LATE DISPATCHES FROM GRAND 

FORKS- SHOWS TREND OF 

VOTE IN THAT STATE 



Tlie primary 'election of North Da- 
move thru this' country in-large ! kota which was held on June 30th 



numbers. 

Minnesota farmers have sent in of- 
fers of from $3 to §G a day, although 
there will' be no general demand un- 
til the inlying season opens, he said.. 

TI'.l- Van Dusen-Harringtoii crop re- 
•port .says that in the Northwest the 
weather has been fairly warm, with 
plenty of rain for the places that 



The cool weather with just the prop- j need it. Montana getting a specially' 
er amount of rainfall has helped ma- heavy- precipitation. Pastures ana 



terially in bringing the small grain i g 



grain fields that, a year, ago were 



said to be growing 



to the front and from every indica- burned out. are 

Hon and in conversation with farm- j splendidly. • 

ers ;geuerallv the county over, it is I Corn is reported in fine,condition. 

easy to see the vear holds forth bright i in spite of considerable rain. Seed 

promises in the way of good crops. | this year is said to have been excep- 



Travel.ers in this state and the Da- 
kotas pronounce" the crops to b<= 
equally as good in other sections as 
they are in this county. A great 



tionally good; 



.eturned a sealed verdict which was i many have stated that so far as they 
read on the opening, of court at 9 ! are able to, judge the' entire, north- 



The print 



o'clock Thursday morning. 

Attorneys for tlie' plaintiff were 
Sam A. Anderson, of Minneapolis, 
and Hans Clioinmie of this city. Rep- 
resentatives for the administration 
were A. L. Janes, flreat Northern 
railroad counsel, and E. M. Stanton, 
o£ this city. _ 



UNION OF PRINTERS ORGANIZA- 
TION STARTS YESTERDAY 
MORNING / 



MUSIC 



?> 



COMPANY 
NOW LOCATED 
^IN NEW HOME 



\- 



SECURE BUILDING ON THIRD 
STREE, DIRECTLY OPPO- 
SITE FORMER LOCATION 



The Thief River Music Company 
are now located in their new home at 
Third street, directly opposite their 
former location. They have been lO' 

' «ated temporarily in ". the Meehnn 
' !bloek at the corner of Second end 
- Main streets. Since the reorganiza- 
tion of the company, they have en- 
joyed a nice increase in business and 
with the new location they are irvy 
taiu to liiry'e a very pronounced .in- 
crease. The former location, at Sec- 
ond and Main .was a tftfle small r, r 
the display! of niercnandise and the 
company wis seriously hampered for 
room. Thejy now: have a very fine 
store and yjhile they could use more 
room they jare in better shape than 
they have been for some time past 
They have, installed demonstration 

— booths, in the new quarters for the 
testing. and demonstrating of phono 
graphs arid all musical instruments: 
The interior of -the building is fln 
ished in .wjiite ivory enamel and it 
surely presents a neat and inviting 
- .appearance. 



of the city have form- 
ed an organization and the same is 
now in force. The rules of the new 
organization call for an eight hour 
day with i lcreased pay all around. 
The men h tve secured their charter 
from the I iternational headquarters 
at Indiauap >lis, Indiana, and are now 
a full fledgMl organization, receiving 
and partici mtiug in ail the benefits 
of the Iuiernatipnl Typographical 
Union. 

The forming of this organization 
means that all printing done in this 
city henceforth will be done by un- 
ion printer: aud the union Tabel will 
be used on all printing. The labels 
have not . y it arrived from Indianap- 
olis but wi 1 no doubt be here in the 
course of s few days. It is the in- 
tention of the men to Ave up to all 
the rules- mil regulations of the 
union and this they will do without 
question. '1 lie printer's union, so far 
as we blue been able to judge in 
our years 3f experience, is without 
doubt one of the most sincere and 
square or. ionizations ill America. 
Never in tlie history of the organiza- 
tion has ttijerc been trouble but what 
it was settled in an amiable manner 
and without loss of time, generally, 
ami with no ill feeling in any case. 
Everything}' is argued on a sane basis 
and the ijrinter considers the. em- 
ployer's JiUe the same as he does 
his own, which no doubt accounts for 
the fact that there- is seldom or'ne'ver 
a walk-out} among printers. 

The Tribune is strongly in favor 
of this organization and was the first 
to sign the ^agreement .when' it was 
presented by the printers of this city. 
We believe in organized labor, first, 
last, and always, aud are with them 
in everything that is fair and above 
board. Organized labor is entitled to 
consideration and. recognition and The 
Tribune is proud, to announce that 
this office is manned by union print- 
ers. We are for them and will' do 
all that is possible to' uphold the 
principles 'of the International Typo- 
graphical ' Jnion. 



Building Many Silos 

The Rambeck-Stono company art 
erecting many new siVos in the im- 
mediate vicinity of Thief River Falls; 
tlie first to be erected is on the farm 
of E. O. Green, northwest of town. 
The silo being erected on Mr.. Green's 
farm is .of concrete and is ISO -tons 
capacity. The sifos are made by a 
firm at Shelilld, Iowa, and molds for , »f a 
the casting of the cement blocks are ' other crop: 
sent to the Ranibeek-Stone company A repor 
at this place, who cast the. blocks 
and erect the silo complete. Tliejy 
are claimed to be one of the best on 
the market and to date they have' 
several orders signed up for the erec- 
tion of these silos. P. W. Roark isj h 
hauling put the material for the erec- 
tion of a silo on his' place north ot 
town and when completed it will be 
a mighty valuable addition to his 
farui. The farmers of the county are 
coming more and more to see the 
benefits of a silo and ere long it will 
be a familiar sigbt to see a sifo on 
practically every farm in the entire 
county. They are a fine addition to 
any farm and mean much in the 
raising of- stock. 



west is in very fine condition and 
prospects for bumper crops never 
looked brighter. This is specially 
truo in Pennington county, we know, 
and we are sure that the farmers of 
this section, by their painstaking ef- 
fort to attend the crops in the time 
they needed attention most are^ 
ccive handsome returns 'U 
labor this year. 

The potato crop looks very 
and it seems as if the cost of pota- 
toes are; to be forced down in the 
very near future. It is claimed that 
potatoes are running as good as the 
average years and from all . the re- 
ports possible to gather, it -would 
seem as if there was a possibility 
ood potato crop along .with 



good 



MERCHANTS 
ASSOCIATION 
PLANS MEET 



EFFORTS NOW BEING MADE TO 

SECURE PRYOR IRWIN TO 

APPEAR HERE 



potato crop 

an-Dusen com- 1 



■"■ 1 ' 

t by tn^Aa 



Presbyterian Church 
Rev. R. L-. Barackman, Pastor 
On July fourth, our National In- 
dependence day, Sunday school will 
meet at ten o'cock. At eleven o'clock 
tlie hour of morning worship, the 
church will observe Holy Communion. 
Iu the evening at the eight o'clock 
hour of worship, the subject of the 
address will be in haijmony with 
Independence day. The men who 
have served- in the armies of the re- 
public are invited to be present as 
guests. 



puny, in the. Minneapolis News of 
recent-date with reference to the 
outlook in' this state and North Da- 
kota will no doubt prove of interest 
to every farmer in this county and 

herewith reproduced: 

Bumper crops through the North- 
west states and western Canada, with 
sufficient labor iii sight to harvest 
them, are indicated iu crop reports 
from many sources today. 

Fine Headway has been made in 
the last week by crops iu Minnesota, 
North and Soutli Dakota, and Mon- 
tana, according to the Van Dusen- 
Harriugton company. Equally good 
progress has beeu ljade iu Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan and Alberta, says a 
report issued by the Canadian branch 
of the U. S. chamber of commerce. 

Both in the. Northwest states and 
in Canada the crops are described as 
showing the best condition for this 
mouth since 1904. I 

Assurance that trouble from labor 
shortage need not be anticipated is 
given by Hugh Jennings, of the Fed r 
cral employment bureau. 

"Farmers in my district ai>e plan- 
ning for a banner year," declared 
Benjamin Mulford, owner of a farm 
near. Summit, N. D., who passed thru 
the city today on a motor trip to 



l'ryof Irwin, one' of the foremost 
retail counsellors and trade investi- 
gators of the nation, will be brought 
to the city in the nmr future 'to con- 
duct an institute for merchants, if 
negotiations now being conducted by 
the- Merchants' Association come to 
a successful close, 

Mr. Irwin, as head of 'The Retail 
Merchants - Institute, conducts a ser- 
ies of 



and whicb has created more | or less 
interest in this- state, is fast uearing" 
a total showing as the return* from 
the 2,000 precincts of the state filter 
in. and from all appearances it looks 
as if Laiiger is piling up'a load that 
will be hard to overcome. However 
a small majority ot tile priiiciucts are 
in and it is difficult to say jusr how 
the result is going to turn ou*. Both 
sides are. claiming victory. I. anger's 
lead late last evening showed' a total 
of 12,000. but the report from Grand 
Forks this morning at ten o'clock 
i nly gave' Lunger a lead of 3.000 with 
Sou precincts yet to hear from. In 
thi> opinion of the editorial depart- 
ment of the (Jrann Forks Ilcalil. it 
looks as if the ii-ague. candidates weie 
sure to win out. In the ■"■"0 pre- 
cincts yet to hear from, it is claimed 
t.hey are practically all league pr'e- 
if' they 
■ and re- 
The lead 

lot ."..."iiHl which I.auagcr held at ten- 
o'clock is ctii'i-oded' t.> hi- :i mi-.li'.'. 
small margin, e-pecially in view of 
the fact; Hint the mnj.i.iiy vf t h" 

. Yi'U-S VCT 1" I'Olllc ill ai'e I'l'-en e';:-.e' 

: crritory. The linal re-u!l i~ gener- 
i all'}" conceded by I he elilile ..i and 

i it seems certain that the le: 

i I.aunger held at ten .."ei.-ei. 

; nnuel'inlfy whittled deu n 

.' course of a few ln»ui> 

'jorily turned in 1'aver oi' l'raiie'.'. 

I Infiirmaiinii 'received it the 

'Grand Forks Herald at 2 :::n thi- af- 
ternoon is to the cllvei t'lat l.anaer 
is still in the lead wi-.li a iiia.iTii.v 
of 2.4IIII. There lire f"iir hundred 
precincts yet to lie heard from, which 
lie mostly in the western pan of tlie 
state and in view of Hie fae; that 
this is considered league territory,' 
the total resiill is vom-i-dcl to 1'ra- 



cincts and it now looks . 
Mere sure to carry the si; 
efeet Fra/der as govol'invr. 



which 
will he 



nl lie- ma- 



zier. 
The 



<l,a. 



out. 



et-together meetings of local , rlu . (;,,„„, ,,,„. k , All!1 . 
merchants and business people who [ ^^ , ,, t .,. 4rl „,.,„. 

are interested in retail merchandising. , (i( ||r ^ ,„„„,,.,.,, ,„.,.,.;,„.,,. .„■: to 
The general object of the meetings ' ( _ ^^ fnim j,^.^. Ul . ms , py „.-_ 
is to make available to local mer- I ([ f|u , v ^ u ; viH , hi , m .,-„ ril v w iU 
chants the best plans and methods ^ ^-^ ^ m||| Th( . pvi} ,. u ,,. u t(> - 

from arc all rural ami it; 
is conceded by everyone that l-'razier 
has won. 



for retail selling in use on the country, j )( he . u . d 
It is a series of meetings for the ex- I 
change of helpful merchandising 
ideas. Mr. Irwin, from years ol j 
close contact with all phases of tne \ 
business of selling, has accumulated ; 
a large store of ideas and plans for | 
promoting retail advertising, .wliicu ' 
promise to be of great value to the 
merchants of this city. 

Some* of his major points, in his 
institute, are: Meeting today's com- 
petition. Getting the most . out of 
your business. Opportunities in re- 
tail advertising, etc. 

Tlie service which Mr.' Irwin can 
give promises to be of great service 
to local merchants, and a large at- 
tendance is expected if it is found 
possible to bring him to this city. 

/ 



FAIR THIS 
YEAR TO BEAT 
ALL OTHERS 



\ 



SECRETARY AND BOARD WORK- 
ING DILIGENTLY FOR BIG 
FAIR 



Marries Couple at Badger 
The He' . J. B. Smith, of. this city,' 
was callet. to Badger to officiate at 
the wedding of Edwin Rankin and 
Miss Barbara Rankin. The groom is 
a graduatt of the Thief Biver Falls 
high schoil and is at present a civil 
engineer a t Mannom m. The bride is 
the daugl ter of one of the sturdy 
Scotch farmers who hare, played 
such an important part in the devel- 
opment o! the northwest. A large 
number ol ' guests were present at the 
ceremony and all seemed to enjoy 
the bountiful feast provided for the 
occasion. After a brief stay in Ro- 
seau cot nty the newly wedded 
couple, wi 1 make their home at Hah- 
nonien. 



It pays tc 



■ -,v-.>-.-l..i.. J --A..'-.-^-i-.<-:i.-.-.-.: ; 



r^r 



advertise, in The. Tribune. 




Barn Dance ! 

There wii'l lie a .big bam dance 
on the Carl Zwer farm, southwest i 
of this city on Saturday evening of j 
this week The dance is given by | 
Olson brothers, and a ijpleiidid- time 



Secreta 



V 



ll.e.v; 



d 



III 



liouncos that 

ciiuiracts priii-lii'iiUy every 
new ami iuti-resliiig ica-iif 
Pennington County Fair uli 



stireil all who attend: This is j on August -l,r, and I! thi- 



is a: 

the first -barn dance of the .season 
and it is certain to attract a good 
crowd- from all sections. The boys 
who arc staging the dance annuiu-e 
they have secured .excellent music 
for the occa-ion and promise there 
will be nothing missing at the big 
roundup. . 



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i Art 


ip ■■< 


iiuiry 


l.-vil 


with 



Young Couple Married 

' Walter E. Smith, the young bank- 
er, from Mavie. hud Miss Mary A. 
Jla^kspn, of Willinnr. Minn., were 
married Thursday. June 24.- at the 
home .of the bride. The ceremony, 
took place in the presence of the im- 
mediate relatives of the. bride and 
the happy couple departed on the af- 
ternoon train for the Twin Cities. 
.After spending some time there they 
returned to Thief River via Bemidji, 
where they made a.-brief visit to the- 
brother of the groom. The future 
home will be at Mavie. The nuptial 
knot was tied by Rev. J.,B. Smith, 
father of the groom. The Tribune 
joins in congratulations. 



Enjoy Picnic 

' The ladies' aid societies of the 
Methodist churches at Thief River 
Falls and St. Hilaire enjoyed a joint 
picnic at Aubol's giov.e, «ix miles 
south of this city on June 30. The 
grove on the river bank is certainly 
one of the beauty spots of the neigh- 
borhood with its many beautiful 
trees, the river nearby and the beauty 
bf;the landscape o'n the op;usite side 
of the rivet. Thq picnnT dinner and 
social character of the event alike de- 
lighted all who were privieged to 
lighted all who were privileged to 
to Mr. Aubol for his k'lndness in per- 
mitting the use of the grounds. 



He lias closed a contra-- 
Williams, who is known l 
over as the bigirest dale- 
regard to his inaiuivei-s in the air, 
that it is possible to u'ei hold of. 
Williams crawls over the win- of an 
aeroplane while in mid air. also 
hanging by his knees and perform- 
ing .other hair raising stunts, among 
which' is a drop from tli> plane while 
3.000 feet in. the air in a parachutir. 
His record has so far never been, 
equalled for thrilling performances 
in the air and it is certain visitors, 
to the fair this year will certainly 
get all- the thrills tliey may reason- 
ably expect and a few more thrown 
in for good measure. 

Many other new and interesting 
attractions are being booked aiid 
every indication points to a snappy, 
and interesting' program ' for the ■ 
year. Everything that has even been 
given before with many now fea- 
tures added, will be presented for 
the approval of Pennington, county 
ou these three big/days. The fair 
board are leaving nothing undone to 
make this year's fair the* big suc- 
cess of the time and with the proper 
co-operation from the. citizens of the 
county it certainly will be a fair 
worth attendng aud one which it will 
be hard to 'equal, in big or little 
cities. • i 

A detaled program of the attrac- 
tions will appear in a short time and 
as soon as all arrangements and con- 
tracts have been signed it is the in- 
tention of tlie secretary to announce 
in full, everything that is to appear 
ou the : program. 

Keep the dates well iu mind and 
start laying plans right now to at- 
tend the big event. 



] 



as* 1 - 






/ 



Page Two 



.....Automobile 



, — . — , — . _ 



THE TRffiUNE 



Campaign News..... 



"LABOR WINS ALL. "-/Tacitus 



can in a week. , He's six feet tail and 
there's not an ounce of fat on him; 
His grizzled mustache and white hair 
merely serve to set off the ruddy 
clearness .of his skin and the clear 
''blue of his eyes. He's about the fit- 



lrjtt to 



FRIDAY, JULY 2, 1920 



it, whether or not to pass it by. I ■ pretty har/l to persuade the roan to 
was pretty much discouraged just -back, anyhow, and' besides I didn't 
then, and' another flat failure — and! thing it'd 100k very good, so I let. 
the house seemed to hold out hopes 



of nothing but failure — didn't exact- 



A LITTLE' ADVICE 

What can defeat a strong 
man with \ a strong heart, who 
believes in himself and cannot 
be ridiculed, talked down, de- 
feated by J any obstacle or dis- 
heartened iby by, any temporary 
rebuff? — Orison SWett'Marden. 

Self-reliance is the best cap- 
ital in the world;— Anon. 

Sloth, like rust,' consumes 
faster than labor wears, while 
the-used key is always bright. 
— Poor Richard's Almanack. 

Nothing can bring you suc- 
- cess but yourself. In you and 
your effoijt and your persever- 
ance lie the only keys to suc- 
cess.^Ma'rshall. 

The worker has always won 
out. Never in history has theije 
been a" time when anything less 
than plain hard work could 
achieve a worth-while end.— 
Woodworth. 

Believe in yourself — work — 
adhere always to the one 
straight riad which leads to 
your goal — and there is noth- 
ing in the world that can hold 
you from that which you seek. 
— Williamson. 



! done/ during the remaining days of 
the eampaiin^whether you are al- 
ready an active worker or not. For 
some worker can go to work right 
now, start 1 .h active and determiueu 
drive -for subscriptions and votes — 
and in B'OUK WEEKS WIN' A LUX- 



— by increasing the volume and bet- 
tering the quality . of your work for 
subscriptions. 

INSIDE' OF A MIGHTY SHORT 
TIME YOU'LL FIND THAT IT IS 
PAYING YOU — THAT YOU ARE 
GAINING A BIG LEAD, SIMPLY 
URIOUS AUTOMOBILE WORTH i THROUGH YOUR ASSERTION OF 



EIGHTEEN HUNDRED DOLLARS. 

And — the person who stands high - * 
est at the end of this period will 
stand highest at the end of the race 



TO HAVE 
THEM, IN 



almost inevitably. YOU'VE GOTJ>i iave already done good work. MAKE 



VOTES AND LOTS OSf EVERY 
ORDER TO WIN — AND, COUNT 



NOW IS THE TIME TO GET THEM. ^PROMISE YOURSELF AND YOUR- 



HOW x\BOUT YOUR 
PHOTOGRAPH 



I VOTES BY 

You have a lot of friends, in and ] AFTER Tl 

around Thie! River Fails and living j PERIOD! ! 

sonic distance from your home, j GRET IT- 

i-oniiminUy, who have 



Consider this — a three year subscrip- 
tion, taken after Saturday, July 10th. 
will count 2u,000 votes — ONE HALF 
AS MUCH AS. AT PRESENT. THAT 
AMOUNT OF VOTES MAY MEAN 
ALL THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 
A GLORIOUS VICTORY AND A 
SMALL AOHIVEMENT FOR YOU. 
When you remember that this same 
decrease eft'ectS^every other subscrip- 
tion length proportionately, YOU'LL 
UNDERSTAND THE NEED OF DO- 
ING YOUR JBEST WORK AT OJJCE. 

DON'T HESITATE FOR. A MIN- 
UTE ! ! DO^'T SLOW UP AT ALL! ! 
JUST GO AHEAD WITH ALL YOUR 
MIGHT IN |a WHIRLWIND DRIVE 
AND A WHIRLWIND FIGHT FOR 
VOTES WHICH WILL WIN THE 
BUICK "SIX" FOR YOU. AND 
KEEP IT UP — ALL THE TIME- 
STRAIGHT THROUGH TO THE 
END. 

DON'T WAIT" ANY LONGER 

DON'T SACRIFICE THE WINNING 

HOLDING BACK UNTIL 

IE END OF THE FIRST 

YOU'LL ALWAYS RE- 



or m your 
never heard 
Tiilnuii''s ; 
campaign, 
yet learned 
.Tip lo you to 
■to llicin by t 
possible. 'i 
Tribune's ur 
you db tliis 
It' you wi 



latest photo; 
adequately 1 



if your -candidacy in The 

:l(.iut £.'i,<i00 aurVnnobi'e 

Those friends have not 

of your work: — and it's 

announce your progress 

he most effective Uiehod 

.■ management of The 

t race is willing to help 

'! write your name, and 



GET 
RIGHT NOW 

or thej:- 

HUNDRED 
A WEEK i 
THE CAMPAIGN 
YOU CAN WIN 



iddress plaii ly on the back of 



Manager. Ai 



partinent. Tl e Tribune, you will re- 



raph. and mail it in an 
ctivc wrapper to the 



y prolei 



loniobi:*' Campaign De- 



Hani 
constant application- 
Huki; '"Six 



EST OPPORTUNITY 
SEEN — DO I YOUR 



SELF. 

Start work today, if you are in 
the race but have done Titt'.e worlr. 
Redouble yjJur efforts today, if you 



MOMENT AND HOUR 
TO THE UTMOST — AND 



RIEN'DS THAT YOU'RE GOING 
TO WIN — AND THEN GO AHEAD 
AND DO IT!! 

SELF CONFIDENCE AND* HARD 
WORK WILL WIN A 'CAIh. FOR 
YOU ! ! ! 



TO 



HOW TO GET SUBSCRIPTIONS 

In your locality there are probably 
more than fifty per cent of the fam- 
ilies already readers, if upt sub- 
scribers, to The Senli-Weekly Tri- 
bune. Every person now taking The 
Tribune is good -for a renewal, of 
from one to five years. The mailing 
lists which The Tribune will furn- 
ish to workers in its great new cam- 
paign will give the names of those 
already subscribers, together with the 
date on which their subscriptions ex- 
pire. Go to all these whose, names 
appear on these lists — tell them of 
your candidacy and show them how 
their subscriptions may win for you 
— : antl you'll' tind that they will bt 
lad to renew. THEY BEING AL 



IF Y08: PAIL TO DO r I{E ADY SUBSCRIBERS TO THE 

YOUR BEKJT WORK RIGHT NOW!! | TRIBUNE KNOW THAT IT IS A 

YOUR SUBSCRIPTIONS | G0 OD PAPER— AND ARE GLAD 



ALL THAT YOU CAN 

—AND EARN FOUR 

AND FIFTY DOLLARS 

ifOR THE BALANCE OF 



THEIR SUBSCRIL'- 



rk — determined effort — 
win the 
for you on July 31st. 
DON'T LET) YOUR LIFE'S GREAT- 
GO BY UN-, 
BEST WORK 
RIGHT NOW AND WIN!! 



ounceinent of the most 
possible. The inaii- 
ynur photograph to 

agency for preparation 
er e'.octro-type. and will 
•oiir picture, together of hi: 
sketch, describing youi 
iving your address and 

about; your length of 
the community, etc., in 

i)f 'The S>.mi-\yeekly 



vuluabie, advertisement 
L BE - ABSOLUTELY 



the 
will 
you. 
few 



ceive an am 
effective nat ire 
atrer will sunt 
an engravin 
of a ut-wspai 
then insert 
' witli a brief 
candidacy, i; 
a few fads 
residence in 
tiiis (<ii'Jui:in 
Tribune. 

This service will cost 'you nothing 
— this serviie will -come to you in 
a niaii'ncr w-hich will give your can- 
didacy niurl 
— AND YVII. 
FREE. ■ 

I-'urthcriiKi 
automobile c 
prcparc a P 
bearing yt-111 
details' of yo 
fur help in 
which to- wi 
lars to you w 

Afi(.-r pul 
yinir pholugl 
yell unhanm 
pie coiiic 
lug your pli 
to you for 
.friends. 

'send IN 

GK-Al'II WI 

■WILL I1ELI 

lU/K'K -:SI>. 

JUST A 

Only a lit 
win the fir -t 
bune's great 
paign. Onlj 
REAL WO'I 



v. if you desire it 
mpaign manager 
lined cin'ular for 

photograph and a 
.:• campaign, with a pi'ea 
iceiiring the voles with 
1— and send the circn-- 
it htmt de'.ay. 
ration fur the first time 
apb will be returned to 
and if you wish sain- 
' the- insertion contahi- 

tograph will be mailed 
iisriibutiou among your 

YOUR BEST l'HOTO- 

I'lIOUT. DELAY!!— IT 

YOU TO WIN- THE 



is tile masti 
of condition 



creep in. T 
the belief 



HE 
CIIANC1- 



TO RENEW 
TIONS.. 

Make up a list of particular friends 

in the locality, whom you feel wih 

be willing to help you beyond giving 

their own subscriptions. Give them 

receipt books — these books will be 

furnished' to you in any number you 

may order — and have them pick up 

! all the subscriptions' they can. Just 

! as a politician must build up an or- 

', ganizatiou to back bis candidacy for 

! a certain office — so it is well for you 

j to build up an organization to back 

! your drive for the wonderful Buick 

I "Six," first grand prize in The Tri- 

! bune's great .?3,C0O campaign. 

i THERE ARE HUNDREDS OF 

: SUBSCRIPTIONS TO BE HAD IN 

I AND AROUND YOUR IMMEDIATE 

i TERRITORY— IF YOU GO AFTER 

THEM BEFORE SOME RIVAL 

GETS THEM. BUT YOU MUST 

- START WORK FOR THEM WITII- 

i OUT DELAY— YOU MUST BE GO- 

i 1NG GOOD BEFORE SOME OPPO- 

of doubt and fear never : X EXT COMES IN AND STEALS 

YOUR FIELD OF Wt)RK. 

"MAKE IT A HOT ONE!!" 



AS A iWAN TrllNKETH 



A man isjlitenuly what he thinks;; 

his <;hiira<-ter being the complete sum; 

A man is made or: 

unmade litf himself — his achieve- : 

ment.s are |W measure of his deter- : 

minatiou and his confidence. Man! 

r of thought, the moulder' 

and destiny — if he will , 

hut realize it 

Thoughts 
accomplish hnything, and never can. 
They ahvay: lead to failure. Purpose, 
energy, po\i er to do and all strong 
thoughts cei-^e when, doubt and fear 



test and the strongest and the hardi- : iy appeal to me. ' But I learned right 
est man of h!^ age that I^e ever; thm that< even , f j hafl ahnost . made 

knonn * * i u P niy mind to go on without stop- 

When Billy, who was^dowu in neaping, i wasn't the onlv member ot 
barnyard feeding iiis pigs, saw me | the party. The roan nVare had got- 
driving up the lane, he climbed oyer j ten so used to turning in that she 
the fence witt-the easy grace of a ( did it as a matter of course, and be- 
i'ad of twenty, and came striding up; fore I knew what was happening she 

had rugged the lines sideways and 



the yard- toward me. 

"Well— well — and if it isn't Bob! 
You're •'look in* fine., my boy — how 
are you and your mother getting on?" . 
Bili'y always has been interested in 1 
us f -and I couldn't begin to-te'.l the 
many decent, things he*s done for 
us.' We walked toward the house, 
and I started to taSe out my receipt-; 
book, preparatory to opening the at- 
tack. 

"Put it ui) — put it up — -" he smil- ' 
ed. "I know .ail about it. Bob. and ; 
Pm just going in^to get some, money ; 
for you. Wait just a minute." He \ 
took the back steps in two leaps, and 
was into the house. A second later, 
and he was bAck again. "I'll take, 
two years, now. Robert, .and if you 
need any more help I'll' be glad to 
give it to you. Come and see me 
again, my boy — I'm a pretty '.one- 
some old man nowadays." ■ Billy's 
daughter and sons are art out in the 
woijtil for " iheniso'.ve.} — one <Jf the 
sons is far t down in Mexico with 
some one of the various revolution- 
ary parties, ami another is practis- 
ing law -in Skagway. away up in 
Alaska. 

I drove out and started down the 
road, happy as a king. But — I SOOX 
GOT OVER IT. 

*&& the next five farms, one after 
another turned me down, two of 
them after IJf lime argument, ami 
the other three without even giving 
me a chance to show them my prop- 
osition. 

I turned <>!r the main pike onto one 
of the c{pun try roads — a road in good 
repair bur evidently used very litrle. 
The first house I <-aiuc to. was a little 
one — it didn't i'ook as though it had 
been painted for two or three year-, 
and the clapboarding was patched m 
spots with two by fours and 'ancient 
shingles. The roof of the pnjvh sag- 
ged dispiritedly and the fence had 
on'y a few ionely pickets. Tin- wind- 
mill in the yard groaned dismally — 
it must have been a year sin;*e the 
last time it had been okiul. anil the 
(tf the barn hung on one hinge. -Al- 
together, it wa.n't at all promising 
— it looked like about as poor a iead 
as any I had struck. 

I considered, while I drove toward 



the 

was turning up the driveway. 
■*on!dn*t wry well back out — L 



her go. 

An o!d man- was standing in the 

big old barn's doorway. He smiled. 
;poke. "Well, how are you to- 
mjYboy? Fine morning, isn't 



and 
day 
it?' 

It was indeed — and the sunny re- 
ception, the first' one that i'd're.ceived 
in some miles, went to my heart. 

"You bet it is," I .said. "Tins' ,is 
a wonderful country in iiu-e weather 
\ . 

(Continued on Page -U 



-^ 



t 


^jui^3&8&~ 


BSW^J- 


mwm&Sl 


H 


s§ 


WiMl 


ll§i 


IP 




-gglHl 


_rs^ _g?^- 


* 


CO-OPERATION 



IjEH'IND the average financial success will 
be found the close co-operation of a loyal, 
helpful bank. 

1 HE officers of this bank are particularly 
proud of its record in that respect. 



CITIZENS STATE BANK 



ib will to do springs from 
: ml the Arm ru-iteratiou 
of the \K'.iet that we CAN do. 

THE MAN WHO THINKS THAT 
CANNOT WIN — HAS NOT A 
IS' THE WOULD! Ami 
the man who knows that lie can do 
the ihinir'h? ha> set out to do— will 
do it. in spite of every obstacle and 
every dillicalty. It is oiuy the man 
in himself who . van 
it — only the man whose 



Mr. B. Busy Says 



who belie 
reach the 
mind and heart and soul allirm de- 
repeated'.y that he 
can ever vise 



iiid 



r.erminedly 

WILL achieve, who 
from the rut of life- 
Make it 
cultivate ji 



er 



i that will w 

j y°u 
™ ' a 1'i.ng way 

LITTLE WORK' " is unfJ 



tic wfirk w 



ill it 



I ill himself 
take to ' crowd. It 



Ki'iinil, prize i" The Tri- \ Neves that r^hii 



ii-'l.tlOO automobi'e eam- 
an hour or .so a day, of 

:'K. kept up constantly 
and consist cjutly. can win the Buick 
'•Six" for yijiu on' July aist. Victory 



your, first task. then, to 
belief in yourse:'f and an 
deteiininaiion to make good 
n the goal for you. When 
done this you have gone 
tow nl the toji. 
the-man with confidence 
who can rise aboye-tlie. 
is only the man who be- 
the ability and file 
and the TOWER TO 
vill ever reach a worth- 




■ is easy — am 

But' — don 

wasting tin 

time or alloi 



you cannot lose 
t get 'in the li'abit of 
— don't begin to lose 
yourself to lag, for any 



reason. Itcineinber that omy one 
hour wasted may mean loss for you 
anil victory for your riyals — remem- 
ber that a day or a week wasted be- 
cause of weariness or some- equally 
weak reason MAY LOSE THE 
BUICK "SIX'' FOR YOU. 

Put in just a little work, each day, 
if vou wish— Bl'T SEE THAT THE 
WORK DONE IS (iOOD WORK AND 
HONEST WORK AND CONSISTENT 



WORK. Ai 
THE TIME 

MAKE IT 
WIN ! ! ! ! 

FOUR 



"SIX", first 



d KEEP GOING ALL 
UNTIL THE END. 

A HOT RACE — AND 



HUNDRED A 
WEEK 



Kfiur hundred dollars n wefek- 
seventy dol'.ors a day — is what The 
Tribune is willing to pay you for 
work done, solo iring subscriptipns to 
The Trbune during the next four 
weeks of its great automobile cam- 
paign 

YOU CAN WIN THE BUICK 



grand prize, for work 



pportunity 
RISE who 
whiie -goal. 

CULTIVATE BELIEF IN YOUR- 
SELF AS |A PARAMOUNT TRAIT 
-^AND THERE'S NOTHING THAT 
CAN DEFEAT YOU!! 

* * * * v 

It is a fact that people are a'.waya 
willing to lie.lp that person -who 
seems to need help the feast. A 
winner— potential or-actual— will pnli 
more support than a wisher who 
doesn't seetn to have the strength or 
stamina to make, liis wishes come 



true. The 
the man v\ 
successful 
Nowher 
The Trihui 



inost successful man 
ho seems ai'ways most 



s this more true than in 
■'s great §3,000 automo- 
bile campaign; nowhere is self-con- 
fidence m< re essential and self-re- 
i necessary than in this 
for prizes. 
The wor ier that wins any one of 
the cars — - n- any' one of the . cash 
who earns a fajr-sizea 
check, even — WILL BE 

IN HIMr 



irreat race 



prizes 
commission 



ONE Will} BELIEVES 
SELF. 



Make ui 



teil everyone with whom you talk 



tliat you'r£ 
them that 



GOING to win. Tell 
you KNOW that you can 



win, and t'. .at you need them to help 



you put it 



harder ant 



your mind to win — and 



over. Then — make good 



on your promise to win by working 



longer for subscriptions 



People laugh at and discourage the 
man or woman who has the nerve 
to try something a little out of the 
ordinary : principally they do this be- 
cause they have not the stamina to 
try it themselves. 

Don't allow yourself to be drawn 
into an unworthy criticism of a com- 
petitor. It indicates poor knowledge 
of your goods and poor sportsman- 
ship as well. A good motto is 
"NEVER KNOCK." 



A 



The Best of §>. 
80\fears Experience 
in this New 
Small 
Ideal 



■A 




WHERE HERE'S 
WILL , 

> (Note: This true story of a 
young man's great .success, un- 
aided by riches or influence, in 
a campaign exactly similar to/? 
that now being conducted b$m ■ 
The Tribune, and written by ^N 
that young man seVeral years \ 

ago, will appear in installments 
in this column daring the pro- 
gress of The Tribune's great 
53,600 campaign. READ IT — 
DON'T MISS IT— IT HAS 
MUCH IN IT FOR YOU.) 
(By Robert Douglas) 



| Chapter Eight 

.-Bill 'Morton lives at the bottom of 
the long grade from the hills down 
into the old river bottoms — the long 
grade which is the joy of bicycle 
riders, when GOING DOWN, and the 
bane of automobile ( drivers, .when 
COMING UP. 

Billy's sixty-five, but he's the 1 best 
bundle pitcher in the country, and 
he can shuck as much corn in an 
hour as most lady-Vike farm hands 



e r 

THE accumulate^ manufacturing experience of over 
three-quarters of a century— and the judgment' of ' 
t; over .20,000 Ideal owners — is back of the new, 

! ; »mall 22 x 36 Ideal Thresher. 

You know the record and reputation of the larger sizes 
[of the Ideal— there's no fanning commnnity that hasn't its 
Ideal outfits with {heir satisfied customers. ,When we were 
called upon to build a smaller size separator, we didn't 
just "turn one out"— we built along, the same lines as the 
I Ideal, determined that our small i threshers . would be 
[leaders in their class just as are the larger. 

• So in the small as well as the larger Ideals yon wflll 
find those features' that mean the difference between a 
*We" and a "guesswork" job.* Ideal thresher owners will 
tea yon that. 

Buncoing, ort cylinder? winding; iai unknown in the' 
Ideal— because the Ideal is designed. or«( the principle of 
a afeady, stwi Sow of etrhir through tba macoina from 
the time it enters the cylinder nntu, free from all grain, it 
lares through the stacker. 

First of all, we placed the Ideal grates exactly right in 
relation to the cylinder, s Then we designed the Ideal trav- 
ailing slatted rake to take the straw from the cylinder and 
carry it to the straw rack.)? Result— more grate surface and 
» ataady even flow 'of straw, making choking, impossible. 



Shaking alone. wasn't a guarantee of complete separa- ' 
tion, so we put sets of lifdng fingers on the straw racfa^ 
that tear the straw operfc — rate it — beat it- from beneathj 
Result— complete separation and no waste. 

Then, to' take care of the increased capacity due to these 
inventions and to make the Ideal do a perfect job of clean- 
ing,' we put in extra chaffer area. -The chaffer in the clean- 
ing shoe, with tne adjustable sieve and our special system 
of wind control, guarantee a perfect job of cleaning with- 
out waste. . Result— the land of cleaning that gets "no 
dockage" at the elevator. 

Such construction shows why. the small 22 x 36 will' 
handle up to 900 bushels of wheat in a day's run— 1 
the 28 x 44 up to 1,500 bushels. 

The ideal is built in five sizes — 22 x 36, 28 x 44, 28 it 48 
32x52and36x60 — standard in design and construction, and 
meeting all needs, from 
the man who owns bis 
own power and wants 
todobis own threshing, 
to the custom thresher. 

There's an Ideal in 
vour neighborhood. 

7nc guaranteed 

- oil-burning, 

' oil-cooled 

OUPall Tractor is 

bmtt in rixem to fit 

•nary tixa Ideal. 




ADVANCE-RUMELY 



Peoples Auto Co. 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 



::. , .p-lf.iJi' :-;i:i.il't &L^h'ia&^x2ji>i&- ^i&rhv 



*■:-*;«»?> 



le^i.Ji'oi'VSaiifitv- ; , 



,L 



FRIDAY, JULY b, 19301 



WflERE THjERFS A WILL 

Continued i from Page 2. 



isn't it? And, by the way, sir, live 
something here that will help you 
a ^.whole It t to keep in close touch 
with this :ountry , if you are inter- 
ested. I would like to show you my 
proposition ,. lif you have the time — " 
and !l reached into my pocket and 
dragged; ou^j th£ circulars and' receipt 
books I carried always. 

He didnjt interrupt Tne — he didn't 
even try to stop me. — and before I'd 
gotten very far in my talk I found 
he was beginning to look interested. 
Suddenly he interrupted me: 

"How much is your paper, did 
you say?" j 

"Three dollars and a half a year, 
sir. However, on a three year's sub- 
scription, which is the longest term 
I am ali'owjed to take, the rate is re- 
duced a trifle, to an even ten dollars. 
I would hbnes'.y advise you, it you 
are going [to subscribe at ali, to do 
so for a jlong term. Paper, print 
supplies, and every other thing that 
goes into the production of a news- 
paper arc going to increase in price 
again witllin tue-Jnext few months 
— or I have reliable information to 
that effect,' at least. Naturally, if you 
subscribe for a long term, you will 
protect yourself against this in- 
crease in price. Don't you think it 
good business policy to get your 
order in before the increase in rates 
takes effect?" 

"Quite right — quite right. Will 
you make! me out a receipt? — for 
three years ! I'll write the check 4or 
you." 

He took a check book from his 
pocket — : ii I check book upon which 
was printed in' gold letters "Drover's 
& Merchant's bank, Holton." Holton 
is a town of about thirty thusand, due 
west of Horton, and a town which 
dominates ! the whole section in busi- 
ness. I 

I tore out the receipt an.d handed 
it to hiin, receiving in return a cheek 
which -I looked over — I have found 
it good business to a'.ways inspect 
checks as people- sometimes inad- 
ventontly make mistakes which are 
apt to void the check. The name 
stood out in strong, vigorous letters, 
written in \ purple ink by a hand 
.kvhose very signature was that of 
power. The name was Aaron Lang — 
and Aaron Lang was head of the big- 
gest real estate firm in noriii-weste"n 
Missouri! | He has accumulated a 
fortune, in I his years of hard work, 
and stands among the foremost men 
of the state in business and In poll 

#CRi i 

"Why 
The World, 
stain merin 

"1 surely 
here today 



THE TRIBUNE 



at Ivanhbe and Tyler oh the last 

day out 

parade 'of 

town, an 

a good ro 

tivites of 



A public meeting and a 

livestock were held in each 

evening picture show and 

ids meeting Closing the ac- 

the day. W. HI Poters, 

T. A Erickson and N, E. Chapman, 



Minnesota college of agri- 



from the 

culture, g"ave several addresses each 
day. The tour culminated at Tyler 
where 250 persons sat down to 
banquet presided over by O. Z. Rems- 
berg, county agent of Lincoln, and 
listened to an inspiring address on 
livestock production by W A. Mc- 
Kerrow o ! University Farm. It was 



a great w 



eek for the livestock inter- 



ests of Lincoln county. 



spapers Necessary to Business, 

over print paper charges 
newspaper proprietors of Win. 
mspend publication A re- 
dispatch from Winnipeg furn- 
ioquel. The customary ac- 
gayety of the street large- 
Wii'dest rumors be- 
curijent as to the local and 
■news development, with 
of the people unable 
to believe and what not 
Tremendous decrease in 



New 

A dis; 
caused 
nipeg to 
cent 

ishes the 
tivity anc 
ly 

came 
world-w 
the great 
to teli 
to believe*. 



disappeared. 



ide 



what 



to reiuode! 



why — do you really want 
■Mr. Lang?" I asked, 
from shier astonishment, 
do. You see. I'm out 
to look over this place — 
we have, just bought it and are going 



and extend it. We're 
planning extensive real estate oper- 
ations lout Jiere in the |:jexrj Jfew 
months — quite a few men from the 
— east are buying land from us and 
settle here. And, by the 
ke to make a little busi 



be at ''tfrist 
our farms 



.,,. local paper 



jilan to 

way — I'd 1' 

ness proposition to you. There will 



five tenants move onto 
in the near future and 



every one of them Will be wanting a 



SSo — I'll just buy five 
more yearly subscriptions to The 
World, and give a subscription 10 
each of them, just, as a measure of 
good feeling. What will be the total 
. amount.?" : 

Truly,' it: never pays to judge by 
appearances.. .Had! I gone on— had 
the. roan mare neglected to turn in — . 
I should have missed a deal which 
secured for; me six subscriptions and 
7.50 in cash. 

The best way to do is to try 
EVERY I"LA<JE YOU COME TO. 
And I hen you know you're playing 
safe. / / 

(To Be Continued Tuesday)/ 



Lincoln County stock / 

growers set the pace 

To {he Lincoln : County Livestock 
Breeders association belongs the dis- 
tinction of operating the first special 
livestock demonstration train ever 
run in Minnesota. The traiu expenses, 
amounting |to ?500. were paid by the 
breeders wjio sought to,/ carry the 
purebred livestock gospel to- their 
neighbors. ! Four cars 7 of purebred 
stock — Shorthorn, Hereford, Ilolstein 
and Red L"oll cattle/ l'o'.and China 
and Duroe I hogs. Shropshire sheep, 
and several varieties: of poultry — and 
a passengcrj coach/for the breeders 
and their friends and a party of 
speakers nia'de up/the train. The first 
stop was at 'Lake/Benton on June li>, 
the second at Hendricks on the fol- 
lowing daVvjauft the third and fourth 



■\l 




■> *,<.>* JJz-Mlfck ^^^&i^^&Mii&iZ-ix 



mass 



l)'nanes«?'*^s:f6lt"'l^r«intBe-Kioiu*8 ; 
usually .crowded by bargain hunters 
and other customers at this time of 
the year suffered great losses. 
Traction companies, theaters, and 
other enterprises and industries re- 
ported a decline in the vojfnme of 
business. The conclusion generally 
drawn from Winnipeg's experience 
is that Dusiness eanuot be effectively 
transacted 'and the daily life of the 
city cannot function without news- 
papers 



PERSONALS 

Mrs. C. E. Russell and children of 
Superior, Wis., arrived here Tuesday 
to be the guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Christ Christenson for a few days. 

Mrs. R. Alderman, who .has been 
visiting at the C. Mathesou home, 
left for her home at Grand Porks 
Wednesday. . 

Mr. and • Mrs. J. A. Paulson of 
Alexandria, motored down to visit at 
the Chris Christianson home for a 
few days. . . 

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Conner left 
Thursday evening for Denver, Colo., 
where they will visit with friends 
and relatives for two or three months. 

Rev. George Larson returned home 



T*b&i'3aiiaette Wednesday, whererhe- 
had been on business. 

Mrs. Julia Johnson returned home 
Wednesday after visiting with her 
parents at Steiner for a few days. 

Miss Giadys Nelson left Wednes- 
day morning for Radium, where she. 
will be the guest of Miss Dorothy 
Loen for a few days. Miss Gladys 
will also attend the fair at Warren 
which is on this week. 

Miss Esther Biom, of Middle Riv- 
er, accompanied by Miss Ruth Lang- 
seth, of Grand Forks, left for the 
former's home Wednesday, after re- 
ceiving medical treatment here for 
a few days. .' 

Calla Nordquist, of Roseau, who 
has been visiting in different parts 
of Wisconsin, left for her home Wed- 
nesday morning. 

James Monsebrat left for his home 
at Fargo, after visiting friends and 
'relatives here for a few days. 

Mrs. Jake Grenly and daughter, 
Pertha, left for their home at Alva- 
rado Wednesday, after visiting with 
friends and relaives in this city foi 
the past two weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Larson left for 
Alvarado, N. D. last Wednesday, 
to attend to matters of business. 

Miss Josie Larson left for Hatten, 



Page Three 



N. D., where 'she will' visit friends 
and relatives for an indefinite time. 
ASbert NeJson left Sor Fairdale, 
N. D. Wednesday, .morning, where 
hfe will 'be/empWyed during the sum- 
mer. 

Miss Cora! Amundson left Wed- 
nesday for Warren, where she will 
visit friends 'for an indefinite time. 

Mrs. Alfred- Carlson, of Middle 
River left Wednesday morning for 
Warren, where she willU-eceive med- 
ical treatment. \ 

Mr. and Mrs. Oluf Btrgren, of 
Grafton, N. D., -who have been visit- 
ing at the Sev/ Hanson and Andrew 
Manson homes, left for their home 
Wednesday morning. 

Misses' Alice and Ai'odie Paulson 
left for Warren Wednesday, where 
the latter will receive medical treat- 
ment. 

Mrs. H. O. Frederich, who has been 
visiting with friends and relatives 
at Kennedy, returned home hist Wed- 
nesday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Frederich arrived 
here Tuesday evening to visit at the 
H. 0. Frederich home for an indefi- 
nite time. 1 

Miss Anna Marvin, of Minneapolis 
who has been visiting relatives at 



Erie, returned to her home Tuesday 
evening. 

Oscar Knutson, of Grygla, left for ^ 
Minneapolis Tuesday morning, he re- 
turned Wednesday evening. 

Mrs. J. E. Wiison, of Duluth, ar- 
rived here Tuesday evening to visit 
with friends and relatives for some 
time. 

Rev. I. T. Aastail returned Wed- 
nesday evening from Detroit where 
he attended to matters of business. 

Miss Emma Watchgaard left for 
her ' home at Overly, X. D., after 
visiting for the past three weeks 
with relatives. 

Mrs. A. F. Lanska. left for Grand 
Forks where she will visit for an in- 
definite time' with friends and rela- 
tives. 

Mrs. Selnier Quamen and three 
daughters left. Tuesday for Grand 
Forks where they will visit for an 
indefinite time with' relatives. 

Arthur Pargon of Fargo- visited at 
the. J. Thill home between trains on 
Tuesday. 

Misses Olga and Agnes Koglin 
left Tuesday for Grand Forks where 
they will visit for two weeks with, 
friends and relatives. 






for the Fourth 



at....MOGENSEN , S.....on 

SATURDAY, JULY 3rd 

----- . ^ 

The Last Day of th^Mid-Summer Clearance Sale 



Palm Beach Suits 



$16- 



$20 -$24 



All Colors 



Silk Shirts 

Silk Shirt Values of $9, $9.50, $10, $12 and $15, now only 

$5.65, $6.45, $6.75, $7.95 and $10.45 

Sizes 12^ to 16 i 
„ A large assortment to choose from. 

Men s Dress Oxfords 

£8,80, $10, $10.80 and $\2 

E. O. MOGENSEN 



"If it Comes From Mogensen's it Must be Good" 






A V/EE.K LATE.R. | 



FAWWll 



r* AH . NOW WE DO HAVE 
/ A\ODERN DA1RT Ff\m 




^K 



HERMA.NKOX HARDWARE CO. 



S^^ft^Si^;^£^^.^fev;^ 



Page Fouij 



The 



Tribune 



SBin-WEBKLY 



ESTABLISHED 1001 



Official County Paper 



Pennington 
P 



Published . every 
Thiet Ri 



Printing Company 

iblishers 



Way, President 



Tuesday and ■■ Friday 
at 
er Falls, Mion. 



B. B. McWillian B, Editor and Manuger 



Foreipn Advertising Representative 
THE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 



Entered as sec 
post office at T 
mnder the Act of 



>nd class matter at the 
ilef River Fails, Minn.. 
March- 3, 1879. 



The Goody-pis r- Tire and -Rubber 
company of Ak -on, Ohio, are offering 
their- stock for Hale in an effort to 
raise $30,000,000.00: They say: 

In twelve y?ars the business of 
the company i as . increased more 
than one liundiesT times, earnings on 
outstanding eoiihion, after preferred 
dividends, 'hive averaged 54%; 
stock dividend.' have been paid as 
follows: 1008; 100% ; 1909, 100%; 
1911, 100%; 1913 20%; 1915, 
100%; 1020. i;b%. 

We are offering the unsold portion 
of $20,000,000 7% Cumulative Pre- 
ferred- and of $10,000,000 Common 
stock in blocks; of three shares (2 
-Preferred and l' Common)' at $300 
per /block. i 

Borton & Bcrton, Investment Se- 
curities, Leadei j building, Cleveland. 
Kalman, Matlesou & Wood, lie- 



Knight buildin 



man Co., Secu -ity building, Minne- 



npoi'is. The i 
in this ',ad\<pn! 



lformation contained 
iscment |s obtained 



from sources w6 believe to be reliable 



although we 
accuracy. — Min 
. Tlie. iiuui tl 
pays the 54%. 
a piece of belt 
or rubber good.' 
this company 
profitcers mire 
bend expense: 



William W. East- 



to. not guarantee its 
iieapolis Tribune. 
:it buy the rubber 
|lf you buy a tiro or 
iiig or a rubber heel 
in any line made by 
you are paying these 
usonuble salaries, over- 
honorariums per 



, — ,, ........... ,,^. 

qnisites iiutl trimmings of all kinds 
and then an admitted prolit of 54%. 



If we complaii 
"Why this uni 
some times? 
Tribune recom 
company but 
run this advei- 



, the big dailies say 
est, in these tr'ouble- 
The Minneapolis 
mends not only the. 
the plan when they 
isement. 



Here is anoiher one in the Min- 



neapolis Tribur. 
for Jufy Fund 



amount of pai 
capitalization 
with near.V 50 
1920 enrnin. 
crease over 11 



curities, MeKu 
olis, Teiepbone 
kee 1st. Wis. 



e: Good investments 
S% Preferred stock. 



Old established: company. Limited 



fieipating cumulative 
>f successful concern 
years earning record, 
at rate of 140% in- 
19. Circular- K2001. 



Alston and Company Investment sc- 



ight Bldg., Miimoap- 

Main 1509. Milwau- 

Bankj Bldg.; Chicago, 



108 So. La Salle St 

140W increase over 1919 — |nnd 
ashamed to sat' what 1919 earnings 
were. The consumer pays the 140%. 
Minnesota should not permit the sale 
of a stock in £■ company— producing 
a necessity — s 
annum, 1'rolitik'ring must be meas- 



ured by 
Certainly MO 
limits el* roast 



■I-1AVK \VH I. 
Philadelphia 
any case, ever 
i'y and ln-utall, 
conic. No out 
smallest polio; 
suretl peace, 
spending mi 



most tragica'il 
France hardly 
turn to pay he 



feels that sh 
costly standiu 
Foch makes n< 
early German 



I limited percentage 
far tibtive -the 



EAKXKD XOTHIXG": 
Public Lender: In 

body is talking blunt- 
today of wars to 
is daring to risk the 
looking towards as- 

Every great nation is 

lions on armament 



though most of them need the money 



r for other purposes. 

knows which way to 

r debts, and her indus- 



tries clamor fir man-power; yet she 






.■Jlfi '•>>•'«' 



THE TWBUNE 



FRIDAY, JULY 3, 1920 



so long and ardently. 

Borah tnd Johnson and the never- 
say-die crowd -will seize the bludgeon 
that Mr. Wilson invites tfiem to taie 
up ; and rill wield it with- vigor and 
venom. Senator James Reed, the 
Missouri lemocrat, will also, continue 
to take tie hide off the league. The 
invitation to the dance -will be ac- 
cepted by them and they will even 
hire the •! ddler so that they can step 
out, not in the league's planks and' 
provision: , but to romp all over it, 
and it will be some romping, one may 
be assured. 

Then, too there is the San Fran- 
cisco copventibu. lit is ftlie fcon- 
vention of the party that took Mr. 
Wilson up and did so much for him, 
and it remains to be seen if demo- 
cracy at the Golden Grate will stand 
hitched, lutcbed to and on the league. 

The ptjop'.e of the United States 
have a right to settle once and for 
all the fate of the league of nations, 
if it is a j serious problem, and it is. 
There has been so much said for 
and against the league that it is time 
that the t ourt of lii-r re-sort, the peo- 
ple, that fhost which walks once ev- 
ery four years, and . then only for 
one day, a November day, should 
have sdni 'thing to say on the league, 

The les gue has been ding donged 
at us until it is time to test the metal 
of the b ill. So many tunes have 
been play ;d on it that some of them 
have proi en to be rank dissonances. 
It does s tund like it was out of 
tune with the Monroe doctrine, with 
all Amerit anism, and that it is simply 
a trouble maker for the United 
States, a new sort of international- 
ism. 

Let's g 2t the thing into or out of 
our national system. Let's reject or 
approve it. Let's see whether the 
people's '{eyes are jaundiced" or not. 



beer and wine proposition to the in- 
dividual states. 

It is 147 miles to the place where 
the supreme court would .render its 
decision on the..c.onstitutionality of, 
the repeal legislj[Hon. '** 

It is 840 miles to the state i'egisla. 
tion necessary" to permit the manu- 
facture of wine and beer. 
. This is. a total distance of 18,536 
mii'es, and it is a certainty that any- 
body who is dry now would be dead 
before the distance could be made. 



GOING SOME . 

One newspaper correspondent de- 
clares or predicts that Tom M:,shall 
will be the democratic candidate and 
will run in a platform of leaving to 
the individual states the manufacture 
of beer ttiid light wines. But there 
isn't niuoit comfort in this thought 
for the thirsty. It is a long way to 
Tipperary if you go this route. 

Uoughly speaking it is 207 miles 
to die plate .where Tom Marshall gets 
the nomination. 

It is llj.S mii'es to such a plank in 
tile. democratic platform. 
' It is 1,802 miles to the election of 
■atic ticket on such a plat- 



|,222 miles to the point 
slate legislatures would 
repeal the beer aiid wine 

of the 18th amendment to 




WHAT FIVE YEARS BROUGHT 

New York Evening Post : At Soth- 
eby's autiou rooms in London last 
week was sold a manuscript of 1^ 
pages, folio, by Abraham Lincoln, 
being the draft of a portion of one 
of the speeches made in the Lincoln- 
Douglas debates. The draft reads: 

"Yet I have never failed — do not 
fail — to remember that in the repub- 
lican cause there is higher aim than 
that of mere office — I have not al- 
lowed mysef to forget that the aboli- 
tion of the slave trade of Great Brit- 
ain was started a hundred years be- 
fore it was a final success; that the 
measure had its open, fire eating op- 
P'uents; it's stealthy 'don't care' op- 
ponents; its dollar and cent oppon- 
ents "; its inferior race opponents ; its 
Negro-equality opponents and its re- 
ligious and good order opponents ; 
that all these opponents got offices 
and their adversaries got none. But I 
also remember that, though they 
blazed like tallow candles for a cen- 
tury, at last they flickered to the 
socket, died out, stank in the dark 
for a brief season^ and were re- 
membered no more even by the 
smell. * * * I am proud in my 
passing speck of time to contribute an 
humble mite- to the glorious consum- 
mation, which my own poor eyes 
may not last to see." 

With this manuscript was an auto- 
graphed letter by Robert T. Lincoln, 
datetl September IT, 1892, 
iiig it as follows: 

"This manuscript is not 
made in preparing one 
speeches in the joint debate between 
Mr; Douglas ahd my father in 1858. 
Tlie campaign was for a seat in the 
United States senate, and the politi- 
cal issue was the extension of the 
system of slavery to the free terri- 
tory of our county. My father did 
not know that in less than live years 
a proclamation under his own sig- 
nature would not only end all ques- 
tions of the extension of slavery to 
the free territories of the United 
States but would free all the slaves 
in all the states." 



describ- 



a note 
of the 



.When in need of Job Printing 
phone The Tribune.— No. 33. 



staggering un 



must maintain a 

army and a big navy. 

bones of predicting an 

r war revenge. Italy, 



ler an enormous debt, 



keeps an • expensive army to watch 



her extended 
and America 
lions for war: 
ib!e foe existk 
change from 
winter of 191 
thenV K"a: 
Mll-i tile hid 

tim'.c to take 



frontiers. Even Britain 
ire -voting colossal mil- 
hips for which no vis- 
Tbis is 'a great 

the heyday of the 
S-19. Were we all fools 
there never a chance? 
ous curse of war eon- 

our tirst-boru and our 



bost-heloved forevorV Or did we just 



miss the niti 
faith? 



WELL, 



precedents by 
.the New Yo 
appeals for a 
league of nuii 



oiinium for want 



of 



LET'S FIND OUT 



^President Wilson has broken all 



giving an/interview to 
k World /in which be 
fight to a finish on the 
ions. Presidents do not 



give out interviews, but Wilson iib- 
.-■ — bors precedents. It- will be recalled 
that he mad<; a famous pre-election 



appeal to the 
The New 
conLrsatu'ated 
organ which 



aditiinisrratio 
but it seem 
the aim- ai 
which is r'soi 
New Yurie nt 



people at one time. 
York World is to be 
on being made ' the 
has carried the presi- 
dents message; on the league to the 
people. It 
that the Xow' York Times was the 
's greatest defender, 
that Hie. World called 
got the interview, 
c ' "scoop" for even 
wspapor 



'.tit as to the tight on the league. 



President Wi 
linish,' and 
go, it .since 



lson wants a tight to a 

looks like lie would 

he has sought for it 



N the language of the slangist' "Willie 
piped a mouthful, vyhen he told his 
mother ice cream was "not a luxury — but 
a necessity." 

Because Ice Cream is Food 

Good wholesome food, carrying the butter 
;'at of thick, rich frozen cream. Fuel for the 
1 liiginc.- We all need it. 

Home consumption of ice cream has in- 
creased vitually 100 per cent in America 
: n the last two years. 

Why? Because Ice Cream has stood the 
est— the pure food test— as a health-build- 
ng food. Order today— brick or packed. 



Puritas Ice Cream 





Sedan for Hot Days 
and Rough Roads 



Open to Breezes or Closed to Storms You Ride 
With Remarkable Economy 



OVERLAND SEDAN or COUPE are cars forbusiness or social 
duties; for open-car freedom or closed-car protetion. Triplex 
Springs not only make possible greater riding ease, but reduce 
upkeep by saving the car from the wear and tear' of the road. 
Combined with light weight these springs make this first class 
motoring very economical. The Sedan established the exception- 
al record of 27.6 miles per gallon in trying the Los Angeles- 
Yosemite Economy run. The complete equipment and attrac- 
tive appearance add still more to the advantages of the 
Overland Sedan. 



Northwestern Auto Co. 

K. A.. Sundahl, Prop. 



./. 



...Tribune Want Ads Get Results... 



Keystone Silos 

' . (Patented) 

Keystone Silos Stand Winter's Supreme Test 

BETTER YOUR FARM— SAVE YOUR WASTE— BUILD A SILO THIS YEAR 



FILLING HOLE 

Large size — galvanized frame — 
hinged. Place where wanted. 
Heavy ri!/l$'d wire glatss cover, 
admits light. No broken giass can 
fall into- feed. 

AIORTARLESS JOINTS 

No mortar joints in a Keystone 

silo. 

Joints are sealed with cement wash 

after wail is built. 

THREE WALLS IN A KEYSTONE 
Outside Skin — waterproofed ce- 
ment wash. 

Concrete Block-^oontnining steel 
reinforcing. 

Inside Skin — waterproof cement 
wash. 

This makes a dry wall and a 
warm wall" becuse it's dry. 

THREE INCHES THICK 
Thick enough for strength. 
Thin enough that wall will warm 
quickly when the sun shines In 
cold weather. 

Bottom of pit level with top of 
foundation leaves silo wail from 
bottom to top without projections 
to interfere, witn silage settling 
- uniformly. 

3 ti> 1 CONCRETE 

keystone Blocks are made of 3 
parts of clean sand and gravel and 
1 part) Portland cement. 
Always factory made and cured. 




-V^r--" 



HOOP STREMiTH— Rl-iM ORCI.Vi 

::-•< in. sl.-i-l rods. -In-ddi-d in .-,,»- 
'■rcri'. .-ii-i-ic this silo I'l-j.iu liun.im 
to to|). 
Tin-si' hOH'S :nv seven iiu-lies ;|- 

parr. 
'Proper It.'oiis stri'iiL'lh moans a 

sttcoesst'tll silo. 

THE STKMI. RAI'TKIiS 

Olio each two feet ejtriy the weight 
of this oom-reto roof and reinforce 
it. 

I-'iro — Wind — Hat tie I 'roof — Per- 
manent. Keeps out cold — retains 
natural silage heat. 
DOOR SYSTEM . ' 

PRIDE OF THE KEYSTONE SILO 
Each door a unit. Hinge and 
ladder combined. 
■T.ovks open automat ie;il]y. 
■Hefrigcrator type seal. J-piy Red- 
wood iloors — paper ijisulateil. 
Ite'lu'o'ni resisis -tiro ami rot. 
Single simple !.»■];. Impossible to 
aeetdenr.-tlly !oek yi-rsolf in. 

>„ STEEL RODS PROTECTED 

'"-• ; -i All 1-oinfHi-eiiiL' is buried in eon'-rcte. 
; -,t A Keystone si:o i~ btiiit like --Sky- 
;lj scrapers" and large corn-rote- . 
__-^ bridges. 
'['■J§'r Hoop style reinforcing of steel 
i:^ arc bolted securely to the heavy 

^ cast iron door frame. 

Pour hoops fasten to each door 

frame casting. 

Strength where strength shotm! be. 



CONCRETE AND STEEL from TOP to BOTTOM 

We Build Them Complete on Your Farm 

BUILT TO SAVE THE CROP THAT NEVER FAILS 



iECR- 



Thief River Falls,. Minnesota 



;«'.>i»i,i*Ai'4\ ;.- *:LXy't' -1 • ■£-'. si.i\'- -ivtA^: 




-*- 



FRIDAY, JULY 2, 1930 



■— «r ■f^r>rf i Txr r r. 






THE TRIBUNE 



Page Five 



: !\~^j&*t^:»^y^"&\^'tL**M 



CAN WIN A GAR 

1 ■ ■ ■ . * 

For One Week's Hard Work 



r- 



THE first period of 
row. After that 
now. If you are in ro 
make it impossible for 



The 



date 



Thief River Falls Tribune's great $3,600 automobile campaign closes Saturday night, July 10th — one week from tomor- 
, subscriptions turned in to count in The Tribune's wonderful race count only ONE HALF as many .votes as they do 
—now is the time to do it. Hard work done before next Saturday night can give you a large enough vote reserve to 
any of your rivals to beat you. DO YOUR BEST WORK NO W!l 



Win 



Standing of Contestants 

District Number One 

Harry Lund, City - ...180,000 "" 

Mrs. Edwin O. Erickson, City. 153,00.0 

O.L. Cronstrom, City 100,000 

Miss. Agnes Ofedahl, City 10,000 

Mrs. Lawrence Hermanson, City 10,000 

Robert Halvorson, jCity 120,000 

Leo Miller,. City _ 10,000 

Mrs. Henry San lee, E.F.D., City 10,000 

Julius Liden, RF.D., City. : 10,000 

'Mrs. Thomas Ro\van, City 1 150,000 , 



JLuella Peterson, 



Mrs. H. F. Boreen, City 



distr 



One hundred anil tw 
the worker .in each 
in his district. 
Seventy live dollars in 
district who secures 
district. 

Sixty live dollars in 
district who secure!! 
Fifty; dollars in cash 
trict who secures the 
Twenty five dollars in 
district who secures t re 



District Prizes 

ejity live dollars in cash will be given to 
L'ict who secures the highes vote totxl 



the 



ash will be given to the worker in each 
third highest vote total in his district, 
will be given to the. worker in each dis- 
fourtu highest vote total in Irs district, 
cash willJ>e given to the worker in each 
fifth highest vote total in his district. 



City 60,000 



10,000 



cash will be given to the worker in each 
the second highest vote total in his 



Standing of Contestants 

District Number Two 

Betty' Johnson, Holt - 90,000 

Sylvia Pierson, St. Hilaife 170,000 

Olive Wing, Middle River '. 10,000 

Martha Albin, Plummer 1^5,000 

Ethel Anderson, Wylie 75,000 

Lorraine O'Hara, Newfolden 10,000 

William Novak, Wylie 10,000 

Borghild Berg, Middle River _... 10,000 

Bertha Olson, Middle River : 10,000 

Mrs. E. Singer, Erie _ , _ 140,000 

' Guuder Tviet, Golden Vlaley . 70,000 

Arthur Olson, Middle Rrser 10,000 

Emma Anderson, Middle River ....... ....10,000 

B.O.Norby, Goodridge - 110,000 

Anna Knudson, Kratka , 10,000 

Lawrence Rierson, Box 672,Holt 10,000 

Mrs. C. E. Lundgren, Viking .-....'... 00,000 



Capital Prizes 

The Buick "Six" touring car will be awarded to the candidate 
in any district who secures more votes than any other caiuli- 
dates in all districts. 

The Overland "Four" touring car will be awarded to the candi- 
date in any district who secures the second lav-rest innnltcr 
of votes in all districts. 



First Capital Prize— Buick *Six' Cost $1,790.00 




i 



Purchased from and on display at 
The People's Auto Company, Thief River Falls, Minn. 



J 




The Tribune is going i o give away on July 3 1 st a Buick "Six" and a Overland "Four" and nearly one thousand dollars in cash prizes. You can 
take your pick of thes e prizes — you can win any one of them, by simply working hard for subscriptiqps. Good work done before the end of the 
:first period will give j ou a strong vote reserve — good .work done from the end of the first period to the end of the campaign will win a car for 
you, backed up by the strong vote reserve you can now obtain. YOU MUST DO YOUR BEST WORK NOW" IN ORDER TO WIN!! Make 
:he next week win a ear for you by doing your very hardest work!! 






i 



&Mm&&m 



I " ■ - ■ 



■i^fe^kaC^iiMite^^ 



SSS* 



— *• it 




Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Amble, accom- 
panied by their grand-daughter, Eve- 
lyn Brown, camt over from Grand 
Forks Saturday to spend a few days 
at home, after Which they win re- 
tnrn to N. D. ;, the former to transact 
business in connection with the Park 
Region nursery and Mrs. Amble to 
visit relatives. 

Miss Lilly Johnso i was at Crooks- 
ton, over Friday night to visot with 
a friend, who wasler route from Foss; 
• ton ito her home in North Dakota. 

A\ carload of household goods and 
machinery, consigned^ to Ed Will, ar- 
rived) frm -Gonvlck Friday and was 
- tafcen out to his farm near Wylie. 
/ Miss Violfl Weitphal, who is em- 
ployed as a nurse at Minneapolis', ar- 
f rived Saturday for a visit with her 
folks residing we it of the village. 

Mrs. H. F. Hai son, Misses Nellie 



and Inga Follstac 
Thief .River Falls 
Mr. and Mrs. 
combined b 



were among- the 

visitors, Saturday. 

A. • Satterberg were 

isiness and pleas- 



ure trip to the Tviu Cities over the 
week-end. 



Mrs. C. Biglow 



from Oklahoma, 



and sons recently 



arrived in this part o€ the country 



vhere they spent 



the winter. The fainiry has taken up 
their abode at Thjjef River Fails. 

A very interesting game of base- 
ball was played ou| the local diamond 
Sunday between the Bed Lake Fall's 
and St. Hilaire tedms. The visiting 
team brot with them the band and 
a number of baseball enthusiasts, 
but all encouragement which they 
received, tho it urged the players to 
put up a more gallant fight, could 
not prevail against jtlfe locals and the 
. hard-fought game resulted in a score 
of 2 to 3 in favor of St. Hilaire. The 
' game was . largely attended. 

A very pretty Wjedding took place 
Thursday, June 2-jl at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. D. Patterson, when 
their daughter, Etllel,. was united in 
marriage 'with Cecil F. Bratner of 
Aurora, in. The bride was charm- 
ingly attired in a gown of ivory satin 
and worei a veil. The couple was un-. 
attended and as they entered the room 
which had been ^astiiy decorated 
with a profusion of pink and white 
lady-slippers, the beautiful Mendel- 
sohn w-edding march was played by 
Miss Harriet Mathers. Rev. A. F. 
Nelson read the impressive ceremony 
and only relatives 1 nd very intimate 
friends of the coi tractiilg parties 
were present for tli; occasion. 

The bride, a cultured' and accom- 
plished young woman, was born and 
reared in our midst and has the re- 



spect ard admiration of all who 
know h< r. After her graduation 
from th< St. Clond Normal, she has 
taught ii the public schools of Little 
Falls an I Wadena,* and everywhere 
she went her charming personality 
won for her many warm friends. 
The groc m is a highly respected and 
estimable ! young man who repre- 
sents a farge publishing concern of 
Aurora, ] life. 

The young couple left Thursday 
evening, via the Soo line on a honey- 
moon to lr to various points in this, 
stntej alter which they will make 
their.'hone in Aurora. A host of 
friends ( xtend congratuations and 
good wis les for a happy and success- 
ful journsy thru life. 

Misses Ada Bratner and Harriet 
Mathers, who were here to attend 
the Patt »rson-Bratner wedding, left 
Friday ; he former returning to her 
home at Marshall and the latter to 
St Cloud where she is empoyed as 
,a comme -eial teacher. 

Wild strawberries are ripening and 
the weather this season has been' es- 
pecially jconducive to their growth, 
so they pre very plentiful, but mo- 
squitps are .also plentiful and very 
troublesome to the berry pickers. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Giese^and chil-* 
Uren motored over Sunday from their 
home near Euclid to attend the ball 
game anil spend a few days at. the 
H; O. Jadkson home. 

Walteri Berg arrived Monday from 
Minneapolis for a visit at the home 
of his mother, Mrs. Ole Sherva. 

A rai'iway bridge building crew is 
at work I putting in a new railroad 
bridge over the creek in the south- 
ern part [of town. 

The Ladies' aid of the Nor. Luth. 
church will be entertained Friday, 
July !), by Mesdames Mili'er Peterson, 
Gabriel Peterson and K. T. Dalager 
at the r( oms over the Xei'son store. 

Death summoned Mrs. Adolph An- 
derson t( her final rest, Wednesday, 
a rest which was deserved 
>me after eighty-nine years 
The deceased was bom in 
Sweden, but had lived in this coun- 
try for nany years. She and her 
husband and elder children setted in 
Polk Centre township when this en- 
tire, country was but a vast wilder- 
ness, and to her are attributed many 
of the virtues which go to make up 
a fine pioneer woman. Mrs. Ander- 
son had been ill for some time with 
a complication of diseases peculiar 
to old age, and her advanced years 
lessened the power of resistance and 
eventuali'y led to death.' She is sur- 



June 23 ; 
and welc 
of life. 



; Viv;ea by ' her" aged' husbandi, seyertd. 
grown children, who have all gone 
to homes of their own, a number, of 
grand children and great-grand chil- 
dren. The entire community extends 
sympathy to the bereaved family. 
Funeral services were conducted Sat- 
urday, by. Kev. A. F. Nelson at the 
Black River Swedish Lutheran church 
and the remains were gently laid to 
rest in the adjoining cemetery. 

Miss Cornelia Brevik returned 
Monday from a brief visit with her 
brother, A. O. Brevik, who runs a 
newspaper at Finlayson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brick, Adolphson of 
Fresno county, California, who were 
visiting at nearby points, arrived here 
Friday in answer to a message, tell- 
ing of the death of the former's 
mother, the late Mrs. Anderson. 

Rev. C! M. Grimsnul was at Hal- 
ma, Kittson county, to attend a Mis- 
sion meeting early in the week. 

Miss Inez Patterson left Monday 
for Sauk Center, after having spent 
her ten days vacation at her parent- 
al home. 

Miss Ester Fricker returned Mon- 
dy from Grygl'a, where she had 
spent a. -week at the home of her 
sister, Mrs. V. Nelson. She returns 
to Grygla the latter part of this 
week to remain until after the Fourth 
of July. 

Miss Gertrude Hooper returned 
Tuesday from a fortnight's visit with 
friends in the Twin Cites, after hav- 
ing represented the i'ocal Rebecca 
lodge at the Assembly, at Mankato. 

J. A. Grimsrud left Tuesday en- 
route to his home in Wisconsin, after 
having- spent a few weeks very 
pleasantly at the home of his proth- 
er, Rev. C. M. Grimsrud. 

Mrs. Carl" Johnson and ' daughter, 
Lilly were at Thief River Falls Wed- 
nesday evening to attend the San- 
dum-Holt Wedding. 

Hon. HaiVor Steenerson was in 
the village Monday renewing ac- 
quaintances and doing campaign 
work in the interest of his candi- 
dacy for U. S. congressman. 

Miss Alice Fricker went to -Thief 
River Falls Wednesday evening to 
remain for a few days visiting with 
relatives and friends. 

Miss Anna Vik left yesterday to 
visit friends at Twin Valley and De- 
troit. 

G. I. Fellman attended an I. O. O. 
F. initiation at Thief River Fails 
Wednesday evening 

There is .to be a picnic church 
festival at Oak Ridge church Sun- 
day, July 4. 



VIKING 

Several' of the Viking young peo- 
ple autoed to 'Warren Tuesday ere- 
ning of last week and attended the 
Y. P. S. of the Swedish Mission 




new quarters of the 



Thief River Music Co. 



215 



Saturday 



East Third Street 



Evening, July 8 



at 8 o'clock 



The public is invited to come and inspect the finest music store in the state 

outside the Twin Cities. There will be vocal and instrumental music, and 

an unlimited nun ber of new phonograph records. 



As souvenirs 
there wil 
ladies an 



Cope and spend part 
All 



Thief River Music Go. 



)f the evening at this up-to date store, 
be made welcome. 



will 



of the occasion 
be flowers for the 
cigars for the men. 



Hanson & Barzen 



Wheat, No. 1 northern, per bu. 2.51 

Wheat, No. 2 northern, per bu. 2.46 

Wheat, No. 3 northern, per bu. 2.41 

Wheat, No. 4 northern, per bu. 2.21 

Wheat, No. 5 northern, "per bu. 2.12 

Durum wheat, No. 1, per bu. 2.46 

Durum wheat, No. 2, per bu. 2.43 

Durum wheat, No., 3, per bu. 2.38 

Durum wheat, No. 4, per bu. 2.31 

Durum wheat, No. 5, per .bu.. 2.27 

Oats, per bu. .98 

Rye, per bu. 1.96 

Barley, per bu. 1.19 

Flax, No. 1, per bu. ■ 3.43 

Flax, No. 2, per bu. 3.21 

Bran, per cwt 3.38 

Shorts, per cwt 3.00 

' Tesaum Seed, Grain & Supply Co. 



Cracked Corn, per cwt 
Whole corn, per cwt. 
Hay, per bale 
Middlings, per cwt. 
Oil meal 

Thief River Produce Co. 
Hens; light, per lb 
Heavy hens, per lb 
Roosters, per lb 
Turkeys, per lb 
Horse hides 
Calf hides 
Horse hides 
Eggs, per doz. 

T.R. Cooperative Creamery 
Butter, per lb 
Butterfat, per lb 
Milk, per quart 



3.70 
365 
1.50 
3.10 
4.60 



.14 
.18 
.10 
.18 
.03@.6o 
.15 
.04 to .05 
.30 



.57 
.57 
.10 



church held at John Peterson's south 
of Warren. 

Misses Lillian Lindquist and 
Esther Taiigquist and Iver Anderson 
and Paul Fi'odstrom *ook in the big 
meetings at Lancaster Sunday. 

The G. F. Peterson family of 
Warren called at Viking Sunday. 

Tom Joseph was in town last 
week. 

Sam Olson came out from Warren 
Saturday evening and spent Sunday 
at F. Anderson's. 

Misses Helen Larson and - Inge- 
borg Tweetuui, and Emil Bcekman 
and Hurry Jultnsim of the Spaultling 
farm* at Warren were p.'oa::ant Sun- 
day evening callers at Miss Larson's 
home at this place. 

A number of Viking people at- 
tended the Mid-Summer fest at Oslo 
Monday. Juno 2S. 

Rev. Scgerstrom took part in the 
Mission meetings held at Rosewood 
last week. 

Miss Etliei Styrlund visited with 
friends in Rosewood the forepart of 
this week 

Dr. and Mrs. Lindquist and baby 
visited at Bernard Ranum's Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Forsberg left 
for the cities Saturday evening 
where they will spend sonle time 
visiting with relatives and friends. 

The N. Amundson family from 
Comstock visited at C. Samuelson's 
Sunday. 

Mrs. John Gabi-ielson from Beau- 
dette, is a guest at the M. Tostrup 
Koine at present. 



GERMANTOWN 

Mr. and Mis. Jolm Aandnhl and 
children, Ario and Maurice, visited 
at the D. Dan home Tuesday. 

Miss Selmii Johnson visited with 
Bernice Strubel Thursday. 

Mrs. Emil Hanson was a puest at 
the A. K. Haggy home Wednesday. 

Mrs. Henry Paulson and children 
(iiadys, Kdna and Harry, returned to 
their homes at Bemidji, Monday af-. 
ter having visited at the Martinus 
Johnson home for some time 

M.i". and Mrs. Christ Neisoii called 
at the Hang .Tors tad home one day 
last week. 

L. Bendiekson and daughter, Silva, 
were shoppers at Mavie Thursday. 

Mrs. A. K. Haggy was an electric 
car passenger enroute to Thief River 
Fails where she spent the day with 
her daughter, Einma. 

Miss Silva Bendickson visited at 
the Seraphine Ro'.lantl home one day 
last week. 

Mr. and; Mrs. J. Payne and son, 
Daniel accompanied by Mrs. "Will 
Wayne and children motored to Aus- 
tin, one day last week where, they 
will visit for some time 

Pan;' Stock called at the A. Ristau 
home Tuesday. 

Matins Nnnm visited with Hans 
Johnson last Sunday. 

Hans Dahl was a Germantown 
caller last Friday. 

C. Strubel ami children. Howard 
and KohIi, were Mavie callers last 
Thursday. 

Miss Bernice StrubeY visited with 
Ruth Boyce. last Sunday. 

Miss Bessie Roller was a German- 
town caller Monday , 

rtiuests at the Bendickson home 
Sunday were- Annie, ^puise and Ed- 
win Rosett. 

Mrs« Harry Weiber and children, 
Hannah aiid Vio'et, spent last week 
as guests of relatives and friends at 
Thief River Fails.' 

Amelie Reitze of Thief River Falls 
is spending a few days visiting at 
the Can" Klockman and Jno. Philip 
homes. 

Jno. Aandnhl made a trip to Thief 
River Falls Saturday returning home 
Sunday. 

Helen Tjongevan spent Thursday at 
Thief River Falls. 

Ajbert Rhroer called at the S. 
Rolland home Thursday. 



Wait!-- Don't Operate! 



Take Sto-Ii-gal, a doctor's prescrip- 
tion for dissolving gall stones, and 
complicated sotmach ailments. 



One box gives instant relief in all 
cases of GALL STONES, liver and 
stomach trouble, such as indigestion, 
dyspepsia, chronic appendicitis, gas, 
sour stomach, ulcers, catarrh, pains 
in stomach and back, constipation, 
etc. Don't wait but get a box of 
Sto-li-gal from your druggist today. 
Price $1. Attention! No fake tes- 
timonials, but positive facts. Sto-IL 
gal has helped thousands of people 
and it will positively give you relief 
in all ailments mentioned regardless 
of- your age or duration of trouble. 



Write for free literature to Dept. F. 
Digestive Chemical Company, St. 
Paul, Minn. Sold in Thief River 
Falls, by Dr. H. B. Newell, Lambert's 
Pharmacy, also leading druggists 
everywhere. 



CAMPHOR AND W1TCHHAZEL 

HELP WEAK EYES 

Thief River Falls people are aston- 
ished at the quick results produced 
by simple witehhazel, camphor, Hy- 
drastis, etc., as mixed in Lavoptik 
eye wash. In one : case of weak and 
near-sighted eyes a few days use brot 
great improvement. In another case 
it stopped eye pains and inflamma- 
tion. We. guarantee a small bottle 
of Xavoptik to help ANY CASE of 
weak, strained or inflamed eyes. 
- t-3 



NEWSPAPERS 

We will pay for a short time 

40c per Hundred 

for your old Newspapers, folded and bundled, also 

70c per Hundred 

for your old magazines. We will call for anything you are 
unable to bring to tbe office 

Thief River Hide & Fur Company 



It Is Just as 

DANGEROUS 

to be without adequate Tornedo insurance as it is 
fife insurance. In the majority of cases fire losses 
are not total but when a tornado strikes, it means 
. a total loss to- everything in its path. 

We have on display in our bank actual kodak 
pictures of the Fergus Falls tornado of last year 
which shows clearly the enormous destruction of 
property in that- town. 

Rates Extremely Nominal as follows: 
Dwelling houses and contents $4 per $1,000 ^or 3 rears 
Mercantile buildings and contents $5 per $1,000 for 3 years 

i 

First National Bank 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 
Resources Over One Million Dollars 






t M ** Morning «m)L»-. , 

Keep Your Eyes 

gloap -Clear ..* Healthy 



CLOSE 



Mon., July 5th 

In view of the fact that 
July 4th falls on Sunday the 
stores of Thief River Falls 
will be closed all day Monday 
July 5th in order that their 
employees may celebrate the 
day. 
Take notice and buy ac- 
cordingly on Saturday, 
July 3rd., 

MERCHANTS' 
ASSOCIATION 



i 



FRIDAY, JULY 2, joie 






ROSEWOpP 

The confirmation exercises of this 
i. years class were held! last Sunday 
i forenoon* at the Rindal church, un- 
der the lead of Rev. Geo. Larpon of 
Thief Kiver Falls. The church was 
filled, to capacity with over two 
hundred attendants, quite a number 
of whom came by ci.r from the 
neighboring cities and towns bring- 
ing dinner along and itteriding also 
^'ue communion services held in the 
afternoon. Rev. Larson delivered a 



• [J.*. 



.stirring sermon to the 
ence and the exercisels 
firmants gave proof of 
work and drilling, arid 
niendation to as weft 
tUbir leader. Ten pupils, four boys 
and six girls were confirmed^ 
A special meotin 



i 'lass and audi, 
by . the con- 
previous hard 
was a reeom- 
tihemselves. as 



of the New 
Solum farmers club was called at the 
Edgewood school hous! last : Saturday 
evening for the purpise of organiz- 
ing a community 'pott to growers as- 
sociation, to take ca'iej 

feting and storing of 
tato crop. 

The Rosewood Shir 
tion will' ship mixed stji 
wood again on Saturday, July 10. 
Those who were unfi rtunate in not 
having their orders in for. the ship- 
ment last Saturday may list their 
stock for the.next shi lment. 

■ '.•• Mr. and Mrs. Anton jRemmem and 
family from Thief River Fails, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Ole Xor lageii and fam 
ily from Xorden onq Mrs. Gullseth 



■ii_ 



as*" THE TRIBUNE 



Page 7 



COMING TO FAIR 



■I of Itho mar- 
tins fall's, po- 
ping Associa- 
ock from Rose- 



of Viking were Suudav visitors at the 
Anton Gnilsetli home 

A few auto loads of jtiie" local 
people atteiideif the tent meeting 
south of Viking last Sunday evening. 

Axel Blom. who is employed at 
the Loyd Crown fan l in .town of 
Rocksbury, spent Sun|d|iy at his home 
south of town. 

The Brandon, Bej-g ajid Xyhus 
families of Tliief Riy'cr Falls were 
■Sunday guests at the Swcri Swenson 
home. . , j ' 

Misses ,fflga and Esther Tlioreson 
o_£_ Thief River Falls Iwere in town 
last Sunday to attei (1 the confirma- 
tion of their sister, Alma, and to visit 
briefly with their permits: 

Miss Viola AxoVsoi , who is em- 
ployed at Black's sweet Shop, at 
Thief River Falls, was liome for a 




Citation for hearing on Petition for 
Administration. 

Estate of August O. Schneider 

State of Minnesota. County of Pen- 
nington in. Probate Court. 

In the matter of the. Estate of 
August O. Schneider, Decedent.- 

The State, of Minnesota. To The- 
r ssa Schneider and all persons in- 
terested in the granting of adminis- 
tration of the estate of said deced- 
ent: The petition of Theressa 
Schneider having been filed in this 
Court, representing that August O. 
Schneider, then a resident of the 
County of Pennington.- State of Min- 
nesota, died intestate 'on the 29th 
day of May 1020, and praying that 
letters of administration of his 
estate be granted to Nick Bundhund 
and the Court, having fixed the time 
and place for hearing said petition: 
THEREFORE. YOU AND EACH' OF 
YOU, are hereby cited and required 
to show cause, if any you have, be- 
fore this Court at the Probate Court 
Rooms in the Court House, in the 
City of Thief River Fall- in the 
County of Pennington, State of Min- 
nesota, on the 24th. day of July, 
1920, at Ten o'clock A. jr.. why 
said petition should not be granted. 

Witness, the Judge of said Court, 
and the seal of said Court, this 2ilth. 
day of June 1920. 

Ira. C. Richardson. 
(Court Seal) Probate Judge. 

J. M. Bishop 

Attorney for Petitioner 



M H M M H HHHHHIIHIIHHHtHmHHHHHM l H 



Look At It in Any Way 



folks 



.' visit with her 
' Saturday. 

Mrs. O. M. IIolsoli 
; Lilly, left Vast Wedijic 

f olden where the'y 
^-"friends over I he fourtli 



last Friday and 



The A. Andersoi 
and M. Dalstrinn faniilies from Wylie 
were in town a couple of-days last 
week to attend the 
and_to visit at the 

The Mission meet 
gregational church 
anil Thursday were 
tended at nil' meetiii 
thrtiout the sessioj 
The speaking miiiidf 
Segerstroni of Viki 



wi 



The Savages, who-come to the Pennington County Fair 
on August 4thr 5th and 6th 



program at 
grounds next 



well 



piis as 
friends, 
tend. 

The A. C, 
to Thief Hlvi 




our milk is the very best you 
can use in your household. 
First, because of its absolute 
purity and sanitary cleanli- 
ness. Next because of its 
superior richness and there- 
fore in nourishing quality. 
Finally- because in spite of 
its admitted superority in 
every way it will cost you 
no more to use it. Why not 
at least, then, give it a 
trial? 



t Thief River Co-Operative Creamery 
t Associaion 

t THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINN. 

MMKIHIH IMIHH It MHIHIHItMH + +-»-' 



/' 



M M t M »f MMM » M * M H H M M M H H MMMMM t t MMM 



the Rindal church 
Sunday afternoon, Jui> 



4, for the benefit 'of' this year's pu- 



as their relatives and 



Everybody is invited to at- 



and daughter, 
-'day for New- 
visit with 



JI. Potter:} >i 



:own Friday 
duess 1 tour. 



eve- 



holm of Teien anil Leiinard Lind- 
liolm of Jlinneapolis 

Bankers I. M. and Albert Jlyrbo, 
of Viking, were in 
.on a brief bii 

Thorn Iloi'ten re' urnoil last week 
■from Dcnnisoii. wl ere he has been 
to attend the fiinej 

Miss Throsia S< 
home last Wednec 

gh'am, Wnshingtcj 
"been employed at 
last two years and 
earned vacation w 
herb. 



Mrs. J. Sjolsvol( 
one! of the sma 
rived Saturday mol'iiin 
Bivler Falls and will 
neighbors north of 
da.MS. 

Mrs." Pettersmi 1< 
ing for Fiirg' 



ion meeting: 
\xeV Kron' home, 
gs at the C'on- 
Wcilneesday 
fair|y well at- 
: and the spirit 
was the best, 
were Revs. 
Finns Lind- 



Hrs. .Tohanne 
er Fall's has si 
town this iveek 



:ilj of his mother, 
derberg returned 
sday ! from Bell- 
where she has 
factory work the 
w|ill spend a well 
tli her parents 



accompanied by 

Dickon boys, nr- 

from Thief 

visit -with former 

town; for several 



Vorseth family motored 
r Falls Wednesday eve- 
ning to attei/d the Saetcrlagot stevnc 
at the auditorium. • 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Vorseth and 
daughter, Elsie and Joel -and Mary 
Shoberg spent Sunday evening at 
Viking "as guests with Mrs. J. Styr- 
luud. 

Mrs. .Tohapne Nyhus of Thief Riv- 
pent a few days 
..p.-.-k to attend the Mis- 
sion meetings and to visit with 
friends. j 

O. A. Flnnn, of Tliief River Fails 
returned home Friday evening, af- 
ter looking lfter his reai estate af- 
fairs. here fo: a few days. 

Mr. and Mrs Henry Whitehead 
and Edna liul Albin Rye of Mora, 
arrived here in car last Saturday for 
a short visit with the E, P. Johnson 
folks and k ter leave for Canada, 
where tlicy anticipate, making their 
future home. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Priehard ar- 
rived from I'hief River Falls last 
Sjaturday to look after their farm- 
ing interest? north o* town. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Blomberg and 
family arrived by ear from Crooks- 
ttm last Saturday and will spend a 
weeks vacation at the Haugen Bros, 
home. 



ft Tuesday morii- 



jfrcr visiting 



relatives here for 
_S.teincr Johnson 
ginning of last wt 
where, he had been 
the Norwegian Hal 
visit for a couple of 

A. Opseth has 
Johnson's forty aei 
ing this town on 
the intention to uy 
seth's and B. T '~-'-- 



with 



fveek. 

returned the be- 

eli ^Crurar Fargo 

attendance at 

rcnlaget and to 

weeks. 

purchased Steiner 

of hand adjoin- 

he cast and it is 

nvc both Mr. Op- 

Rahnni's residences to 



this land which hat 
residence location 
are now located, 
purchased a lot ir 
of town from B. P. 
move his rosidene 
as possible. 
' The Norwegian 
will stage an ice 



WET WEATHER HALTS 

GRASSHOPPER /MENACE 
The meiia ce of a 'hopper plague in 
western Minnesota has been greatly 
lessened, thjough not necessarily re- 
moved by frequent and heavy rain 



as the final returns from' several 
counties in the state have not re- 
ported to this office Nevertheless 
our records show that Minnesota has 
acquitted herself nobly by raising 
$420,070.21 in cash and pledges for 
the. suffering Armenians, for the year. 
1919-192I). 

A National Convention of all the 
state directors 'for the Near East Re- 
lief is now in session at the New- 
York headquarters. Before leaving 
for New York toilny t Dr. Westeuberg, 
state director for Minnesota and 
North Dakota expressed his opinion 
of tile new plan to be adopted for the 
coming years worK "People are 
tired of drives and the dollar sign, 
but they are still ready to respond 
to the cry of human needs thru dif- 
ferent channels," said Dr. Westeu- 
berg. Every county in Minnesota 
will be given a definite quota of or- 
phans to care for. ' Then if a county 
fails it will moan the are directly 
responsible for a certain number of 
deaths among these little children. 
In other words Minnesota's quota 
will be read in terms of human life 
instead of dollars and cents 
-- An extensive campaign for old 
clothes is now being carried on in 
all the churches, Sunday schools, 
young peoples societies, womens 
clubs, fraternal and social organiza- 
tions in the state, in an effort to al- 
leviate the suffering in Armenia this 
winter. This appeal for clothing is 
meeting a ready response from all 
classes of people. Jlany that were 
unable, to contribute money here-to- 
fore are now doing their bit in giving 
their old clothing. 



This is the 



of Universi y Farm, state entoinolo- 



;ist, who 1 



finding of A G. Ruggles 



as been making hives ti- 



Uions.in Minnesota, North Dakota, 
Manitoba lind Saskatchewan, Wet 



weather, says 
fungous disjeasc: 
of the insects. 



Mr. Ruggles. develops 

which, kill myriads 

Further wet weather, 



he says, sdrves ,to keep the insects 
close to tin ground where they can- 
not thrive I s usual. Again, the rank 
vegetation along road sides and in 
unfilled fields, where most of the 
'hoppers breed, is furnishing plenty 
of food for 



Nothing Alissed in Community Paper 
When the average person reads a 
magazine he reads the stories and 
when he gets the daily paper he reads 
the headlines. But when lie gets the 
community paper lie slouches down 
into a comfortable position anil reads 
every line from start to finish. After 
he reads it thru, he goes back over 
it to make sure he hasn't missed any- 
thing. — Watertown (S. D ) Herald. 



^ more preferable 
than I where they 
Mr. Johnson has 
the ieastern part 
Snginoen and will 
■ jtherepn as soon 

i I 
Parochial I schoof 

cream social and 



the young insects, and a 
trong movement toward cultivated 
fields is no 
MINNESOTA GIVES 

READY RESPONSE 
Minneapolis. June 28. — With but 
two days left to mark the close of 
the official year for the Near East 
Relief, gra ifying results have been 
accomplish id .thru the generosity of 
the people of Minnesota. At this 
time it is impossible to state the 
exact amount raised during the *yeat 



The One Food Above All 



Jti 



IS 



It is 
It is 



delicious 
wholesome 
absolutely the 



food to 



FRESH EVERY LAY 



MOTHER'S BREAD! 



■:*V;$* 



^iKiS 



be bought <today 



r.b^M&4^ti&&, ^i:K,^fa'6iiJ^i^#&l 



Clerk" of Court A. C. Swandby re- 
ports having issued marriage licenses 
! during the past week to the follow- 
ing parties: Car! H. Aas to Clara H. 
Knutson, Charles S. Christenson to 
Anna Abraliamson, Axel E. Knutson 
to Mathilda Olson, G. Henry Dipple 
to Adeline Carpented, Charles W. 
Lundquist to Elvira A. F. Larson, 
James Opsahl to Selma H. Hedquist, 
Albert Horter to Jane Ruch and Carl 
M. Svean ■ to Signe M. Swenson. — 
Warren Sheaf. 



only economical 



THEO QUALE 

Lawyer 

Practice in all Courts and B« 

fore U. S. Land Omce 

McGinn Building 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 



Wm. J. BROWN 

Lawyer 

Formerly County Attorney 

Marshall County 

Office Over First National Bank 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



Hemstitching 
MRS. MINNEY 

Scandia Block 
"Phone 252 
Hours 10 to, 12; 1 to 5 



Mdti&& 



HIGHEST CASH PRICES 
Paid for all Kinds 

o» -« : '* 

LIVE POULTRY 

at 

DeCremer's Meat 

Market 



Latest Patterns 
in Silverware 



We have just received a new ' 
shipment of Silverware in the 
famous Alvin pattern, the 
he's!, and highest grade silver- 
ware on the market. 
Come in and look these pat- 
terns over. They are ^priced 
right. 



A. A. Wangensteiii 

Jeweler 
Across from. Evelyn Hotel 



The Sun May Be Shining Bright 



«?:" 



;r TaiSi!ta3ii 




to-day and to-mirrow the 
worst storm in years may 
break. It's the same with 
the Are situation. You never 
can tell when the devouring 
element may devour your 
property and cause you irre- 
parable loss. There is only 
one sure protection — a policy 
of tire insurance in such 
strong companies as we rep- 
resent. If you arc not pro- 
tected, see us without delay. 
Don't let another night pass 
unless yoiuare covered. 



Lawrence Mtg. Co. 



215 Alain Ave. N- 



Phone 443 I 



)' 



iiUM II fH l iMIMII III UMMiUMHrttliMtitHM t H 



EMPIRE FARMS CO. 

Capital $25,000 

Lands Loans City Property Insurance 

Bring your business to us. 
We Promise courtesy and efficiency 

•!215 Main Ave; X. ' 

Tlione 443. 

Thief River. Palls, Minnesota 



Pound for pound the steels in a 

MAXWELL 

equal those in any car 




■ f 

The tendency in cars today is to 
\ reduce weight, to cut out unneces- 
sary pounds, to take those extra bur- 
dens off the power of an engine. In 
a Maxwell there is hardly a superflu- 
. ous pound. Like a great cross -coun- 
try runner it carries no handicap in 
weight. 

It is made of fine steels, and 
these steels have the combination 
■ weight and great extra strength. 
These steels are made to order 
for Maxwell. They are treated in 
great .furnaces and they are strong 
beyond belief . 



Pound for pound they equal the 
steels in any car built. 

But they more than repay for 
their higr cost. 

They wear. They stand terrific 
abuse they defy time. 

But their greatest task is to 
lighten the burden of the Maxwell 
engine, enable it to perform brilliant- 
ly, and make gasoline delivered ex- 
tended mileage. 

Thus you will understand tha^ 
rise of Maxwell the world over, that 
ever growing friendship. More than 
400,000 re in use tc-'l^y. 



Priehard Auto Go. 




fe&iift?'^ ; ~' 




Page Eight 



-A 



LacalNevSs? 



Mrs. It. Itupredht, of Fordviile', 
came' down Monday to visit with 



her parents for ai 

Mr; and Mrs. 
rived here Monday 
visiting with file 



Frances Holm 
day morning for N 



indefinite time. 

mer Mahteson ar- 

eveniug-, after 

la t tor's parents at 



No wf olden for the past .three weeks. 



en left last Mon- 
Hadock, where he 



will he employed pairing the summer 
months. 



nstrator at 
at &i Grdcery, on 
uid Tuesday. Bv- 



this city, returned 
• ning, after visitin 



. Sirs. Tom May 
home at St. 1'au 



There, will he 
the Simonsou. M( 
Friday, Saturday 
erybody' welcome. 

Mr. and- Mrs. Andrew "Johnson, of 



hpmCj Monday eve. 
; i'with friends and 



relatives in Alexandria | for the past 
two wcek> 



:ia left for her 
Mon/lay . evening, 



X. D.; for the past 

: i , ■ 

demonstrator at 



after visiting with ifriehds and rela- 
tives in Langton, 
two weeks. 

There, will be 
the Simonson SJtjat &, Grocery, on 
Friday, Saturday liid Tuesday. Ev- 
erybody welcome, j t | 

Miss Lydia-Cote, of [ St. Uaui, ar- 
rived here MonuYy where she will 
be the guest of _ ier brother, Philip 
Cot, for nn indefinite time. 

Mr. and Mrs J T.j Langhan ar- 
rived Jjere Monday I from Oklee, 
and will visit fo|r some" time with 
friends. 

Hazel Hansel 6t Red Lake Fads 
visited at the J. uphill home between 
trains Tuesday. 

There, will be 



demonstrator at 
the Simonson M<.at & Grocery, on 



Friday, Saturday 
erybody. welcome. 

Mrs. Theckla 
been visiting at 
her home at Holf: 
here, she was th 
Knutson home. 

' Mrs. K. Diili. 
Mabel, nf Creonbd: 
visiting at Minnea 
for .some time, re 
day. 

Mrs. (I. imhlci 
you ami Mrs. It 
Bteiner Monday w 
lit the Mike Comic 
Jefinite time. | 

Mrs. Martha Skramstad left for 
her home at Middle Hiver after re- 



md Tuesday. Ev- 

3mitlu who has 

VTexandria left for 

Tuesday. While 

guest at the O. 

and daughter, 

h, who have been 

>oi'is and St. Paul 

turned home Mon- 

Mrs. Julia John- 

Hedland left for 

1 ere they wh'I visit 

home for an in- 



THE TRBUNE 



THE ATTAS TRIO... 




after which light refreshments were 
yerved. 



at a 
Mrs. 



Mrs. T. ]A. Way entertained 
six o'clock^ dinner in honor of 
Dr. H. Hieber and her mother, Mrs. 
Parmley of Sioux Falls, last Thurs- 
day evening* 



Mr. and Urs. Abe Sapero pleas- 
antly entertained their employees at 
a six o'clock picnic dinner 'on Wed- 
esday evening, . June 30. The eve- 
ning was very much enjoyed by all 
present. 



FRIDAY, JULY 2, 1930 



Acrobatic Novelty Act that is sure to please all. Coming to the Big 
Pennington County Fair 



SOCIETY 



feinin 
ilay 



{•e.ivini; nit'ilicnr trjt' 
for a few weeks 

Harry and- M 
left for Steincr T 
will visit Willi the 
Rieilel for a few 

Mrs. Ii. Olson. 
Holt Tuesday, af 
of her sister, Mr 
past week. 

Misses Alice 
of Middle Kiv'er 



iitinent iii this' city 

l']lorence Baker 
ijesdiiy, where they 
1] Knuidfather, John 
days; 

ft for her home at 
or being the guest 
'} Kiiutsoji, for th«v 



ind Minnie Greslie 
shopped between 
trains here -on Tfiesday. 

arrived here Tues- j 
look] after Mattel's 
returned to St. Hi- 



Mylos Jackson 
day morning to 
of business. He 
laire the same da'y. j 

Mjss 1011a Bakke, who has been 



ninger-Wiener 

morning at :.')() at 
the Catholic church occurred the mar- 
riage of Miss Tillie Wiener, of Pen- 
nington cbunty, to Joe Hciiinger, of 
St. Paul. [ Miss Frances Wiener and 
Casper Wiener, sister and brother 'or 
the bride acted as witnesses. The 
bride woife a white net dress with 
Turned. ribbons and carried a beauti- 
ful bouquet of peonies and carna- 
tions. The' bridesmaid wore a blue 



georgette 



crepe over satin and car- 



ried a bouquet of pink carnations. 

Imnicdi itei'y after the ceremony 
they left for the bride's . home . in 
•Smiley, v here a five-course dinner 
was served to near relatives. 

The yo in; couple left Wednesday 
for St. Paul;- where Ihey'wi.l make 
their futu -o home. 

The many friends join in wishing 
them all the joys of a' happy wedded 
life. 



nations. 

Immediately after the ceremony 
the young couple left for Grygl'a 
where the groom • is engaged in 
fanning. The young couple were pre- 
sented witli many beautiful gifts. 
Their many friends wish them all 
the joy of a happy wedded life. ' 

The out of town guests were: Mr. 
and Mrs J. Haack of Minneapolis 
and Mr. and Mrs. R. Haack of 
Grygia: 



Airs. Sapero Entertains 
Mrs. Abe Sapero pleasantly enter- 
tained a number of ladies at a Bridge 
party on Tuesday afternoon, June 29, 
at her home, 223 Duluth avenue 
north. The tables were prettily dec- 
orated with white flowers and roses. 
The afternoon was spent in cards 



. . Swedish Ev. Mission Church. 

O. J. Lundell, Pastor. 
Sunday, July 4. Sunday school at 
10 a. m. No services. Mission meet- 
ings at St. Hilaire district as fol- 
lows: Services at East side school 
house June 30, at 2 and 8 p. 111. 
July 1st at 10 :30 a. m., 2 and S p. 111. 
At Black River July 2nd, Friday, at 
2 and 8 p. m. Saturday at 10:30 a. 
m. and 2 p. m. At St. Hilaire July 
3rd at 8 p. m. Sunday at 10 a. m., 
2 :30 and 8 p. m. A hearty invitation 
is extended to all to attend these 
meetings. 



232 or Hal Stanton. 30-2 pd 

FOR SALE. — MODERN 8 ROOM 
house. .716 LaBree ave. N 31-Tpd 

WANTED TO BUY OR RENT MOD- 
ern house. J. H. Kuecks, 621 La- 
Bree ave, Thief River Falls.31-lpd 

LOST— AUTO CASING, 33x4, COL- 
.or red, rim, inner tube. Black oil- 
cloth cover. Lost here in town. 
Notify .C. W. McDauiels 31-tf 

FOR SALE— SECOND HAND FOKD 
at a bargain. A. S. Holm, Rose- 
wood, Minn. 32-I 

BIG DANCE AT THE RINK THURS- 
day night. Good music and a good 



time assured. Everybody wel- 
come. ■ 32-1 

FOR SALE— CORNET — MASTER ' 
White, King model. Cheap if taken 
at once. Phone 213. 32-1 

HAVING TAKEN OVER HALSETIjt 
and Son's Painting Business, wo 

. are in a position to do first class 
painting and paper-hanging. All 
work guaranteed. Give us a trial. 
Bakken & Sherstad. Phone 5042 

■ or 21S. 32'-2tn 

FOR RENT— A MODERN T ROOM 
house. 410 .Duluth Ave. >'. C. W. 
Vorachek.' 



Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Rev. J. B. Smith, Pastor. ' 
Sunday school at 10 a. m. Morning 
service at 11 a. m. Epworth league 
at 7. p. m A special iuvitation is 
given to all to meet with us Sunday 
evening. Subject, "A man' with a 
Country. Evening service at 8 p. m. 



DR. SPOFFORD 
Optometrist 
Will be at Hotel Evelyn, Thief 
River Falls, Tuesday, July 13th. 
Afternoon only. 



WANT ADS 



WANTED — ASSISTANT LAUN- 
' dress at Physicians hospital. 

STRAYED— CAME TO OUR FARM 
on June 22 four red bull calves. 
Owner can have same by paying 
for the expense, of keeping and 
advertising. Sam Hauseby. Rose- 
Wood, Minn., 2i(, miles SW- of 
Rosewood on the Oeu farm. 

FOR SALE— 15 HEAD CHESTER 
White pigs, six weeks old. Priced 
at .$4 each. Ed Timm| Thief Riv- 
er Falls. 33-l'-pd 
FQR SALE— YOUNG HOLSTIEN 
cow. Good milker. Call at 415 
Horace avenue. 29tf 

LOST-ROAN MARE WITH WHITE 
front foot and black stripe down 
back. Weight about 900 lbs. Phone 



Service to Our 
Customers 



First, above all else, the customers of 
the Prichard Company, never need be 
fearful of not receiving the utmost service 
from anyone connected with it. The re- 
quirements of the customer' come first 
above all. 

When a sale of merchandise is made, 
the transaction is not. closed until every- 
thing is satisfactory to the customer.' Con- ■ 
sider this company one ready to fill any 
obligation or requirement. Ask questions, 
-you will receive the utmost in service or 
materials. 



The Prichard Co. 

Lumber and all Building Material 
"Order Your Coal Early" 



visiting with fi- 
at Grand Fork: 
(lay. . 

Tliovo. will be 
the Simonson \ 
Friday, Saturday 
erybody wo'.eoine 

Victor Truckman and 
Myrtle and Alia,, 



Monday, after \ 



•ends; and relatives 
: (.turned home Tues- 

t " I 

a demonstrator at 
feat & Grocery, on 

audi Tuesday. Ev- 



daughlers, 
arrived here Mon- 



day evening fropi Trail where they 
' forj the past week. 



have been visitin 

Mrs. Ed. Halmstrom arrived here 



isitjng for the past 



two weeks in Superior, and Duluth. 

Miss Mamie Zavoral, who has just 
finished teaching; a term of school 
near Melviu. ar-iveditaome Monday. 
Miss Anna Whrden, of Superior, 
arrived here Mo.iilnyjto'be the. guest, 
at the HolzniMiht. j and "Williams 
" homes- fm* about tjivo weeks. 

Miss Harriet lansOn and Dr. C. M. 

Larson returned jo Minneapolis Sun- 

~day morning af or a jtwo weeks visit 

with Mr. and -Vi|s'.. Nels Larson, 215 

K. Sixth street. 



bride, 
pink and 
spent in 
which a 1 



In Honor ofAtiss Sharboneau 

Mrs^Hmry Holt pi'easantly enter- 
tained a l. umber of friends at a par- 
sliov r er Wednesday evening, 
given in', lonor Of Miss Stella Shar- 
boneau, w ho will' soon become a 
The color scheme used was 
white. The evening was 
music and dancing after 
ght lunch, was served. 
Miss Sharboneau was the recip- 
ient of many beautiful gifts. Those 
present wjero: Misses Annie Aaspe- 
lund, Lillian Provencher, Belle Her- 
manson, Louise Majeres, Myrtle 
Blair, Jes; ie Barnett, Ann Doucet and 
Meidame!' Ann Dock, Lyle Manther, 
B. Bloom -piist, Julien Provencher, 
J. Biederi inn and Anna Ohm. 



ed 



cuit 
Con 



On W 
JI0, occ 
Stella 
Mrs. J. 11 
X.. to Ot 
presence 
The bride 
chine and 



ed the marriage of Miss 

uer, daughter of Mr. and 

Conner, 720 LaBree ave. 

d Haack, of Grygia, in the 

>f the immediate relatives. 

wore white silk crepe de 

carried a bouquet of ear- 




HAfVE YOUR 

i 

TE^TfeD AT 
EWELRY S' 



Haack-Conner 

ne^day afternoon, June. 



EYES 

NESET'S 

ORE 



Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 



OLAF NESET' 

Jeweler and Optometrist 






Chas. Lieberman's 



Money-Raising Sale 

The few items quoted here are only to remind you of the big 
bargains we have. You will find every article 
^ much reduced. 



Palm Beach Suits 

'Men's and young men's models. 

Genuine Palm Beach Suits. Latest 

patterns and models. 

$17.50 a suit 

Don't miss this opportunity! ' 



Extra! Notice! 

We are closing out the Beacon Shoe 

for less money than the factory can 

make them. Sale price— 

$4.75 per pair - 

Come early— they'll sell quick. 

U 



Lanpher Hats 



Big 



will' 



reduction. A hat that 
satisfy you, for only — 

$4.35 

CAPS! CAPS! We have too many- 
Come buy one at reduced prices. 

Men's Oxfords 

Black and Brown for men. Get in on 

this item now. At our. price they 

won't last long. ■ On sale at 

$4.50 - 

This is a snap! 



Sale Ofjens on Friday, July 2nd 

The Best Bargains in Town to Be Had Here 

CHAS. LIEBERMAN 



: - :<..*•-!■' ,•? ,.'.' ■ ' j--' -"' 4»ir^~:; i *'*ffig£ir : 1 , '"'IHfi 



•«< te 




VOL.20 No.. 34! 

. L_L i 



FAIR BOOSTERS 
PREDICT W& 




' <*£|--- I I 
ATTRAC1 . .,ifs GALORE SECUREb 
AND FINE HAIR IS ASSURED 

ALL I 



As the date draws nearer for the 
big Pennington coantyj fair interest 
.grows apace in generalj and from all 
Indications there is .every possibility 
of this year's fair being one of the 
largest and most helpful from an ed- 
ucational standpoint of ;any fair held 
by the county' in recent years. The 
industrial exhibit pf |thelschools alone 
is certain to be a mighty big and in- 
teresting exhibit. Suptj Ziegler, who 
is in charge of this exhibit, states 
that be has arrat gell an exhibit that 
will do the schO)ls|of jthe city full 
justice and whiel. will also be inter- 
esting to those who | watch the 
growth and prog-ess of our schools. 
The ladies of the countyj also are cer- 
tain to furnish some mighty fine ex- 



hibits for this year' 
these are all to be 
city auditorium, it 



s fair, and as 
exhibited in the 
positive no 



small amount of Jabor is going into 
this exhibit alonej in order to make 
the same full .of interest and beneficia' 
to the county generally. I 

Secretary Smith states that he now 
has the majority )f the! amusements 
all iued up and he is certain the fair 
this year is to present a line of at- 
tractions that will do justice to fairs 
many times larger. 'He has secured 
two airplane attract ons: that are us- 
ually given a the lkrger fairs, includ- 
ing the state fair*, and he is confi- 
dent that these t vo attractions are 
going to prove well ; worth the 
time and effort siiJir in bringing 



them to this city. 



a squad of airpla le 



the reputation of b 
is seldom equalled 
Lieut. Larabee, who 
plane while in mi 
his knees and (he 
chute, drop of liv 
while the. plane 
ly clip thru the clc 
the attractions' thu 



a great amount- of interest and en- 
thusiasm. ' ' 



The shows nil 1) 
of being high cla 
the ordinary and 



the fair board is t/f be congratulated. 

best is consid. 

for the people' ot 



Nothing but th 
ered good enough 

this county, and the! management of 

have endeavored 

the very best that 

fair. 



the fair this year 
to get nothing hut 
'exists for this year 



The Hying circus, 



daredevils, has 



dug a thriller that 
aid the stunts of 
walks " over the 
air, I hanging by 
making a para- 
thousand feet 
raveling at a live- 
uds, is also one of 
t is sure to create 



ear the reputation 
and better than 
this connection, 



It is more than likely 'there will be 
several high class attractions signed 
up vat the last, initiate, lis is always 
-~r .the* case, but in any event, and re- 
or not anything 



giirdless of whether 
further is signed vtpj this year is go- 
ing to see a mighty Hue fair and. one 



that will do the 
It is time for all 
for the big annua 



jld county proud, 
to begin planning 
event and to get 



behind the fair board aiid offer what 



assistance they cai 
fair with all their, 
to be a "regular" 
the interest of a!l 
given a boost at e 



To Avoid 

Elsewhere in tin 
bune is a warnin 
lice department to 



in the habit of swimming near the 
bridge and especial y those who swim 



under the bridge, 
tators on the bridg 
forth to w£tck the 
al near accidents 
by the- boys on 



, and to boost the 
night: It is going 
fair, land it is to 
that jthe same be 
•ery opportuuiy. 



Accidents 

issue of Tlie Tri- 
from: the city po- 
ajl' who have been 



causing the spec- 
) jto race back and 
swimmers. Sever- 
have-jbeen caused 
:he bridge racing 



from one side to the other to see the 
swimmers come under the bridge and 
it is for this reas>ri that the police 
department has taken the matter in 
their bands and is >ued this warning. 
Traffic across this bridge is usually 
heavy and it is impossible for tfibse 
driving, cars to tell when a lad is go- 
ing to Jash in front of the car, and it 
is the lesire of the police that the 
practice be discontinued at once. 



To Promote Pare Bred Stock 

The First National bank of Thief 
Eiver Falls is doing its utmost to pro- 
mote pure bred dairy stock in Pen- 
nington County by giving $50.00 in 
premium money a i veil! as a banquet 
to thelinembers of the 1 dairy calf 
club, mhie attent ing a: club meeting 
Mr. Hansen explt hied the value of 
such clubs and vrhy Pennington 
county| should havi i one of the 'strong, 
est clubs in the st ite. 

Much interest is jdisplayed by the 
youngsters and ei;hteen boys and 
girls bjave alreadj registered in the 
Farm Bureau office. | Their calves are 
being cared for in the best way pos 
sible and will present aj fine showing 
at the calf show h jlfl in! the fall. Any 
bpy or girl wishing to join should 
:o C. L. Hansen ol 



send their- names 

ithe First Nationil Bank: of Thief 



■Biver Jails or dire 
rfeau Office in the 



jtv'to the Farm Bu- 
;lty auditorium. 



It pays to advertise 



>:;<~.^&<nn??.-gi&tZiA 



in The Tribune. 



Th 
tin 






^ ^\^^\\' : i^r-y' ; y^.^ ' ^^y^- 




:UNE 



■ •'•STv^'Sp-. 



THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA. TUESDAY, JULY 6, 1920 



Official Paper of 'Pennington County 



1 'REUS VISITS CITY 



A. O. Preus, republican 
noiliinee for governor, visited 
ef Eiver Falls for a short 
e Saturday morning en- 
•oute for Greenbush, where 
he (was scheduled to make a 
fourth of July address. The 
Trjibune acknowledges a 
pleasant visit and we are. 
vetjy pleased! to . meet Mr: 
Preus. He is a very pleas- 
ant gentleman and one in 
whom the republicans of the 
state have made no mistake 
in selecting to carry the 
standard of the party. His 
vis t in this city was very 
she rt, but he says he intends 
to L'ome back again and get 
belter acquainted with the 
petple of this section. 






Lose to St. Hilaire 



TRIM PARK RIVER TEAM SATUR- 
DAY AND LOSE TO ST. 
HILAIftE-SUNDAY 



The Thief River ball team has been 
iudulgii g in some fast and furious 
games the past three days and in 
the games they have come 
off victirious and in others they have 
been bqaten badly. In Saturday's 
ith Park River, X. D.. played 
at Warden, they walloped the North 
Dakota team by a score of S to 16. 
Ami in view of the fact that the 
Park River team is an all salaried 
team, tjie credit of beating them is 
somethbig to boast of and to crow 
about. The nex day the locals journ- 
eyed dc ivu to St. Hilaire where they 
were taken into c.mp by a score of 
ii to '0. N'o explanation or excuses are 
offered for this defeat. They were 
simp".y >eaten by St. Hilaire and that 
is all tl ere is to it. St. Hilaire sim- 
ply outplayed the locals and as a re- 
sult cane off the winner. In the 
game S: onday at Middle River when 
St. Hilt ire p'.ayed that town, two of 
our pla rers. Brazil and Gradin.are 
given tl e credit for winning the game 
for Micelle River. Brazil and Gradin 
were hi -eel by the Midd'.MUvef team 
to play in the game Monday, and as 
the gai lc grew warmer, St. Hilaire 
forged ihead of their opponents and 
it lookc 1 for awhile as tho they were 
also go ng to trim the Middle River 
team. But toward the last Gradin 
connect >d with the ball and landed a 



single. 



Brazil then came to bat and 



knocked out a three bagger, scoring 
Gradin and thus winning the game 
for Mid lie River. This is a situation 
that is hard to comment upon with- 
out referring to the game the day be- 
fore when St. Hilaire trimmed the 
locals, and it might be said that it 
possible was thru a fluke that they 
managed to trim the locals, but it is 
mattet that is best passed over and 
iven the St. Hilaire team. 



credit gh 

PENNEY STORES 
'Tp LOCATE IN 
THIS CITY SOON 



SECURp LEASE ON DOBNER- 

MEEHAN BLOCK— TO OPEN 

AUGUST FIRST 



Another business institution is to 
be added to those now located in 
Thief ijiver Falls, the new firm be- 
ing the J. C. Penney stores. This 
company has hundreds of stores in 
different parts of the country and. 
are considered high class merchants 
in every town in which they are lo- 
cated. ] 

The store to loate here has secured 
a lease [on the Dobner-Meehan block, 
corner of Second and Main, and it is 
their pirn to get started by August 
first if possible. The biulding is to be 
remodeled considerably in order to 
make the rooms suitable and it is 
expected it will take some little time 
in order to get the rooms remodeled 
and it ih doubtful if the new firm will 
get started as soon as they hope foe. 
They have secured a lease of three 
years with the privilege of five, and 
it is the intention of the manage- 
ment, or this branch to make this 
one of i he very best stores. 

The aew firm will handle every- 
thing i i ready to wear, groceries, 
etc. T jey carry a complete line of 
ng and are considered mighty 



everyth 

keen competition by merchants -in 

other c 

stores. 



ties in which they have 
They carry a high grade line 
of mer rhandise and sell at a very 
close niirgin, and with their buying 
for sev iral hundred stores, they are 
able to secure goods at prices which 
would le hard to secure otherwise. • 



Ladit s' 
at Laird' 



Home Journal now. on sale 
s Specialty Shop. 



ktiM$^&T&Mf : 



THE SPIDER AND THE FLIES" 




DEMOCRATS 
j NOMINATE GOV. 
! COX OF OHIO 



AFTER LONG SESSION OHIO GOV- 
ERNOR NOMINATED ON 44th 
BALLOT 



CELEBRATE 
THE 4TH IN 
SANE MANNER 



PICNICS AND PARTIES ABOUND 

IN THIS LOCALITY ON "TWO 

DAY FOURTH" 



The "glorious fourth" has come 
and gone and was properly celebrated 
in a sane and safe fashion so far as 
Pennington county is concerned. 
Thief River Falls did not celebrate 
the day as it is commonly celebrated 
by a great many towns, but it is 
doubtful if others had a more enjoy- 
able and saner celebration. Picnica 
and neighborhood parties ' were the 
principal celebration of the two day 
fourth and with the occasional pop- 
ping of firecrackers in the hands of 
children, the day passed off orderly, 
and everyone enjoyed themselves in 
their own way and were ready at the 
close to hop back into the harness 
and start producing. 

A great many: of our citizens spent 
the day at other towns wbere cele- 
brations with all the noise and pomp 
possible to secure, w.ere spread be- 
fore the public with the information 
that there was plenty to go around 
and then some and for all to get in 
line and help. Middle River and 
Grygla were the only towns in this 
immediate vicinity that celebrated 
the day. Grygla celebrated Saturday 
and Middle River on Monday. The 
"celebration at Grygla was a success 
and a great crowd attended the big 
day with our neighbors. Then came 
Sunday and a rest was taken. Again 
on Monday the day was started out 
with attending the celebration at 
Middle River. This celebration was 
also a success and a large and en- 
thusiastic crowd was on hand early 
in the day to assist our neighbors on 
theh north make the eagle scream. 
The day at Middle River was full of 
fun and fireworks and everyone had 
a fine time. 

Many of our citizens made auto 
trips in different directions. A great 
many hiked into the country, otbers 
travelled to neighboring cities "just 
for the trip." Detroit was the scene 
9/ a great many visitors from this 
city, some driving and others taking 
the train. FJshing parties' without 
number were, also highly in fashion 
and many are the fish stories of the 
big ones caught and the larger ones 
which got away, that are now. being 
repeated for the benefit of those who 
were not so fortunate as to be where 
the fish were apparently the thick- 
est and -where they fairly jumped to 
get a- chance at the bait of the Isaac 
Waltons. 

The east side staged a celebration 
Monday evening for the benefit of 
the children who reside across the 
river. A large display of high class 
fireworks were, placed on the oppo- 
site banks of the river and in the 
evening the old and young alike 
watched with • interest while the 
rockets whizzed thru the air and the' 
stars sputtered in all directions. Ice 
cream was also part of the entertain- 
ment for the youngsters, and by no 
means the smallest. It was a glor- 
ious time for the kiddies and many 
of the older ones again became kids 
and enjoyed the treat along with the 
youngsters. . 

AH in all, this "fourth" was a hum- 
mer, and as proof of this we refer 
you to the kids of £ity. They know. 



Svare>Bye 

Melvin Svare 'and Betsy Bye, of 
Brie;- were united in -marriage at the 
Zion Lutheran parsonage July 2nd, 
Rev. George Larson officiated in the 
presence of Glen Svare-and Clara Bye. 



Pleasantly Entertains 

Mrs. Scott Laird very pleasantly 
entertained a party of fifteen of her 
lady friends last Friday afternoon at 
a launch party taken up the river for 
tbout live miles. The launch was 
preitily decbrated in out*' natdon'al 
colors and with flowers. During the 
trip a most delicious lunch was serv- 
ed and this unique party was, very 
much enjoyed by the ladie-. 



HARD WORK FOR 
ONE WEEK CAN 
WIN FINE PRIZE 



LAST WEEK OF FIRST PERIOD 

MAY DECIDE WINNER— ENDS 

SATURDAY NIGHT 



Now is the time to do your best 
work in The Tribune's great 33,600 
'automobile 1 campaign. Today' is the 
time to win — during the balance of 
this week you must win or lose, in 
the greatest prize race ever conducted 
in northern Minnesota. 

It's not a -question of work in the 
future — it's a question of work now. 
Next week, subscriptions will count 
you just one half as much, and it will 
be just twice as hard to get a winning 
lead. By next 'week, contestants in 
their last minute efforts during the 
remainder of the Big Vote period will 
have come into your territory and 
taken the subscriptions which should 
have been yours. By next week you 
can be so decisively beaten that there 
will not be any hope or chance for 
victory — by next week you can be so 
far distanced by hard working rivals 
that there will not be- any opportun- 
ity to gain a lead. Absolutely — now 
is the time that you must win I ! 

Go to the friends who promised 
you subscriptions — and get them. Go 
to the friends who promised to help 
you "when you needed it" — for you 
need -help now. Go back to those who 
subscribed once, and get them to fix- 
tend their subscription. In short — 
ca:i in every resource, draw on every 
supporter, work with all your might 
— and keep .it up until Saturday 
night at ten o'clock, when the First 
Period closes^ 

Make this last week count to the 
utmost. Give every moment of your 
time that you can possibly spare, to 
the work of getting subscriptions. 
Use the Farm Account Book to win 
for you, by securing long term sub- 
scriptions with .it and thus getting 
larger vote totals — as they can win, 
if you simply go to work and put up 
your very hardest work for the bal- 
ance of the campaign. 

Make an effort to better your own 
work. Try to get more subscriptions 
and more subscription cash into the 
offices of The Tribune during this 
week than during any other. . And 
keep trying — keep fighting — keep go- 
ing without letting up or giving in to 
any rival. 

Don't get discouraged. Every con. 
testant is going to work hard during 
last week — and every contestant is 
going o find it just as. hard as you 
to get ahead, at times. Every work- 
er has off days — days when things 
refuse to go right and wKexi subscrip- 
tions w'ill not come. B«t it's only 
the winning worker -Xvno has the 
stamina and the nerve-force to go 
ahead in spite of djffeat who can hope 
to win. 

. Tou — keep gorng. And — you'll 
win ! ! • Remember inly that this last 
week 'of the First Period is the most 
important week of the whole cam- 
paign—that during this week your 
fate must be decided. And, remem- 
bering this — -go to the work of win- 
ning with all your might-— -and win 
the Buick "Six"! You CAN win!! 

"MAKE IT. A -HOT. ONE"! 



BIG RESERVOIR 
PUNNED FOR 
LAKE DISTRICT 



The democratic convention a: San 
Francisco is over and .Tamos M. Cox, 
jrovernor of Ohio, was nominated on . 
tho 44th ballot at noon yesterday. 

The race was principally between 
the Cox forces ami the McAdoo back- 
ers and it looked for awhile as tho. 
McAdoo would win the nomination, 
but by hanging on and iightim: moth 
and toe nail, the L'ox forces succeed- 
ed in wearing down the McAdoo to- 
tal until they won the. dual two- 
thirds and the nomination. The Ions 
grind at the San Francisco convention 
gave every promise of being as drag- 
gy as the Baltimore eonventnm when, 
all records were broken fu the nomi- 
nation of President Wilson. It took 
'4G ballots at that convention to plana 
Mr. Wilson in nomination ami the 
present convention ran* a mighty dose 
second. The results of the balloting 
from the :!4th ballot to the i:'.r.l an? 
given below : / 

Thirty-fourth Ballot 

McAdoo. 4lMMo : Ox. :;T:"j : J 'aim- 
er. 1S4: Davis "»4 : Owens, ""-7 : riark, 
- ' •• . 

Thirty-fifth Ballot - ..v 

McAdoo. 4 mi; Cox. :\7r,i., : Palmer, 

2'2'2: l>avis. ;',[}; Owens. :;^'-; I'latk, 



IT IS CLAIMED PROPOSED LAT 

ERALS WILL RECLAIA1 A1UCH 

LOW LAND 



up the Uiearwater 
vers, win* exten- 



Members of the Ked Lake Drain- 
age and Conservancy district board, 
accompanied by Drainage Engineer 
George W. Walker. Thief River Falls, 
are making a trip up the 
and Red Lake Riv 
sive drainage improvements are con- 
templated. > 

The trip is being made with autos 
up to Red Lake, where, the outlet into 
Red River will be viewed. I'etitions 
have been approved by the drainage 
board for deepening, widening and 
straightening both Red Lake and 
Clear water Rivers. Upon the issu- 
ance of an order by Judge Andrew 
<.; rind el a mi of the District court for 
preiminary funds for expenses, the 
work of making a survey will pro- 
ceed. 

A great deal of interest is being 
taken, in the work because hundreds 
of thousands of acres of land needing 
better drainage will be greatly bene- 
fited when the propo-ed improve- 
ments are completed. 

The plan conteinphfted provides for 
Red I^ake being! made into a huge 
reservoir to stpre the surplus water 
during flood miriods until the rivers 
are able to canry it off. Added water 
power wi'.l ,res^ilt from this plan. 

The members of the board making 
the trip of inspection are. C. o. Sel- 
vig. "Crookston. president: Andrew 
Johnson, Gonvick; Axel Xelson. Holt: 
William Kaskewitz. Grygla: Kd Au- 
bol, St. Hilaire. and the attorney for 
the board, .0. E. Boughton of Red 
Lake Falls. It Is expected that three 
days will be consumed in going over 
the territory to be drained. 



Thirty-sixth Ballot 
J" 'McAdoo, 'AM; <Vx ;:77; Palmer, 
I1M1: Davis. US; Dwcn-:. l!f. ; ciar.-, 2. 
j thirty-seventh Ballot 

McAdoo. 4D. : ". : Cox. :;m; ; Pa'.mer, 
jiM):^; Davis no 1 -..: i )wcn<. ■:'.::. 
1 Thirty-eighth Ballot 

i McAdoo. 4051;. : Cx :;v:>., : ['aim- 
er. I'll: Davis .~n; owen-. :;::; riark, 
:j. 

thirty-Ninth Ballot 
McAdoo. \141): Cox. l*;^.,: Calmer, 
T4: Davis t\'.... 

Fortieth Bailot 
McAdoo. 4r,7; Cox. IWt: Palmer, 
l!l: Davis. 7(i. 
i Forty-first Ballot 

! McAdoo. 4i;n: Cox 4:>7 I J : Calmer, 
[ 12: Davis. n:p... 
I Fory-second Ballot 

j McAdoo. 4-J7; Cox. ">40i._ ; Pa "mer, 
S: Davis, 4'M.... 

Forty-third Ballot 
McAdoo. 410; Pox ."7U : Pa'mer,, 
7: Davis.T>7 1 -' J . 



Non Partisians to Meet 

The Nonpartisan Icafelic has culled 

■a meeting of its political workers 

(Wednesday in Minneapolis to decide 

I whether to phi'-e.a complete :i<-ket iii 

the fieid for Pic November genera! 

election. 

"Before -the primaries the farmer- 
labor party, fostered by ilw league, 
nominated a ticket for the. state 
offices, but as-therc were no contests 
the names of the candidate- did not 
go on the primary ballot. i 

League official- i:: a call sent out 
to ail league "bonsi.-r-"" asked for a 
conference to decide whether a new 
-ticket shall be Hied by -peiPion and 
thus p!a-e andidates in the mol, for 
every ottice in wh'n-li the i.-a^ne now 
has no'camlidate. 



Alan-ied. 

On July .'J. Albert Brokke and 
Selnia Nordin. of PUunmer. were 
united in marriage at the Presbyter- 
ian manse. Rev. K. L. Barackman 
officiating. They were accompanied 
by the. bride's brother and her friend. 
Miss Johnson. The bride was beau- 
tifully attired in white satin and full 
bridal veil and carried .a luxurious 
bouquet of roses. The young people 
go to Kewati to make their new 
home. Their many friends and ac- 
quaintances wish them bon voyage. 



On Road to Health 

A letter from Arthur Alues to 
friembi in the city and dated at 
Thomas hospital, Minneapolis, an- 
nounces him gaining in general coudi. 
tion and expecting to get away soon 
to- a southern location. This will be 
good and welcome news to the very 
large number of friends of Mr. AInes 
in this city. Arthur.Alnes is one of 
the byighest and best boys of Tnief 
River Falls. He attended the public 
schools here, and made an enviable 
record in all departments. Had all 
friends among his teachers and asso- 
ciates. He went to France with the 
A. E. F. and came home with a highly 
honorable record. We are certainly 
glad to know that this fine soldier 
boy is on the road to complete recov- 
ery and health. 



. Motor to Detroit 
Mr. and Mrs. Nels Christiansou 
motored to Detroit Saturday after- 
noon in their new Buick. Supt. Barn- 
ard's car was on the siding and a 
grand dinner awaited the arrival of 
the motorists. A fine day was en- 
joyed at the lakes on the Fourth, 
Mr. and- Mrs. ChrisHanson returning 
Monday. * 



Ladies Aid to Aleet 
The Ladies Aid of the Trinity 
Lutheran ' church will meet in the. 
church basement Thursday afternoon 
at ,'i 'o'clock, entertained by Mrs. II. 
S. Dahleti. Mrs. Lars Larson, Mrs. 
Chas. Shirley and Mrs. Targe Brokke. 



When In neeo: or" Job Printing 
hone The Tribune. — No. 3M. 



WOMEN OF PENNINGTON 

COUNTY, ATTENTION 



■It is especially ursmj that 
all women of Pennington 
county arrange to bring in 
as many exhibits tor the fair 
this year as ' possible In 
view of the. fact that (he 
Auditorium has been secure! 
for the display of all exhibits, 
it 'is certain that no damage 
will befall any article left 
on exhibit. The old buildiug 
formerly used on the fair 
grounds for these exhibits 
will not be used this year, 
and as building costs are pro- 
hibitive, it is ilTTpossble to 
build this year, and the Audi- 
torium has been secured for 
; this exhibit. Every article 
left on exhibition will be well 
taken care of. . Xo danger 
from - rain or du.-t will be 
possible and the ladies are 
especially urged to bring in 
their exhibits. This includes 
everythug in the .line of 
fancy work and art exhibits. 




r\ 



Page Two 



Automobile 



This column conducted by Autoinc 
bile Campaign Department, The Tri- 
bune. 



A, LITTLE 



incuts to sellin 
Tluit you liavc 



ADVICE 



The best preliminary argu- 



purchase it. 
out the good 
icle for sale, 

of time. — 



7] are these: 

Ij good thing, 

and that it has been advantag- 

' eous to others- to 

' You thus |)riiig 

points* of the art 

without any loss 

Shaw. I 

The .onljl -road to advance- 
ment is to do iymir work 
well lhat you are always ahead 
of your competitor'*. — Hamilton 
D. 'Maine: 

If thou dost lovo life, then do 
not squander time, for -that is 
the thing that life is made of. 
— Benjamin Franklin. 

Be Somebody , iji the Crowd 
—Make Yourself Count!!— 
Gollin,s. . . j 

I£ you work for a thihg — in 
heaven's name' work for it!! 
I believe that -you cannot 
achieve your ambition by work- 
ing for it part of j the time, or 
half-heartedly — you must work 
all the time with! all your might 
and keep it up all the time 
until you have i achieved your 
end. — Elbert Hubbard. 

He. who knows! that his power 
and his strength ;ai'e in is mind, 
and wlio will then seek to de- 
velop them and -use them as a 
^weapon for achievement — to 
hint conies all,_ ofj the best of 
life. — Thoreau. ; ! 

Nothing is impossible to In— 
Mostly. — i'eriaudei; of Corinth. 



;. -• -'-- 



■■>■■■■: -v,-~ .:*:^-v<./v 



THE TRIBUNE 



TUESDAY, JULY 6, 1920 



Campaign News. 



"LABOR WINS ALL. "--Tacitus 



as you CAN make, if you take- ad- 
vantage of.the great opportunity now 
presented to you. 

The Tiibune is willing to pay to 
you, or to any. other wide-awake per- 
son livin;' in the trade territory of 
Thief Hi\er Falls, a reward equiva- 
lent to si venty-five -dollars a day — 
FOR SPARE TI1IK WORK AT AN 
EASY OCCUPATION. 

Figure it out for yourse'.f: .Tho 
First Prii e offered in The Tribune's 
great $3,(00 automobile campaign is 
ti Buiek "Six" touring car, costing 
51.700.00 The Tribune is also giv- 
ing to wt rkers a list of prizes rang- ■ 
ing from an Overland "Four'', as 
second -grand prize, down to a prize 
of $25.00, in gold. 'The first prize, 
•an be yours if you 
rent campaign 

AND THERE'S NOTHING IN THE 
WORLD TO KEEP YOU FROM WIN- 
NING!! You can win this Buiek 
"Six." wijrtli $1,780. — or the equiva- 
lent of $75.00 a- day, more money 



of $25.00 in gold, 
the Buickj "Six," can 
win in Tl[e Tribune^ 



than any 
made in 



subscription solicitor ever 
his life in one day — AND 



MORE MONEY IN ALL, PROBA- 
BILITY THAN YOU YOURSELF 
ARE MAKING JUST NOW. All you 
have to co is to do your best work 
during this week — the last week of 
the First, or "Big Vote" Period of The 
Tribune's great prize campaign. All 
you need to do is to go in heart and 
soul — to York with all your might 
ALL THE TIME FOR SUBSCRIP- 
TION'S — i.ud keep it up until you 
know- tha: you have a winning vote 
reserve. 

YOU CAN DO IT — YOU CAN WIN 
THE II SUCK "SIX"— YOU CAN- 



EARN EI 
LARS IN 



iHTEEN HUNDRED DOL. 
FOUR WEEKS— IF YOU 



' LUCK-AND j WORK 

Is a "lucky man" really lucky'i 
. It is the habit of the average per- 
son, seeing someone who litis worked 
beside • him (iiiid hence for whose 
ability he has little respect.- climbing 



! START IfARD WORK AT ONCE. 
i GET yYiuk SUBSCRIPTIONS IN 
j TODAY 

j START] YOUR RACE FOR VOTES 
: W1T1IOU1' DELAY 



DON'T 1 BE TQ CONFIDENT 



ciil} him "lucky" 
orliT-r has jsntti'ii 
I mir 111 I- ate s 



toward tho top. t 
— 10" say .that tli 
tlit' hi'st of., tho ti 
awarding of .prize.;. 

And tho iioixm who is lucky 
usually well aware 'of tho fact that 
.it's NOT luck — but plain, hard, grind- 
ing work and constant effort, which 
has put him at the top. 

YOi:-''AX*T (IK'i: AHEAD IX THE 
WOULD. IF YOU ; SIMPLY WAIT 
FOR FOKTUXE TO 
AND TAP VOtr ONI'i 
— AXD XEOU'^'T T<> WORK YOUR 
HEI.F. The only .man who can win 



Lot us 
thru tho 
jrivat §." 



t'oii o'clock,. 110 subscriptions to count 
votes' can be turned in to count FIRST 
.PERIOD VOITES aftjer. that hour. 
Subscription orders may * 

to the offices ol rhe Automobile Ccui- 
paijrn Department. The Tribune, and 
will count FIRST PERIOD VOTES if 
POSTMARKED BEFORE TEX 
O'CI.OCltv SATURDAY XIGHT. JULY 
10th. In case, therefore, that /rou 
arc not able to come into th&<Jfflces 
in person, you may MAIL youKorder, 
taking especial care to see that your 
local postmaster postmarks it BE- 
FORE TEX O'CLOCK PLAIXLY. 
However, it is urged that you come 
in if -possible, for a conference with 
the manager about your Second 
Period rotes, and to get fresh sup- 
plies for the hard work that is to 
come. AXD— GET YOUR ORDERS 
IX AT ONCE. ■ 



suppose that you have, all 
progress of Tho Tribune's 
'tiOO automobile campaign. 



done good work for subscriptions. 
Dy that s meant that you have 
worked h u-d. for voles '.to get a lead 
which wi 1 win a car — that you have 
applied yjursolf closely to the. work 
■of gettin; into tho lead in the great 
prize ract. 
Now, 



COME ALONG 
HE SHOULDER 



j of the Fi -st Period 
j vote tot il. Very 
work has 



ho must be a 
whose labor 

the appearance. 

of endeavor. 
WORK AXD 



is the worker — and 
REAL workor-^-oiu 
consists not only in 
but in the actuality 
YOU'VE GOT TO 
WORK HARD IF: YOU WAXT TO 
GAIN' YUOR GOAL!! 
= Never \w this life can you get 
something for nothing — and only in 
a very few instances can you get 
smethnig for very 'little. THE TRI- 
BUNE'S GREAT §:.!J(iOO AUTOMO- 
BILE CAMPAIGN PRESENTS ONE 

SUCH INSTANCE. 
Some worker u 

car worth "$1.7!>MG 

work — for four we '1; 

thai tho end of tin 

near. 

about 

week days to the 

subscriptions to Th 

he equivalent to a i 

five dollars' a day; 

work. 

THAT PERSON CAN BE YOU 
No tine has yet pi'.ed up sufficient 

votes to win this ; t!ar, or any other 

of the prize- offered — prizes ranging 



oil come almost to the end 
with a strong 
probably, your 
been of such uniform suc- 
to convince you that you 
have, won — that you are hi the lead. 
You may even come to believe that 
YOU'RE BOUND TO WIN. 



NO SPECIAL 0FEERS 

THERE WILL BE, NO SPECIAL 
OFFERS OF ANY KIND IN THE 
TRIBUNE'S GREAT A AL'TOMOBILE 
CAMPAIGN. At no time will addi- 
tional votes, or special cash prizes, 
or special offers of any kind, be made. 
And at no time will the original vote 
scale or the original prize list be de- 
viated from or changed or altered in 
anv way. THE PRIZE LIST AND 
THE VOTE SCALE ANNOUNCED 
AT THE OPENING OF THE CAM- 
PAIGN ARE TO CONTINUE IN EF- 
FECT. 

• Therefore — it's mighty poor busi- 
ness for any contestant to hold back 
subscriptions, counting on another 
special vote offer or a special prize 
offer. It means merely a big loss in 
votes and a corresponding loss in 
power to win a car. to so delay your 
work and your remittances. And it 
means almost inevitable defeat for 
you to fail to get your biggest orders 
"in before the end of the First or "Big 
Vote" Period, Saturday night at ten 
o'clock. 

GET YOUR ORDERS IN AT ONCE 
— VXD MAKE THEM AS BIG AS 
YOU CAN. ONLY BY SO DOING 
CAN YOU HOPE TO WIN. ONLY 
BY WORKING HARD AND LONG 
FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS CAN YOU 
HOPE TO ACQUIRE THE VOTE RE- 
SERVE THAT WILL WIN. 

DO YOUR BEST WORK NOW— 
AND WIN A FINE CAR JULY 31. 



The next house I ran into some- 
thing I'd not so far found. A woman 
met me at the door, looked me up 
and down in quite the same fashion 
as that of a grand dame of London 
meeting a plebian from "the states" 
— utter contempt- and not a little 
distaste. 

"Well — whaddya want? Whaddya 
sellin' — soap or magarzines? Y'ain't 
colleciin' air yuh?" 
. "No, madam, I'm not collecting. 
I just came out here to see if you 
wouldn't care to subscribe for The 
World, for about two years;" - 

"Well — I don't know about that. 
Whaddya git outa it — ef'n I do sub- 
scribe fere yer paper? It ain't no surt 
of contest, is it?" 
, "Well — not exactly." I to'.d her. 
"You see, The World is going to give 
away three cars and some othet 
prizes to the people, that take sub- 
scriptions over a. term of eight weeks. 
The* fellow that turns in the most 
subscriptions gets the biggest car — 
and that's the one I'm working for." 

She began to smile, and I thought 
I had cinched the' sale — for to have 
a prospect smile is equivalent to ix 
promise of ease in selling. 

But my hopes were dashed when 
she burst f;nto a raucous laugh — 
throwing her head far back and 
venting shrill peal after peal of 
laughter. 

Yuh- — yuh — say, yuh poor inner- | 
cent child,_ do yuh really think yuh'U i 
ever git anyfhin' out of thetV Why 
— say, listen — don't yuh know them 
contests is all crooked? They ain't 
goin' U give yuh nothin.' an* yuh air 
plumb foolish ef'n yuh work for em!" 

"I'm afraid you don't understand 
me. madam," I countered, half angry, 
but also a trifle amused. Do you 
think for a minute that any paper 
as big as The World could afford to 
put over a graft like that? In tilt 
first place, they'd never, be able to 
get away with it — and besides that, i 
what would be the gain in it. A j 
newspaper don't li\e on subscriptions j 
— it lives on the advertising which ] 
those subscriptions bring — and the | 
only way they can get advortisin: 




CO-OPERATION 

DEHIND the average financial success will 
be found the close co-operation of a loyal, 
helpful bank. 

1 HE officers of this bank are particularly 
proud of its record in that respect. 



CITIZENS STATE BANK 



r™^-'-'^"*"' ifl aV e The Tribune come to your home 

i Continued on Page ill " 



uniMA. almM juma atlMtrtz. 



for Highest Possible SJjiality at 
Lowest Possible Price 



Mr. B. Busy Says 



DON'T DO IT! ! 

In this great prize nice, you can't 
be surt! at any time that you are the 
leader iul the* race. The standing .in 
Tlie Tribune gives you but little in- 
formation and you can secure infor- 
mation fr|oui no other source. For all 
you know, your nest rival may have 
three times as many votes as you. 
For' all you know, you may be far 
in the rear, rather than far iu the 
lead. 

DON'T BE TOO CONFIDENT!! 

Believe that you are going to win 
— yes. But 1 
WON — NO ! ! ! 

come as the result of three or four or 

live weeks of good work for sub' 

scriptiuns — it will conic after weeks 

day or more on i . uul mo „Jhs of hard and earnest ap- 

work of soliciting j j.iu-ntiou 

' ' YOU 



going to win 
for six weefc 
s. really, now 
•antpaigll is so 
This person: will have devoted 
t wo hour 



Tribune and will J 



ut believe that you HAVE 
Victory isn't going to 



eward of >eventy_ 
for these days of 



CAN'T BE TOO SURE OF 
VICTORY '.! No matter if you ARE 
iu the lead right now — you don't 
know that you will hold that same 
position tomorrow or next week. And 
no matter if you ARE far behind 
todav — you can, by doing your 
HARDEST AND MOST EFFICIENT 




YOUR B 



from a P.uick "Si^" worth ?1,790. | WORK 
to cash prizes of $2.1.00 each. YOU 
CAN TAKE YOUlt PICK OF ANY ! THE 
ONE OF THE PRIZES OFFERED— ! 
AND WIN IT!! 

AH yon need lo do is, to start hard 
work for subscriptions without delay. 
All you need to do in order to win the 
Buiek "Six" is to begin to work hard 
and long for subscriptions — at. once. 
Advertising, publicity of all sorts, 
supplies and helpful information, and 



FOR THF/ NEXT FOUR 
WEEKS] — leap into the lead. 

THING TO DO IS TO DO 
EST WORK ALL THE TIME 
RIGHT (UP TO THE END— WITH- 
OUT LAGGING AND WITHOUT 
CEASING. The only way to win is 
for you {to put in every possible mo- 
ment in HARD DETERMINED 
WORK for subscriptions. And you've 
got to KEEP IT UP ALL THE TIME. 
DON'T BE TOO CONFIDENT OF 



so on, will be given) you gladly by the; SUCCESS— OR TO AFRAID OF 
management of the automobile cam- 1 FAILURE. THERE'S NO DOUBT 
paign department.! YOU WILL BE ;■ BUT THAT YOU CAN WIN u YOU 
GIVEN EVERY FAIR 



You'll never catch up with tomor- 
row. Tlie fellow that waits for to- 
morrow to do his winning work usu- 
ally finds it mighty hard to live to- 
day. 

You can't hope to win when your 
work consists of hoping. Get out and 
put some life and some pep and some 
push into your work— -get out and 
show the ones you're fighting that 
there is.iu you a stronger will and a 
stronger power and a greater ability 
— ami you will achieve your goal. 

You've got to believe in your pro-' 
duct, if you want others to believe in 
it. Convince yourself — and then go 
about the work of convincing others. 



TO HELP YOU WIN A CAR. 

IN SHORT— THE TRIBUNE 
WILL HELP YOUJ IN EVERY POS- 
SIBLE WAY— WITH ABSOLUTELY 
NO OBLIGATIONS TO YOU. 

Start hard work i today — and win a 
ear on July 31st.' j . 

THIS IS YOUR' GREATEST OP- 
PORTUNITY. YOU DABE NOT 
SACRIFICE IT HJGET STARTED TO 
WORKING HARD TODAY— AND 
COME OUT ON JULY 31st WINNER 
OF THE BUICK f'SIX." 

"MAKE IT A HOT ONE!" 



ASSISTANCE DO WINNING WORK — BUT YOU 
MUST JVORK CONSTANTLY AND 
CONSISTENTLY TO DO SO. DON'T 
SLOW UP — DON'T LAG BEHIND 
BECAUSE OF OVER CONFIDENCE 
OR DESPONDENCY— JUST KEEP 
WORKING AND FIGHTING ALL 
THE TIME FOR THE VOTES THAT 
WILL WIN A CAR. 

KEEP Ur THE GOOD FIGHT- 



Y0UR OPPORTUNITY / 

How much money are you making? 

Very probably; j there are times 
when you average more than others 
— especially if you are a farmer or 
a merchant. ■ ' ■ 

At any rate 4-jyou're not making, 
as much money |ns you would like 
that's -certain — nor as much money 



AND W 



■ '{&ii,i;.;u 



N!! 



FHAL INSTRUCTIONS 

In or ler to take advantage of -the 
big vot >s offered on subscriptions 
turned n during this perid — GET 
YOUR SUBSCRIPTIONS IN AS 
EARLY AS POSSIBLE. First Period 
votes \ ill be allowed on all sub- 
scripts is orders which are brought 
into th> offices of the ^Automobile 
Campai ;n Department, in The Tri 
bune bi ildiag, before TEN O'CLOCK 
SATURDAY NIGHT, JULY, 10th: 
The dot rs will be closed promptly at 



WHERE THERE'S A 
WILL 

(Note: This true story of a 
young man's great success, un- 
aided by riches or influence, in 
a campaign exactly similar to 
that now being conducted by 
The Tribune, and written by 
that young man . several years 
ago, will appear in installments 
in this column during the pro- 
gress of The Tribune's great 
$3,600 campaign. READ IT — 
DON'T MISS IT — IT HAS 
MUCH IN IT FOR YOU.) 
(By Robert Douglas) 




Chapter Nine 

The next morning I started out at 
nine o'clock to drive over into the 
bottoms section — a section which I 
had noti yet touched to any great ex^ 
ent. It's the locality in which some 
of the best land in the middle west 
is located — as well as some of the 
worst. 

The first stop I made was at a 
little farm, just below Grant's Hill. 
An old woman, bent and shriveled, 
but smiling a most wonderful smile 
from beneath wind-blown grey hair, 
met me at the door. She talked a mo- 
ment and invited me in very court- 
eously. She was very nice— --told me 
all about the crops and the illness of 
her step daughter's pet dog and so 
on— and . ended up by giving me a 
subscription for a year. 



/ eff6red and 
a qood Loo£er 

That's Spur. The kindest gentlest, most- 
likable cigarette that ever was bred from the 
world's best. 

Blended in a new way that brings out that 
good tobacco taste. Crimped, too — not pasted 
— making a slower-burning, easier-drawing cig- 
arette: 

Everybody wants to move behind a winner. 
Spur cigarettes at 20 cents for 20 — colors brown 
and silver — are leaving the field behind. 

Smoke a Spur.. - Say it yourself: "Spurs 
win.*; 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco" C<£ 




are 




' '- tf 'W-»&^& ^fc^fe^^^^ 






:-^.--^-„ii£ 








j 




— . . 


.- , ,— *^.. 


■ 


5 ' T 

! 

1 
' j 



-~ < 



gf~ 



TUESDAY, 



■.v^'^.-WJnirs, 



JULY 6, 1920 



"37 ~^:?37'?^^|^5^?:^ 



'■*$ 



Where There's 
A Will 



Continued from Page 2 . 



to have the! good will and approval 
of every rdojder. You dont suppose 
they would iliave any desire to cut 
their own throats— and that is what 
it would be! (Perhaps you know more 
about it than I do— but I don't like 
to have the company I work for call- 
ed crooks-^and I'll' not stand for it! 
If you want to subscribe some time 
later— do. so. But I've no more time 
to waste, hearing my company and 
my work made fun of. Good day!!" 
and r jammed on my hat and startefl 
down toward the gate, where the roan 
mare pawed impatiently. 
^ "Say, youi g feller — turn hack here! 
Yuh ain't go: no call get I in' .sore like 
that. I just! wanted t' tease yuh a 
little. Tell' yuh what yuh do — wait 
a minnit' while I go an' get some 
money. I'll he right out ughi;— don't 
yuh go away .'" and she sped into the 
house after (he money for a sub- 
scription. . 

1 was dazed for a moment — dazed 
but happy. It hadn't been altogether 
a fake for me— I really was pretty 
sore, for a ninute, but now that my 
little lit of passion had brought such 
good results) — well, I WAS GLAD I 
HAD FOUND AN EXCUSE TO BE- 
COME AXGIIY. ABOUT SOME- 
THING! ... 

In a moment she was back, t'o 
press a couple of bills into my hand. 
"Gimme a roceof for two years" she 
said. "Yuh [eain't go back V town 
an' tell 'em I hain't got no manners, 



now — can yu 
I was too 



swun 

And the ir 
, merrily down ._._ 
the old Missouri 
good feed til 
the wheel of 
luxurious ear 
(To Be 



h?" 

happy just then to re- 



member ray anger, so I assured her 
very meekly that I wouldn't even 
think of sn<|h a thing — and wrote 
a receipt which she grasped in a iioho- 
too-elean ban 1, preparatory to return- 
ing to her wbrk. 

"Well— w> 1— say, younR feller— 
wish yuh luck— lots of it!!" and she 
back: into the house. 

win mare and I went 
I he sandy road toward 
-she certain of a 
ead- — I feeling already 
a huge, and gloriously 
between my hands. 
Contnued Friday) 



REA1EMBER— ONLY FIVE 
DAYS ARE LEFT OF THE 
FIRST OR "BIG VOTE" PER- 
I'OD OF THE TRIBUNE'S 
GREAT; $3,600 AUTOMO- 
BILE CAMPAIGN. THE PER- 
SON DOING THE BEST WORK 
DURING) fTHE REMAINDER 
OF THE WEEK WILL PROB- 
ABLY j^IN THE BUICK 
"SIX." MAKE THAT PER- 
SON YOURSELF— BY DOING 
YOUR BEST WORK TODAY! I 
GET IN EVERY SUBSCRIP- 
TION POSSIBLE BEFORE 
SATURDAY NIGHT!! "MAKE 
IT A HOT ONE"!!— AND 
WIN!!!! ; 



home 
shoppi 

Mrs 



SERVICE MAN KNOCKS OUT 

DEFENDER OF MRS O'HARE 



Whenton.^-While Sergeant Oden- 
borg. a student at the University of 
Minnesota and with his two brothers 
among the. first to enlist from Wheat- 
on at the outbreak of the war, was 
condemning tile release of Mrs. Kate 
Hichards O'Hifre in talking with a 
group of friends orf the street, a youn e 
man named Trotzke, said the 6'Hare 
woman was : right.' When the fuss 
was over, Trotzke Was taken to a 
doctor's office for -repair*. 



JiV^^"';'- 



THE TRIBUNE 



^rst Picture of Bemofefet^ T bn bating Their Candidate s 



Page Three 




tr.y i -w million-dollar Auditorium. Senator Robinson of Arkansas ^7n\mt chairman £w h« Jl «A°?£ de e f»*» f s £!f tat ° n ' a 
rt« *a giant electric amplifier, which carries the speaker ^^io™?co™TO™tebtehM In the SlSSSf^SS^A •' 
=.-«*. G e. sPa permen from all over the world. The various state delegation TSS a 1 thejpwnd i&ooi • uuoVwSsTS^ **^ * "" 



Harry Ahlberg left 'for his home 
at Strathcoila, after visiting herefor 
a few days. 

Miss Esther Rennet arrived from 
Vergas Wednesday, where she has 
been visiting with friends 'and rela- 
tives since last Friday.. 

Misses Lena Evenson. Theone 
Walker, Louise Majrres) C,ludv< \„. 
dersiui :aml Anna Brokke left last 
Wednesday for Iietmif. when.' they 
will spend -a couple of woel;* ,autp- 
111; at the lake. 

Miss (llg;i (;,.fl-,-i,> of Crcenl.u^h K.ft 
•I hursdny f„ r Superior, wheri- *lf wi't 
Visit fiends for a i-ouple i.f w.-ek--. 

Mrs. Allan Sund Iefi 'for her h..me 
near Argyle. afler visit!;,- with 
friends in .this hi v. 

Mrs. Itole.l A r«..n and son 'left 

for Roseau Thursday \rn-u- rhev will 
attend tin- fair. 

Miss Ella Peters. 11. who h U s i, 0C a 
visiting wiilr her sisler. at Xeiisvale, 
relurned home Thiufs.lay. 

Mrs. Ivor JU.nroo I, t'i for her home 
at Brnuson Thursday morning after 
visiting hen- for the pasi two weeks. 

-Misses Aloilie anil Alice Paulson 

returned Wednesday evening from 

■I Warren, where the former received 

medical .treatment. 
I Miss Shirley Hiung.du left for 
Alvarado Thursday, v.-hor'e she will 
he employed for an indeiiniie lime. 

Miss Nora Kylin left I'-r her home 
■it .Alvarado after visiting hero with 
friends and relatives- for a few days, 
j .Tosepk Mossby left for his home 
j at-Fairdale afler visiting with friends 
land relatives here for the past .'• 
[ weeks. 

I Mr. and Mis. .7. L. p.eaii left last 
i Wednesday morning for Wisconsin 
I where 1 hey will visit friends and rcl- 
] aiives for about two weeks. 



local Ne^fe? 



Misi Anna Dobson, of Hazel, left 
for L'ojli, Wisconsin, where she will 
visit fir an iudeiinite. time witn 
friend* and relatives. 

G. L. Steenerson and daugh- 
Id 1, who have been visiting at 
en and Minneapolis, returned 



Chursday evening. 



Mr.- 
tei 

lira at 
home 



Mrs. R. A. Preston returned to her 
at Plummer on Thursday after 
here between trains. 

•s. C. Knutson, of Russel, _pass- 
ed thri here Thursday enroute to 
Glenwood where she will visit friends 
and relitives for an indefinite time. 

Mrs. L. M. Halvorson of Plummer 
shopped here Thursday between 



KXaLMADKFES 



trains. 

Carl Gustafson, of Viking, arrived 
here Tl ursday where he will be em- 
ployed. 

Mrs. Ed. Larson, or Hazel, returned 
home Thursday after visiting with 
friends and relatives in this city for 
the pas : week. 

Charles Dostal, who has been 
employed at Hibbing, returned home 
to visit here for a few days. 

Lemly Dobson returned home to 
Hazel Inst Thursday after visiting 
here for a few days. 

Mrs. P. O. Bogg and children left 
for South Haven last Thursday where 
they wi 1 visit for a few days with 
friends and relatives. 



Mrs. M. Baldwin and children, of 
Itollet, X. D., passed thru here en- 
route to points in southern Minne- 
sota, to visit for some time with 
relatives and friends. 

Mrs. R. Bartley, of Minneapolis, 
arrived the first of the week to visit 
with .her daughter, Mr. H. D. Keenes, 
for several weeks. 

Arthur Lenierson left for Alvarado 
last Friday morning where he win 
he employed. 

Mrs. R. Paulson and daughter, No- 
riue, left for Fairdale for an extended 
visit. 

John Williams went to Warren 
Friday -to attend to matters of busi- 
ness. 



Miss' Edna Miller left last Thurs- 
day for Crookston where she will 
visit her grandmother for a few days. 

Mrs. Carl E. Johnson and son, Gar- 
dian. of this city, left Wednesday 
evening for Winnipeg, Canada, to 
visit with the former's parents. 

Richard Lund returned to this 
city Wednesday, after spending the 
past two months visiting at different 
points in 'Canada. 

Charles and Louis Stein of Good- 
ridge visited with friends in. this 
city Thursday. 

-Mrs. Pat Drool left for Grand 
Forks Thursday to visit for an iu- 
deiinite time. 

Misses Emma Ptacek and Xena 
Horton, of Mavie, visited with the 



latter's brother, Willie, norton. who 
is n patient at the Physicians lios- ! 
pilal this week. j 

i 

Miss Lulu Allen and sisler, of St. ' 

Hilaire arrived here Thursday morn- j 

ing and shopped between trains. ] 

Mrs. Fred Flody and sister. Miss I 
Bertha, arrived here Thursday morn- 
ing 10 be guests at the. Andrew ; 
Ilaiigen home for a few days. 

Mrs. Henry Evenson 'left for her 
home at Warrond, after visiting with 
friends and relatives in this city for 
the past week. 

Mrs. S. Funk and children left for 
Badger Thursday morning to visit 
with friends for a few days. 

Miss Esther Miller left for Middle 
River where she will be the guest of 
her sister, for a couple of weeks. 



He's -as Good as Dead 

Lexington Herald: Now thai .\l'e\. 
o's new president has been .-worn 
i" it's up to the f.-miiiy to go ahead 
with the funeral arrair-'i-nicnls-. 



Faults Common To All 
On the whole we make too much of 
faults. Faults? The greatest of faults 
1 should- say, is to. have none. 




When you advertise, you go halt 
way. There's a Hurting place for the, 
seller Jiuci the buyer or real estate. 
This.meeting place is in the classified 
advertising columns of tiiis paper. 
The owner is represented by his ad- 
vertisement. The prospective buyer 
turns to these columns — and if the 
ad enlists his inlerst the transaction 
is under way. 



Hanson & Barzen 

Wheat, No. i northern, perbu. 
Wheat, No. 2. northern, per bu. 
Wheat, No. 3' northern, per bu. 
Wheat, No. 4 northern, per bu. 
Wheat, No. 5: northern, per bu. 
Durum wheat, 
Durum wheat, 
Durum' wheat, 
Durum wheat, 
Durum wheat, 
Oats, per. bid 
Rye, per bu. 
Barley,, per bu 
Flax, No. 1, iper bu. 
-Flax, No. 2, per bu. 
Bran, per ewt[ 
Shorts, per cwt 



No. 


1, 


per bu. 


No. 





per bu. 


No. 


3, 


per bu. 


No. 


4, 


per bu. 


No. 


0, 


per bu. 



2.51 
2.46 
2.41 
2,21 
2.12 
2.4G 
2.43 
2.38 
2.31 
2.27 
.98 
1.9G 
1.10 
3.43 
3.21 
3.38 
3.00 



Bees' Antiseptic. 
Bees s ick up the nectar, which does 
not pass into their stomach but into 
an expansion of the oesophngus. There 
It undergoes a partial chemical trans- 
formation, under the Influence of a sub- 
stance cilled invertase, which acts as 
a ferment. When the bee disgorges 
the honey into the wax cells it dis- 
charges a little invertase at the same 
time, and before closing the cell a 
of venum from the bee's sting 
. this to prevent fermentation. 
"Thus," says Bonnier, "the bees in- 
vented aitiseptics before Pasteur or 
* It is this drop of poison that 



Lister!" 



preserves! the honey for years. 




The Charm of Pretty 
Furniture is Lasting 



□ B 

m 



Tessum SeedJ Grain & supply Co. 



3.70 
365 
1.50 
3.10 
4.60 



-Cracked Corn, per cwt 
Whole corn, per cwt. 
Hay, per bali 
Middlings, per cwt. 
Oil meal 

- Thief River Produce Co. 

Hens, light, per lb ,14 

Heavy hens, per lb m i8 

- Boosters, per lib ,10 

Turkeys, per It) ' .18 

Horse hides : .03@.05 

Calf hides .15 

Horse hides .04 to .05 

Eggs, per doz. ! .30 

T.R. Co-Operatlve Creamery 

Butter, per lb 57 

Butterfat, per lb '57 

Milk, per quart [ lu 



Gold 
Horseshoes 

E*Pfnte i» not efficiency. 
Ifon[tpayforgoldhoneslioe* 
when you buy your printing. 

Sensible printing on sensible 
Pnpw— Hammermill Bond 
will save you money and 
get results for you. 

"That is the kind of work we 
do And the kind of paper 

we use. 

Use More Printed 
Satesminsnip. Ask ha 



r. 



Your selection from our 
assortment of better furni- 
ture will bring this charm 
to your home. 



LARSON'S 



MAIN AT THIRD 






.1 t u * 5 



<f 



Page Four 



The Tribune 

SEMI-WEEKLY 



ESTABLISHED 1061 



Official County Paper 



Pennington Printing 'Company 
Publishers ' 



Neither was 



by the marual worker, but by the 
brain of the thinker. Ifwenadnoth 



ThoB. A. Way, President 



the modern 
ganization, 
possible tlK 



labor as in 



Published every .Tuesday and Friday I ventor, the 
at 
Tbiet Birer Falls, Minn. 



; ty, which 



_ _ „ _„„ .,,.,, . „ , labor, it wiuld destroy the very ad' 

B. B. McWllliams, I Editor and Manager i- .' .J 

*■ vantages it 

Bolslievi: 



" Foreign-Advertising Representative 
THE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 



Entered as second class matter at tbe 
poBt office at Tblelj River Fails, Minn., 
uider tbe Act of Marcb 3, 1879. 



1 I 

JJL 



'*i^inwi3m z 



■ -Mii 



„.„..«„„.,-„,» 



TUESDAY, JULY 6, ioacr, 



created nor maintained 



Nolle' of .the ' iMmesofa^eiegates 
or alternates gained fame ' for. the 
state by a position high np in the 



ing but manjaal work we should all he Ifreak columns of the daily press. 



living in eaves and reed huts. It Is 
invention, rot the movement of the 
hands in lal or that creates wealth on 
scale. It Is invention, 6r- 
and capital which makes 
comforts of modern lift 
of which labor is demanding and re- 
ceiving a ii rger and larger share. If 
Russia, destroyed the in- 
organizer, the right to 



private projerty and individual liber- 



ire men's incentive to 



' ■■ ■*.-,. ^*, 



That's a gain. 



' ORGANIZATION OF IGNORANCE 

Chicago Tribune.: "No intellectual 
man above the class of the laborer 
in intelligence, is given an opportun- 
ity to go to the polls' 2 in Russia, says 
John Clayton, "unless nb is a member 
of the communist party." 

By killing off a large proportion of 
those who did not agree with them, 
by starving, terrorizing and depriv- 
ing others of their right to speak, 
write, or vote in opposition; the bol- 
shevik leaders have maintained their 
government, with the help, latterly, 
of ill-advised external pressure which 
forced all patriotic Russians to unite 
against invasion and dismemberment. 
' The basic tactic | of bolshevism is 
the organization ofj ignorance. That 
part of the Russian people wh*o have 
least knowledge and loastj mental 
capacity, are organized by the Lenine- 
Trotzky group by appealing to their 
simple desires, to their fear and sus- 
picions, to their class feeling. They 
were promised peace 1 , land and bread. 
That was easy to Understand. Then 
followed the slaughter of opponents 
of the bolshevik leaders, suppression, 
regimentation of labor, iron dicipline. 
The ignorant masses could not deal 
with their loaders. Counter leaders 
were destroyed. Discussion was 
abolished.. A red guard of zealots 
enforced obedience. iForeign invasion 
excused military organization. 

All this time the bolshevik leaders 
assert and doubtless helieve is on be- 
half of the Russian • people and of 
human progress. TJiey hold to the 
Marxian doctrine that the manual 
worker produces all jwealth. There- 
fore they Justify the[ abolition of the 
bourgeoisie and of the intellectuals, 
except those who subscribe to their 
ideas. 

This is the threat of bolshevism to 
civilization and hriman 



is seeking. 

m is a denial of the facts 
of human progress. By trying to de- 
stroy the thinkers and the directors 
it is turning men back to the stage 
from which they have worked their 
way thru tjges of, thought. No such 
destroying Philosophy has even risen 
among men. The human race must 
work forward by the control of the 
brain over the hands, not by the en- 
slavement of the brain by the hands. 



The steam roller fir*n osslfiedjlan- 
tiquated and o&olete^iecp of crude 
find forgotten i^ehiS^y.'-'compairea 
.with';' the neV'veieetrift air: cooled! at 
Sail Francisco," ''as demonstrated, at 
; thj'- convention/ It was noiseless, 
,bSt hot wireless. In fact It was con- 
nected to wires ' from Washington. 
^Bven so it was a one man machine, 
and it rolled, pressed, cleaned and 
Jaid 'em away. 

It took the democrats nine day9 
and forty-four ballots to do it. No 
wonder they felt a yearning for a 
liquor man. 



With the nomination of Cox by the 
democrats we are; wondering how the 
temperance advocates and new orator 
women on the pay roll of the demo- 
cratic party will enjoy their place as 
attorneys for the defense. 



Hon. Wi liam Howard Taft in Min- 
neapolis Tribune.. 

The Xeague is Socialist, unpatriotic, 
anti-Amerifcan, despotic, dishonest in 
its methods and lives only because of 
the totallylblind prejudice and ignor- 
ance of the great body of its support- 
ers. It may be successful today but 
it contains] the seeds of its own de- 
struction. The sooner the victory 
over it the less injury it can do. 

May the I. V. A. win today. 

We can understand now why the 
Times wa! such a roaring Taft ad- 
herent wh;n we were sending dele- 
gates and an occasional alternate to 
the Chicago convention. 



The democrats in convention at 
San Franei ,co treated- the liquor ques- 
tion with :ontempt.' They were di- 
vded in seitiment, therefore on this 
great public question they said noth- 
ing. 



W. J. Bryan received all applause 
and no si pport at the convention. 
His numerous platform amendments 
on the great public questions of the 
day were presented with eloquence, 
received with applause and put thru 



the blower 
alacrity at 



and into the discard with 
d dispatch 



Mr. Bryan yielded ten minutes 
time "to that snappy little Welsh 
woman" Mrs. Peter Olson and she 
proceeded to lambast the Nonparti- 
san league for the defeat of Volstead. 
Mrs. Olsoi . . brought Minnesota con- 
to the front on many oc- 




lang 



IN the 
piped 
mother 
, a necessity 



ice 






Because Ice Cream 



. Why? 
test 
ing food 



the 



uage of the slangi 
mouthful, when 
cream was "not a 



isf "Willie 
he told his 
luxury— but 



IS 



Food 



Good \ wholesome food, carrying the butter 
fat of thick, rich frozen cream. Fuel for the 
engine. We all need it. 

Home consumption of ice cream has in- 
creased vitually 100 per cent in America 
in the last two years. 



Because Ice Cream has stood the 
pure food test — as a health-build- 
Order today — brick or packed. 



Puritas Ice Cream 




THE PART TIME JOB 

These are 'the "days of the part- 
time worker. There never has been 
a period in the' history of the coun- 
try when there were so many open- 
ings for people of this class. City in- 
dustries of all sorts are advertising 
for men and women who can give 
a few hours a week or a day. Farm- 
ers and their wives would! gladly 
avail themselves of such assistance. 

Ifor the .woman who wishes to 
make a little extra money there are 
many openings and in arranging her 
own work to provide the hours, of 
freedom ecessary for the part time 
task she will acquire new efficiency 
in tile administration of her house- 
hold. 

The man whose regular work does 
not iil! all his time, or who wishes 
to add to his income will And farm 
work, either for the entire summer 
or for a part of each week, crying 

•ud to £& 3oiljS< He will find rail- 
roads panting for men to help out 
Industries with hooks to be set in 
order and garden and lawn work 
without end. And in the outside 
hourly job he may find the thing 
which he has been seeking all thru 
ids business career, the thing for 
which he is best fitted and in which 
he will attain success. 

The lazy or snobbsh will find little 
solution for their difficulties in the 
present situation, but the industri- 
ous person who sees the job as a 
means $o an jend, has today the 
chance of his life. 



NO TANIC IMPENDS 
Pessimists who croak prophecies 
of a "panic" or serious slump in busi- 
ness may do well to consider tlie 
steel industry, accepted as the baro- 
meter of business conditions gener- 
ally. The United States Steel Cor- 
poration reports that it has on its 
books at the present time about 20,- 
000.000 tons of unfilled orders. That 
is the largest volume of orders the 
Steel Trust ever had at one time ex- 
cept in July, '1917, when it was over- 
whelmed witli war orders. The total 
is mounting up right along; it in- 
creased nearly 000,000 tons last 
month. If not one new order were 
received, the Steel Trust would bt 
kept busy for a year or more filling 
these orders. The. independent steel 
companies are said to be in a simlar 
situation. ' 

• A market that is ordering stee'. in 
vast and increasing quantities is not 
a panic market, not a depressed 
market. The depression is so often 
mentioned that it seems to be a su- 
perficial fear not based on solid facts. 
The nation wants steel, .the basic 
commodity, and. wants other com- 
modities of all kinds, in Digger quan- 
tities than ever before, and will take 
years to get "fed up" with them. 
There is no overproduction, and none 
in prospect— nothing but over "con- 
sumption, until that still distant time 
when the waste of war shall have 
been fully made up. 

Business lias been handicapped 
lately by transportation difficulties, 
and in some lines by excessive prices. 
Improvement is being made. As the 
freight blockades arc cleared, pro- 
duction will speed on, and with in- 
creased- production will come a still 
greater volume of new orders. The 
market may sag temporarily, in this 
or that trade section, largely as a 
protest against exorbitant prices and 
profits. The general, al'.-round na- 
tional market does not. sag, and will 
not, if manufacturers and dealers 
play fair with the public. 



Zion Lutheran Church. 

George Larson. Pastor 
Service at 11 a. hi. Evening ser- 
vice S p. in. Prayer meeting every 
Wednesday, evening at S p. m. Ladies 
aidiat Goodridge Wednesday, the 
14tH, at 2 p. m. Zion Ladies aid in 
the city Thursday, the 15th, 2 p. nu 
Mis-. Wollen entertains. Bethlehem 
ladies aid at Mi's. Trockman's Friday, 
the 16th, -at 2 p. in. Bethlehem con- 
gregation will give a church picnic 
at Sani Groveh's Sunday July 17, 2 
p. m. Ice. cream and coffee will be 
served.: , ' ■ '' 



m* 




Sedan Convenience 
at Low Cost 

Overland Sedan Averages 27.6 MileB Per 
Gallon in Los-Anflet-Yosemite Run 



THE OVERLAND SEDAN is proving to owners 
everywhere the advantages of closed-car summer 
motoring. A permanent top keeps off sun and rain; 
plate glass windows shut out wind and dust. And 
now the 355 mile Los Angeles- Yosemite Economy 
Run shows remarkable fuel average of 27.6 miles 
per gallon — a striking endorsement of this Sedan's 
economy and the riding qualities of Triplex Springs. 



Northwestern Auto Co. * 

. K. A. Sundahl, Prop. 



• • 



.Tribune Want Ads Get Results... 





(Patented) 

Keystone Silos Stand Winter's Supreme Test 

BETTER YOUR FARM—SAVE YOUR WASTE—BUILD A SILO THIS YEAR 



Where Mystery Reigns 
Biggs — What do you usally eat in 

this restaurant? 

Higgs — Don't ask me. ask the cook. 

I simply order from the menu. 

,,— .Natural; ;, Affinity . . 
"Why is it that widow seems to at- 
tract the horsey element? 

"Probably because .... she is a grass 
-widow." ■ ;.' .. 



FILLING HOLE 

Large size — galvanized frame — 
hinged. Place where wanted. 
Heavy: rilfbfed wire glass cover, 
admits light. No broken gi'ass can 
fall into feed. 

M0RTARLESS JOINTS 

Xo mortar joints in a -Keystone 

silo. 

Joints are sealed with cement wash 

after wall is built. 

THREE WALLS IN A KEYSTONE 
Outside Skin — waterproofed ce- 
ment wash. 

Concrete Block — uontaining steel 
reinforcing. 

Inside Skin — -waterproof cement 
wash. 

This makes a dry wall and a 
warm wali becuse it's dry. 

THREE INCHES THICK 
Thick enough for strength. 
Thin enough that wall will warm 
quickly when the sun shines In 
' cold weather. 

Bottom of pit level with top- of 
foundation leaves silo wail from 
bottom- to top without projections 
to interfere witii silage settling 

■ uniformly. 

3 to i CONCRETE 
-Keystone Blocks are made of 3 
parts .of clean sand and gravel and 
1 part Portland cement. 
Always factory made and cured. 



*s#K 




rtOOP STRENGTH— REINFORCING 

.'!-S in. strel rods, bedded in con- 
crete, i-in-H' this si)d from bottom 
to lop. 

These hoops are seven inches a- 
part. 

Proper hoop- strength means a 
successful silo. 

THE STEEL RAFTERS 

One ouch two feel «arry the weight 
of this concrete 1 roof ami' reinforce 
ir. 

Eire — Wind — Rattle Proof — Per- 
manent. Keeps our* coli] — retains 
natural sii'n^o heat. 

DOOR SYSTEA1 

PRIDE OF THE KEYSTONE SILO 
Each door ;i unit. 1 1 in ire ami 
ladder combined. 
Locks op'*n automatically. 
Refrigerator type seal. I'-pi'y Eed-"- 
wood doors — paper insulated. 
Redwood resists lire ;tnd rot. 
Sinirlo simple hn-k. Impossible to 
accidentally lock yorsolf in. 

\ STEEL RODS PROTECTED 
~j All reinforcing is buried in concrete. 
. ■-;] A Keystone si!o is bum like "Sky- 
.j scrapers'' and large concrete 
.7 bridges. 

J Hoop style reinfoi.-in- of steel 
ijvc bolted securely to the heavy 
cast iron door frame. 
Pour hoops fasten to each door 
frame casting. 
Strength where strength -houid be. 



CONCRETE AND STEEL from TOP to BOTTOM 

We Build Them Complete on Your Farm 

BUILT TO SAVE THE CROP THAT NEVER FAILS 



RAMBECK-STONE CO. 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



..iu^u .'sii-^X'^^iE^i^^UitS£li^iS^^^l^>i-!iid 






• - t' " • 



.,,..,^_JU,„.. 



TUESDAY, JULY 6, 1930 



■■ , - 1; >'\ : -.' -":"' •*'"^^'Ic? 7 i^ ? !^ *^V-i^ ; ~£V\- *.^^ ^*N"r^ ■-. • ' ■ ' :• 



»«*»««« 



1 




The first 
campaign being 
night at 10 o' 
tance should 
scription possib. 
of the remaining 



f AT CRITICAL 

Big Vote Period Will End Saturday at 10 P. M. 

INSTRUCTIONS-IMPORTANT 



of the vote scale in the $3,600 automobile 
conducted by The Tribune will end Saturday 
-' July 10th. All candidates and their assis- 
imber the importance of getting every sub- 
e in before that time, in order to take advantage 
J days of the "Big Vote" period. 



Period votes on 
clssely to the fo 



This does not mean however, that votes given on subscrip- 
tions turned in during the first period must be turned in and- 
published; it is only necessary to get your subscriptions in 
before midnight! on Saturday, if you wish to receive votes on 
them at the present schedule. No contestant is obliged to have 
the votes thus sjecured published, but instead they can be with- 
held even to the closing day of the great race. To receive First 
their subscriptions all candidates must adhere 
lowing instructions: 

FIRST— Car didates may call personally at the office of the 
Manager, Automobile Campaign Department, to turn in sub- 
tcriptions, at any time up to midnight Saturday. (Note:-Offices 
of campaign department are located at The Tribune Building.) 

SECOND 
office can MAIL 
on Saturday, 
votes will be credited 
that they were 



, 



•Candidates who cannot CALL at the Manager's 
their subscriptions at any time up to midnight 
When these subscriptions arrive, First Period 
edited on them— PROVIDED the post mark shows 
mailed before 10 P. M. July 10th. 



Remember these instructions. Bear in mind that midnight 
of Saturday is the hour. With the passing of the First Period 
will go the schedule of votes that has prevailed since the be- 
ginning .of the prize campaign. This means that Uere you 
now gel : 50 000 votes on a three year subscription, you will, after 
midnight of Saturday, obtain 25,000 Votes for the same sub- 
scription-should you choose to hold it until the Second Period 
During the Second Period this decrease will be proportionate on 
on all subscriptions. Every subscription turned in before the 
end of the First Period means BIG VOTES -AND YOU NEED 
VOTES. 

During the remaining days of this week is- the time for 
every bit of work you can do. You can't afford to slow up for 
one minute!! 

; See that your work keeps pace with, and beats, that of your 
rivals. Exert your strongest efforts in securing subscriptions 
The votes received for them will make you a winner Get them 
now while they are offered in largest numbers. Turn your sub- 
scriptions in this week. You will never have a better oppor- 
tunity for getting votes during the campaign. There will be no ■ 
special vote offers— subscriptions now earn as much as they 
will at any time. 

Get all the subscriptions you can at once. 



_> 



Standing of Contestants 



Dis 



Mrs. Lawrence 



Robert; Halvors on, City .. 
Leo Miller, Ci 



rict Number One 



Harry Lund, ijity _ 230,000 

Mrs. Edwin O. Erickson, City. -..203,000 

O.L. Cronstron , City ._ 220,000 

Miss. Agnes Cftedahl, City .• 10,000 

-.10,000 



Hermanson, City 



Mrs. Henry Sa: idee, E.F.D., City 
Julius Liden, R.F.D., City. _.... 



-170,000 
... 10,000 
.... 10,000 
... 10,000 



Mrs. Thomas R( wan, City ... 175,000 

Luella Peterson, City. ". .. _ (joqOO 

Mrs. H. F. Boreen, City 10 000 



One hundred and tw 
the worker iu each 
in his district.' ■ 
Seventy five dollars ii 
district who secures 
district. 

Sixty live dollars in ( 
district who secures 
Fifty dollars in cash 
trict who secures the 
Twenty five dollars in 
district who secures 



District Prizes 

onty five dollars in cash will-be given to 
district who secures the highes vote tot il 



cash will be given to the worker in each 
the second . highest vote total in his 



tie 



ash will he given to the worker in each 
third highest vote total in his district. 

vill be given to the. worker in each dis- 

fourth highest vote total in his district. 

cash will be given to the worker in each 
fifth highest vote total in his district. 



t'io 



Standing of Contestants 

District Number Two 

Betty Johnson, Holt _ 00,000 

Sylvia Pierson, St. Hilaire 2:i0,00i> • 

Olive Wing, Middle River ....... , : 10,000 

Martha Albin, Plummer .../..... '. ;..' 123,000 

Ethel Anderson, Wylie 75,000 

Lorraine O'Hara, Newfolden , 10,000 

William Novak, Wylie .: 10>000 

Borghild Berg, Middle River _ .... io,000 

Bertha Olson, Middle River in,00O 

Mrs. E. Singer, Erie _ : 210,0.00 

Guilder Tviet, Golden Valley 00,000 

Arthur Olson, Middle River 10,000 

Emma Anderson, Middle River _ ...10,000 

B.O.Norby, Goodridge no.000 

Anna Knudson, Kratka •_ in qqo 

Lawrence Rierson, Box 672,Holt in_00O 

Mrs. C. E. Lundgr™, Viking ' 00.000 

Capital Prizes 

The Buick "Six" touring car will be awarded to tli,. can „,. 

>u any district who secures more votes than any other randi- 
dates in all districts. 

The Overland -Four" touring ear will be awarded to the ,...„„ii- 
date in any district who secures the second largest number 
of votes in air districts. ' 



Turn in your subscriptions 
value of all subscriptions. V< 
Therefore you must liave all 
again will such a chance to 
WORKING and WIN!! 



V 



Votes Will Determine the Prize Winners 

isweek. Only by so doing can you hope to win. For, on Saturday, the first period ends -and after Saturday comes a fiftv n, ,Y • , 

jotes wii. win-you know that-and you also know that it is going' to take A LARGE NUMBER OF ^71 "\ 

^votes you can get-right nowl! Never ,g, n during , e race ^^^^^CZZ~^i 
>-M up a strong vote reserve heaven to yo. Now is the time when you must win or iose! G ? t al. the subscriptions you can 1 ^ KE E P 



thi 



bjfld 



iiaafe^^a&kt^^Hi 



a^iliw^-iKiiJti i^itl*. 



•Page ITiye 







AMERICAS BEST COIL 



GOES 10 




EUROPE PAYING $11.50 NET TON, 
LAR BETTER AND GETS COAL 
ALWAYS READY To| BID DOL- 



I 



IWoMinuteTaucsToAmericans. 



nca 




Association. 



Hampton Roads. — Practically the 

entire outinit' of. rocahontas, West 
Virginia Splint anil Kentucky Block 
coal is flowing east for export thru 
Hampton Heads and ' other Atlantic 
ports. I / 

"The movement is : so great that 
these three, the highest grades of 
American domestic coals, have vir- 
tually disappeared from the domestic 
market and cannot bej bought by 
Americans at a price within reason. 
No matter how big [the American 
retailer bids, the exporter goes him a 
.dollar better — and gets the ccal. 

The expert drain ifi particularly 
strong on the output bf Pocahontas 
mini's and the nii»es>around Fair- 
mont and New tttver. ^.Va. To get 
this cream of American - coal, ex- 
porters are paying as high as $11.50 
a net ton, with correspondingly high- 
er prices for Pennsylvania anthra- 
cite. •': J 

Coal jobbers say that if this price 
were cut in half, lliejoperators would 
' still be getting a fa rj price. 

The heavy export demand sots the 
1 price pace for the American who buys 
in the domestic market. 

Americans either pay the export 
tprice or don't get their orders lillea 
i at the mines, for the; demand for coal 
at Tidewater is now unlimited. Ex- 
porters are taking every ton they 
can get. ! 

No matter how scarce coal is, no 
matter how scarce coal cars .are, the 
exporter's order is tilled first. 

These export shipments, as . they 
flow east, have clogged the railroads 
so that New England] mills have run 
up an S. O. S. signal. They want 
,' some of this' coal [diverted from 
Hampton Roads and other points and 
hauled into New England. 
I Senator Walsh of j Massachusetts, 
Ms demanding embargo of some form 
on coal exports. He points to Eng- 
land, which has recently clamped on 
the lid by limiting coal exports to 10 
per cent of her total! production, tho 
in 1913-1914 England exported 34 



out of every 100 tons of coal from 
her mines.! 

England} according to Walsh, is 
keeping .liar coal at home, then buy- 
ing American coal and using it as a 
medium of exchange for acquiring 
Cuban sugtr, Argentine beef and raw 
materials from Mediterranean coun- 
tries 

Walsh las compiled figures show- 
ing that atout 2;000,000 tons of coal 
were shipi ed ou'tof the United States 
during April. His information from 
coal men s that by mid-summer the 
export shi iments may be as high as 
4,000,000 tons a month. 

This would be at a yearly rate of 
48,000,000 tons. In other words, out 
of every 1 1 tons of coal mined in the 
United States, one would be exported. 

Americans- who want this coal, but 

against the export price, 

that as the coal shortage 

acute every ton taken from 

market and shipped 

increasingly greater. 



can't bid 
point out 
gets more 
the domestic 
abroad ix 
drain. 
Canada 




is a bis factor in our coal- 
export market. Her mines supply 
only 41 per cent of her coal needs, 
1920 she will probably buy 
000,000 tons of American 



and 

about 22 
coal. 

Canada has thousands of Ameri 
can coal ;ars which she is holding as 
hostages until American railroads lo- 
cate and send home other cars that 
belong ii Canada but haven't been 
returned to her. 

Attempts to get these gondola and 
hopper, coal cars back to the United 
States will apparently be ineffectual 
until our railroad congestion is un- 
raveled and an exchange can be made. 
Coal jobbers say consumers will 
pay at least $6 a ton more for theii 
winter's [coal if present alarming' con- 
ditions continue. 

There I are 5,000. operators, with 
about 7,,000 mines. Many of these 
are getting no cars, and making lit- 
tle or no profit. 

Others, favored, by the railrbads, 
and get ing some cars, are taking 
profits in a few weeks that reach, in 
extreme eases., as high as 75 to 10O 
per cent oi their total capital in- 
vested. 



RECKLESS WASTE AND SPENDING 

By Johu H. Rich, Prominent Financier, Chairman Federal Reserve 
Bank, Minneapolis. 

With living' costs at the highest point since the close of 
the Civil War, and with the general public indulging in 
a prolonged period of reckless extravagance; the' time 
has come when sober-minded men must stop thinking in 
general terms. They must consider the present situation 
from the standpoint of personal and individual responsi 
bility, if the dangers in the near future that should be 
readily apparent to every one, are to be avoided. 

"Social unrest arises from many cause's, hut mostly I 
think from the commonplace fact that it takes about 
everything the average man can make to keep pace with 
the outgo. This unrest, which is provocative of labor 
troubles, the slacking up of individual production, care- 
lessness about money spending, and. many other evils, has, 
I hope, reached its high point. It is easily evident that 
it cannot spread very much further without CTeat danger to the whole country. 
"It has been habitual to associate unrest more, with the laboring clasres 
than with other classes of the public. Nowhere in the United States is unrest 
more acute or bitter feeling more prevalent than among the agricultural popu- 
lation in the Ninth Reserve district. Since the beginning of the war farmers 
have been under heavy pressure to attain the highest possible production. 
They have been enjoying the highest prices that have ever prevailed in the 
Northwest, yet there is widespread dissatisfaction and complaint. 

"Part of this is due to vicious propaganda based on false economics which 
has been spiead through all the farming districts. The farmers have been de- 
liberately misled and have not had the benefit of corrective education at the 
hands of those competent to tell the truth about the economic problems that 
are serious to the agricultural class. Part of this is due to the feeling of sur- 
prise and bitterness upon realizing that while enjoying high prices, their an- 
ticipated profits have been cut by rising costs. The two influences combined 
have made many thousands of men who have ordinarily been clear and level 
headed in their views, critical and antagonistic toward their governmert. and 
bitterly hostile toward business interests at the larger centers which they have 
been led to believe are antagonistic toward them. A division between country 
and city would be one of the most unfortunate things that could happen. 

"Those who have the confidence of the farmers can do Ore latter a genuine 
service and perform a service to IhMr country in annihilating the false doc- 
trine that has been spread, about. The causes of complaint should be analyzed 
and' identified, and if they rest upon injustice these should be ruthlessly elim- 
inated. To a certain extent, the farmer, like every one else, must work out his 
own salvation, but the community, as a whole, is seriously at fault, if it per- 
mits the farmer, because of his isolation and his lack of close contact with 
other sections of- the public, to become the victim of either those -who are radi- 
cal progandiste for profit or those who are propagandists because they hate 
their government, and who are seeking to overturn the very foundation stones 
upon which the truest and best democracy in the world is founded. 

"The general rubric do not recognize the significance of the warning sign* 
that are apparent in present conditions. ther.> is no way of avoiding a situa- 
tion which undoubtedly contains elements which simply invite disaster." 



EMPIRE FARMS CO. 

Capital $25,000 

Lands Loans City Property Insurance 

Bring your business to us. 
1 We Promise courtesy and efficiency 

215 Main Ave. N. 
; : 'Phone 443 
Thief River Palls,- Minnesota 



Legion Old Army Name 

z The first "American* Legion" was 
founded in 1792, and ' its existence, 
' by that name, terminated in 1796. 
War department records show that 
when the regular army was reorgan- 
ized in 1792, following the Revolu- 
tionary war it was first officially 
; designated the "I.egi'on" and was di- 
vided into fojir "smb-legions," of 
.which the-4th United States infantry 
was a 'part. ' j 

The idea of designating the United 
Slates army as the legion originated 
with General Knoj;, Secretary of war 
under George Washington. The army 
was patterned after! "the Roman le- 
gion, the old military organization 
under which Julius | Caesar and his 
successors conquered as much of the 
wor'.'d as was theh known. 

The American "Legion" was com- 
manded by Gen. : Anthony Wayne 
' ("Mad Anthony") and was organized 
under his dit-ectioiJ at Pittsburgh, 
l'a.. in. May 1792. President Wash- 
ington ^ instructed Ifieneral Wayne 
' "do not spare powder and lead, so 
that the men be :njade marksmen." 
The Legion fought its only battle as 
a legion at Miami lltapids in the 
Kentueky-Ohio-Indhln country -Aug. 
20, 1794, engaging a force of hostile 
Indians. In 179C,j it having been 
decided that the Roman formation 
was not suitable for) fighting Indians, 
the Legion was disbanded and reor : 
ganized into four regiments of in 
fantry. 



"BEAUTIFYING THE COUNTRY 
HOME WITH ADVERTISING SIGNS 



K0RN5BY"Y0TjNGEST0F 
MAJORS' BIG STARS 



etc. Dbn't wait but get a box of 
Sto-H-gal from your druggist today. 
Price?!. Attention! No fake, tes- 
timonials, but positive facts. Sto-li- 
gal has helped thousands of people 
and it 'fill positively give you relief 
in all ailments mentioned regardless 
of your age or duration of trouble. 
Write for free literature to Dept. F. 
Digestive Chemical Company, St. 
Paul, Minn. Sold in Thief River 
Falls, by Dr. H. B. Newell, Lambert's 
Pharmacy, also leading druggists 
everywhere. 



Wait!-- Don't Operate! 



Take Sto-li.gal, 
tion for dissolving 



complicated sotmach ailments. 



JUNIOR CLUB WORK 

BOON TO ALIEN-BORN 



making 
shows 



doctor's prescrip- 
gall stones, and 



One box gives Instant relief In all 
cases of GALL STJ0NES, liver and 
stomach trouble, such as indigestion, 
dyspepsia, chronic appendicitis, , gas, 
-sour stomach, ulcers, catarrh, pains 
in stomach and back, constipation, 



Writ ng «to the state club head- 
quarter » at University Farm, a wo- 
man w 10 has served as judge at the 
recent Koochiching county bread- 
contest at International Falls 
liow boys' and girls' club 
work i ; helping foreign born people 
to be better American Citizens. She 
says : 

"let nnot half tell what club work, 
means to the people up here. The 
best . loaf of bread in Class B was 
made by a little Austrian girl who 
never iiad white bread in her home 
until she had the contest work in 
school There were three of these 
little Austrian girls from the same 
school. They drove 30 miles with 
an ox team to reach the railroad. 
They 1 ad never seen a train before, 
or an < lectric light or a moving pic- 
ture sh >w. They stayed in an Amer- 
ican h<tel in a real American bed and 
wore r ightgowns for the first' time. 
The gowns had been made in school 
under the direction of the teacher 
They could scarcely sleep, their 
teachei said, for thinking how funny 
they looked in their long white robes. 
One of these girls made the best 
bread. You are doing a won- 
derful work for the foreign homes- of 
northei n Minnesota. 



"Beautifying" country homes with 
advertising signs no longer is ap- 
preciated by the dwellers of the 
country. Such -"decorations," while 
lending color to the landscape, are 
not regarded as works of art by most 
farmers, who have come to discurage 
the use of barns and shade trees as 
a background for flaring signs telling 
the virtues of wares. 

An utter disregard for shade trees 
is shown by those who have tacked 
up signs of all. kinds, sizes and 
descriptions. Apparently tjhe sign j 
man lias no regard for the trees that 
beautify the country roads. It would 
only be doing justice to all who per- 
sist in using trees for this purpose 
to destroy every sign, so attached, 
in the opinion of the county farm 
bureau. Wounds made by use of 
small nails and spikes and tacks 
cause dead and decayed cavities to 
form, resulting in a great amount of 
damage later, possibly shortening tht 
life of the tree. 

Signs here their place and should 
be kept there within reason. The use 
of fence posts to tack signs on is to 
be discouraged as it has the effect 
of making the farm home look like 
a junk yard. The painting of large 
signs on roofs and side walls of' 
barns, and outbuildings cheapens the 
sui fundings. , 

How can the farm owner, asks 
the country bureau, make headway 
in beautifying his place when dozens 
of signs adorn his doorway or main 
highway along his place? What 
would happen if the sign posting 
iiabit became general in the resi- 
dence districts of Thief River Falls? 
How many firms pay to place their 
advertising along the highway? Any. 
one may admire taste in sign adver- 
tising but the advertising should be 
placed with regard for surroundings. 



:-:. .:•■-. ■ ••= ■/.-,-'- !ti.-:oaKSn 




Thief River Tire Shop 

The home of PENNSLYVANIA TIRES 

Expert Vulcanizing' and Tire Repairing 
Tire Accessories 



W. A. CLAY, PROPRIETOR 

313 Main .Ave. North 



l'.O: 



WILSON FREES SOCIALIST 

SENTENCED AS WAR SPY 



e:'3 Hornsby, brilliant in- 
jur and batsman with the St. 
.;s Nationals, is the youngest 
the "big league" baseball 
rs. He was bora at Winters, 
as. April 26, 1S90 — now being 
1 2 1 yeirs old. He has starred 



WOMAN'S CASE AMAZES 

THIEF RIVER FALLS 



New York. — A pardon signed by 
President Wilson was received by 
Marshal James M. Pojver for Morris j^ an j wea £ 
Zncker, a Brooklyn dentists and So- 
cialist, convicted in 1918 for viola- 
tion of- the. espionage act and sentenc- 
ed to serve 15 years, in the federal 
prison at Atlanta. Zncker appealed 
his case and had never served-TTSy 
tiriie in prison. 




It pays to advertise in The Tribune. 



IsiSv&i 



A business man's wife conld not 
sew or read without sharp pains in 
her eyes. For years her eyes were 
Finally she tried sim- 
ple witchhazel, camphor, hydrastis, 
etc., as mixed In Levopik eye wash. 
The result produced by a single bot- 
tle amazed everyone. We guarantee 
a small bottle Lavoptik to help ANY 
CASE weak, strained or Inflamed 
eyes. Aluminum eye cup FREE. F. 
3. Stebbina, druggist. T-4 



>N^ 



THE KEY T« HEALTH 



"WTien the. Chiropractor by scientific adjustment removes 
the pressure from the nerves and helps Nature to .restore 
Health, the operation seems a simple one: Vet the knowl- 
edge is one that is gained only after a great deal of investi- 
gation, for Chiropractic is just as much a si-ience and a pro- 
fession that has to he learned as any orher Health-method. ■ 

Knowledge of Spine and 
Nerves 

The Chiropractor must inti-matcly know ihe body. He 
must know wjiat .nerves feed every organ and just wheiv 
these nerves branch out from the spine, so that lie ran place 
his linger right on ihe point of pressure thai is causing 
trouble in a certain part of the body. 

Because of this expert knowledge of why lie adjusts, win-re 
ami how to do it. thte Chiropractor can, by exaininiiiu :in' 
spine, tell what is the trouble wit hour a patieiu telling him 
anything. The spine s tho. key. Spinal pressure i>n a cer- 
tain nerve leads to weakness and disease in a certain organ. 
That's why the. Chiropractor adjusts a certain part of the spine 
to relieve headaches and another part of the spine for 
stomach or abdominal troubles, etc. In 

m THE BETTER WAY TO MEAlTrlTii 

no drugs or knife are used. If you are not as well as you 
should be, have your spine adjusted and the cause of your 
troubles removed; so Nature can make you strong and healthy 
again. Information, or a spinal analysis given without obli- 
gation. Investigate. 

T.M.Kolberg,D.C. 

Palmer Graduate 

Over First National Bank 

Phone 107 Thief River Falls 



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- 'TS^^p^'-A-.itS^ 



WOOL PRICES JUMP 



Wool prices in the Northwest have 
Jumped 25 cents a pound with the an- 
nouncement of the Federal Reserve 
banks that credit will be extended to 
wool growers who heve been unable to 
dispose of their crop owing to the de- 
moralization of the {wool, market, ac- 
cording to John H; Rich, chairman of 
the . Minneapolis Federal Reserve 
bank. ■■ I ■ 

Three representatives cf Boston 
wool firms have already gone to Mon. 
tana to purchase 'wool of the 1920 
clip. Jlr. Rich !wus advised by 
Thomas A. Marlow of Helena, chair- 
man of tlie branch bank of the Min- 
neapolis Federal Reserve bank at 
Helena. ill' 

Wool had' declined 15 to 25 cents 
a pound in the Northwest as a result 
of the accumulation! of a surplus of 
wool in this countryj and England. 
Last year growers, in the Northwest 
received from 45 to 55 cents a pound 
for wool. ; I 




STEINER 



J) 



Mrs. Frank Slack and son, Ernest, 
drove to Holt Saturday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. R. Rogers and 
family spent Sunday at the R L. 
Muzzy home.- ; j , 

Louis Meyer and Miss Amy Whit- 
man attended the Warren fair, July 
3rd. 1 ! 

Edgar Ufer visited at the Whit- 
man home Sunday: ! 

William Meyer, jvj-lio has been in 
Teniiio, Washingto]i, for several 
months, returned home Friday. 

-M,r. and Mrs. Church and family of 
Angus visited at ; the S. / Warring 
homo Sunday. j 

O. L. Leisner wen 
tlie middle' of the w 
business matters. ;■ 

Hobsou Rogers aiid William Meyer 
attended' the dance; i i' Holt Saturday 
evenin 



to Minneapolis 
:ck/tq attend to 



♦«• 



Cooked and Unbooked Food. 

Sortie one with ail analytical turn of 

mind long ago differentiated man from 

other animals as "the cooking animal," 

and if we may believe, the Greek log- 

. eiid, it was Prometheus who stole fire 
from heaven With" which man might 
Cook. Yet so far as ni'an's diet is con> 

/cerned, if we/may believe many writ- 
■• ers on dietetics, Prometheus made a 
mistake and shortened the lives of 
men by making the kitchen range pos- 
sible, They hold to the theory that 

' mnn should, like thoj other animals, 

' eat his /food raw and uncooked, and 
then the span 'of litis years would 



csr 



• lengthen far' beyond 



*--o"y-» ku nu.iuuu me uireescurt 
and ten assigned to liim by the psalm 
1st, and centenarians would be as plen- 
tiful almost as blackberries in sum- 
mer time.. 



Hemstitching 
MRS. McKINNEY 

Scandia Block 

•Phone;252 

Hours 10 to!] 2; 1 to 5 



the threescore 



■L 






•t\:i?3'Y \ 



J, 



".■••V'c--- 



THE TRIBUNE 



\fcere are cold towns, faendly towns and DEPEM)ABLE 
TOWNS. 

The greatest of these— according to authoritative surveys- 
is the town that can be depended upon. ^ 

This town of OURS is a dependable town. '''"- 

— T use to deal in you; town"— a.counhy shopper remarked 
to a business man (he other day. '1 can get anvthing on earth I 
want here— as cheap or cheaper than anywhere eW 

TJaJ unsohoted testimony shows that the town can be "DE- 

«OTffiupon— matsboppersare learning the value of the real 

TKifr *** meKnants *"» husiness men are daily striving to es- 
tablish. 

^^A^jstling day, a rnan's too busy to stand for very much , 
UJSTMQTION. Slow mails, unreliable transportation fadEnes ' 
—substitution of arta'cks for the one ordered— delays — irritations 
-DISAPPOuVTMENTS, are some of the usual roan order l»*. 
ing trials today— aside from the DEi/)YALTY ot faffing to support 
your town and community TRADE. 

IfyoucanbuyftANYVi^r^vouGmbuyitrighthere. 
Thete is EVERYTHING bere-and the btchstrmg is 01>T 
on every bi'siress and public door in ihistosu 



Legal Publications 




MJW ER DOES HOT 
Sr WHEAT MONEY 




HIGHEST CASH PRICES 

Paid for all Kinds 

of: 

LIVE POULTRY 

'"'! 

DeCremer's 
Market 



Meat 



W. J.j Louck, consulting econo- 
mist for the railroad brother- 
hoods, charges the "middleman" 
with profiteering to the extent of 
18 million dollars. "Jobbers' war- 
time practice being actual crim- 
inal," he charges. He says millers . 
of flour made profits 375 per cent 
greater in 1917 than four years 
previous! ' 



Sea-Horses With Prehensile Tails. 
Queerest of queer fishes is the sea- 
horse, Hippocampus, often seen in 
aquaria, vfoich hangs itself from or 
supports Itself on seaweeds by means 
of a prehehslle tail, which moves dor- 
soventraliyi not laterally, as in other 
fishes. It has a rapidly vibrating un- 
paired fin jon Its back, and the pecu- 
liarlty ot. rolling Its large eyes inde- 
pendently ^pf one another. Now, it Is 
curious that the far-removed chamele- 
on, which is a quaint arboreal lizard, 
should shofr the same sort of prehen- 
sile tail ai the sea-horse, only more 
so, and the same independent rolling 
of the eyes— New York World. 



^pntPickOijt aPrmfer 
Blindfolded "" * 




./GettlieOiieWtoCuiY 
ifUpjrog [Sen Tfour Goo4 

j ability to help. 

• you sell your goods and 
i we can do ! this- at a 
1 reasonable cost to you. 

Economy and standV 
„•!_ ardization 'are the 
. watchwords here. We 
.£■ use Hammermill Bond, 
^ the standard, economi- 
cal, business paper and 
we turn out a grade of 
J. printing that' brings re- 
sults for our customers. 

LET US SHOW YOU 



Pretty Italian Fashion. 
In the old palaces in Italian cities, 
small cuphjoards -flush with the wall 
are a familiar feature, and these are 
made mnrcj attractive sometimes by 
the addition of paintings placed on the 
Inner side W the doors. Thus, when 
these are opened, not only is the In- 
side of the cupboard and its contents 
displayed tj> view! but little pnintings 
may appeat, providing an unexpected 
and welcome piece of decoration. A 
lily or some such flower, standing In a 
simple vase of n good design, looks 
charming. Modern decorators inny, 
perhaps, sei their way to making use 
of tliis pretty fashion. 



(GET PUBLICITY ON CALENDAR 

! That Form of Advertising Is the Most 
j Popular With the Merchants 
of China. 

It has been known for a long time 
what a relative task It was to go. visit- 
ing In China— that is, if you happened 
; to be a lofty dignitary and must there- 
| fore carry along a card of uncomfort- 
able dimensions. Advertising, it seems, 
shows a corresponding divergence not 
only from occidental methods, but 
from those of nearby Japan. There 
are thousands upon thousands of 
newspapers In China, but they are 
not very firmly established, and when 
they do not soon disappear altogether, 
they' are almost sure to change name 
frequently, as has been known to hap- 
pen with certain American products. 
Newspapers of the republic have an 
average dally circulation of 3,000, 
which is larger than it looks, since 
the pnpers arc carefully passed from 
hand to hand. There is, then, to be 
sure, newspaper advertising as well as 
posters. But the most popular form 
of publicity for merchants is— the cal- 
endar! Nowhere is that humble do- 
mestic article more Important than In 
China. Advertisements here placed are 
looked upon j every day. And after nil, 
when you look at the calendars that 
begin to arrive about this time of ths 
year, isn't It possible to Imagine that 
China Is not so far from the West a» 
It might be?— Christian Science MonI 
tor. 



NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORE- 
CLOSURE SALE 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, 
That a certain mortgage made by 
Joseph P. Kokesh and Mae R. Ko- 
kesh, his wife, as mortgagors, to 
James H. Eustice. as mortgagee to 
secure the payment of the sum of 
Seven Hundred Seventy Five Dollars 
(S775.00) dated January loth, 1919, 
tiled for record in the office of the 
Reg'ster of Deeds of Pennington 
County, Minnesota, on the 1st dav of 
August. 1919, at 1:00 o'clock P.'ll., 
and duly recorded in the 'office of said 
Register of Deeds in Book 13' of 
Mortgages on page 495, will be fore- 
closed by a sale of the preni:ses in 
said mortgage and iii this notice de- 
scribed, at the Sheriff's- office in the 
Court House in the City of Thief 
River Falls, in the County of Pen- 
n'ngton and State of Minnesota, at 
10:00 o'clock in the forenoon of the' 
30th day of July, 1920, to satisfy 
the amount then due on said mort- 
gage together with Fifty -. Dollars 
($50.00) as attorney's fees and the 
costs of this foreclosure, *as stipulat- 
ed in said mortgage. 

' That the lands descr'bed in said 
mortgage and which will be sold are 
Lot One (1), Two (2) and Three (3) 
:n Block Twenty-Two (22i of the 
Original Townsite of Thief River 
Fulls, according to the plat thereof 
on tile and of record in the office of 
the Register of Deeds in and for the 
County of Pennington and State of 
Minnesota; 

That pursuant to a provision in 
said mortgage to that effect, the said 
mortgagee has elected to declare and 
does hereby declare the balance of 
the whole sum secured by said mort- 
gage fmmediately due and payable 
011 account of default having occurred 
in the payment of interest due on 
January 13th. 1920. 

That there now is due the sum of- 
Seven Hundred Thirty and 71-100 
Dollars (?7.'I0.71) on said mortgage. 
James H. Eustice 
Mortgagee 
Dated June 2nd, 1920. 
J. J. Truax, 

Attorney for the Mortgagee 
S4M-45 Plymouth Building. 
Minneapolis. Minnesota. 
J S-15-22-2!) Julv 0-13 



+ ' " "" I I I I MH 



Page 7 



The Sun May Be Shining Bright 




to-day and to-mirrow- the 
worst storm in years may 
break. It's the same with 
the lire situation. You never 
can tell when the devouring 
element may devour your 
property and cause vou irre- 
parable loss. There is onlv 
one sure protection — a policy 
of tire insurance in such 
strong companies as we rep- 
resent. If you are not pro- 
tected, sec us without delay. 
Don't let another night pass 
unless you are covered. 



Lawrence Mtg. Co. 



«5 Main Ave. N. 



Phone 443 ■■ 
"""■ ' ' H »♦+♦ + ♦ ' » 



NEWSPAPERS 

We will pay for a short time 

40c per Hundred 

for your old Newspapers, folded and bundled, also 

70c per Hundred 

for sour old magazines.- We will call for anything you are 
unable to bring to the office 



Thief River Hide & Fur Company 



Concerning Mummies. 
Mummifying Is a process of dehydra- 
tion, signifying merely the withdrawal 
of all molsthre from the body. In the 
Peabody mdseum at Cambridge, Mass., 
is a baby that may be thousands of 
years old. jit was found In a cliff- 
dweller's cive, fastened to a board 
cradle, and. to perfectly preserved that 
even the eyes are Intact Interesting 
experiments' have recently been made 
In the "restoration" of mummies ob- 
tained from* caves In the Southwest 
So shrunken are they by desiccation 
that Hie body of . a '30-pound man Is re- 
duced to about fourteen pounds, the 
parchment-like skin holding the bones 



TO OPERATE AIRSHIP FLEET 

Ambitious Plans Credited to English 

Company Wei) Within the Realm 

of Possibility. 

A company has been formed In Eng- 
land for the purpose of operating a 
fleet of airships to various parts of the 
world. The syndicate desires to ac- 
quire ground near Southport, where it 
proposes to erect a tower 120 to 15C 
feet high to which airships may be 
mooted, and an elevator will take the 
pass**gsrs up the tower and into the 
gondolas of the ships. The syndicate 
Intends to have a fleet of non-rigid 
nirships In commission next 'spring; 
the smaller will carry 32 passengers 
and crew and the larger 40 passenger*, 
and crew. The company also antic- 
ipates running some of the larger 
rigid airships now In course of con- 
struction. These will have a carrying 
capacity of 150 passengers and be able 
to travel to any part of the globe. It 
Is proposed to use the smaller non- 
rigid airships to feed the larger ones 
and meet them at the principal cen- 
ters. The cost per mile is put at about 
half the cost of a taxlcab fare today,' 
approximately about 18 cents per mile. 
— Scientific American. 



Notice of Hearing Upon Petition of 
Freeholder 

Whereas, A petition signed by 
Andrew Carlson, a freeholder of 
School District No. 55, in this Coun- 
ty, representing that he is the owner 
of the following described lands, sit- 
uated in said District towit: North-' 
west Quarter Section 15 Twp. 154, 
Range, 42 
.And that said petition has been 
presented to. the County Board of 
Pennington County; and asking that 
his said lands may be set off from 
said District No. 55 to said District 
No. 42 and the said Board has ap- 
pointed a time and place for hear- 
ing thereon. Therefore 
NOTICE 
Is hereby given that said petition 
will' be heard by said Board, at a 
session thereof, commencing on the 
13th day of Jury A. D. 1920, at 2 
o'clock in the afternoon, at the oflice 
of the County Auditor in the City of 
Thief River Falls, in said County, at 
which time and place the said Board 
will hear the evidence and the argu- 
ments of all' persons interested- for 
or against granting the prayer of the 
petitioner. 

Dated at Thief River Falls May 
2Cth, 1920. 

By order of the County Board. 
T. P. Anderson, 
County Auditor and 
Ex-Officio Clerk of Board. 
Thief River Fails, Minnesota, 




It Is Just as 

DANGEROUS 

to be without adequate Tovnedo insurance as it is 
tire insurance. 'In the majority of cases fire losses 
are not total but when a tornado strikes, it means 
a total loss to everything in its path. 

• . W ? h£ ^ e , on display in our bank actual kodak 
pictures of the Fergus Falls tornado of last vear 
which shows clearly the enormous destruction of 
property m that town. 

Rates Extrcmtly Nominal as fallows: 
Dwelling houses and contents S4 per $1,000 for 3 years 
Mercantile buildings and coojents $5 per 51,000 for 3 years 

First National Bank 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 
Resources Over One Million Dollars 




like a bag. 
placed in a 



slowly intra iuced, It gradually, absorbs 
the moisture and resumes somewhat of 
the. contour* of the person ha life, giv- 
ing a notloi of what he looked Uke, 
-But thereafi er It must be kept In al- 
cohol, else c ecay would set In. 



j^iMmkiMii&^i^k 



When such a mummy Is 
closed box, and steam is 



Wnt J BROWN 

Liawyer 

Formei ly County Attorney 

Marshall County 

Office Ov< r First National Bank 

Thief Rjver Falls, Minnesota 



Reasons for Feeding Birds. 
By feeding the birds In cold weather 
one provides ammunition against the 
mosquitoes of June, explains a mem- 
ber of the Animal Protective league. 
It seems that birds feed their young 
on mosquitoes, thus destroying great 
numbers of the pests. Little natural 
food Is available for birds In the win- 
ter except In the extreme South, and 
even there less can be found by them 
at this season than in the summer. So 
when, the table or pantry shelf Is 
cleared: of crumbs If the contents of 
the crumb tray are scattered outdoors 
Instead of being put In the garbage 
can, the birds will be thankful, and 
-will show their gratitude by saving 
(he .foodiglyer many a mosquito bite 
next-- summer. 

,- Mosqaltoes, are only one of the many 
excellent reasons why birds should be 
fed during the winter. The others are 
all the other Insects which hamper 

I the production of the garden, and all 
pleasures of song and plumage.— St 
Joseph Gazette, 



THEO- QUALE 

Lawyer 

Practice In all Courts and B> 

fore tJ. S. Land Oflice . 

McGinn Building 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 



Latest Patterns 
in Silverware 



We have just received a new 
shipment of Silverware in the 
famous Alvin pattern, the 
best and highest grade silver- 
ware on the market. 
Come in and look these pat- 
terns over, They are priced 
right. 



A. A. Wangenstein 

Jeweler 
Across from Evelyn Hotel 



TRIBUNE WANT ADS PAY-Try One 





IX 



Your Electric Fan Will Soon 
Pay for Itself 

THE comfort it gives you is worth a lot, to 
say nothing of the work it enables -you to 
do. We have them in different sizes, for the 
office, the shop, the home. 

Get one and defy hot weather. Keep cool 
and enjoy being active. 

Come in today land make your selection. 

Bottem Hardware Co. 

THE WmCffESTSJi STORE 



^im^A&M^iSmi^i 



m&M k^^M^^^^&^m^^^ 



,..,j; 



.1..,, ...... _ r 



Page Eight 



VOICE OF, THE PEOPLE 



about a month. 

Miss Mabel Hustad left Saturda> 
morning for Warren where she will 
remain for a few days "with rela:, 
tires an 1 friends. 



Sot 
grave one but 



'■Editor. ThejTribuue: 
If ever the! people of Thief Biver 
Falls — merchants, jobbers and citi 
zeus — had just cause to complain ovei 
the manipulation, of the city water 
department th'ey had it last Saturday, 
when \vj{hout warning the entire 
city was deprived of city water for 
half a day. 

only was the fire hazard a 
the health of the city 
was likewise endangered by a lack of 
water for toilets, etc. Housewives 
were handicapped in their housework 
except those few who more fortunate- 
ly than the great majority possessed 
soft water plants or wells which fur- 
nish drinking water. 

"With three issues a week of news- 
papers in the city the city water de- 
partment coii'.d readily have given 
sufficient notice to all water users to 
be' prepared for the period during 
which wafer: was to be shut off for 
necessary alterations in the water 
to be hoped that the 
people will hot again be inconven- 
ienced as they were last week. 
Yours for better service, 

Scott Laird, 
ec'y. Commercial Club 



Miss 



Mrs. 
ed up 
with fr 







\, 



THE TRIBUNE 



^TUESDAY, JULY 6, 1920 



Inez Johnson left Saturday, 
morning for Park Biver, where she 
will spe nd the' Fourth of July. She 
will ret irn Monday evening. . 

I. Thune and son Ole niotor- 
Erom Hazel Friday to visit 
ends and relatives. 
Mr. o!nd Mrs. Carl Nordquist, Miss, 
Inga Tnune and Carl Melby motored 
to Germantowu Sunday where they 
visited tt the Nordquist home 

Miss - Alice Anderson arrived from 
Mclntoih Friday to visit here with 
trends md relatives. 

Robert Farem left for St. Paul 
Friday evening to visit with -friends 
and relatives for an indefinite time. 
Mrs. Albert Johnson and son, Har- 
of Duluth arrived Friday to visit 
friends over Sunday, 

Mrs. H. M. Hicks and sou, Harold, 
motorei to Wood Lake, N. D. Sunday. 
Char es Krause and children motor- 
ed to Bemidji Friday for a visit with 
relatives. They will be gone a couple 
of weeks. 



PERSONALS 

Mrs. IGerfrude Severson, who has 
been visiting at Superior with Mrs. 
R. Flinn, retu-ned home Friday. Carl 
Flinu accompanied her and will visit 
at the Sererdon home for a couple 
of weeks . 

Misses Ida Larson and Thora Ness, 
who have been employed at Faribault 
for the past eight months, returned 
home Thursday evening to remain 



riME TO BE WISE 



Des Moines Register: The folly of 
the proposal to declare peace with 
Germany independent of the treaty of 
Paris was apparent the moment any- 
body afked himself what the United 
States svpuld do after the declaration 
had been made. We should at once 
be confronted with the need of enter- 
ing into some sort of working rela- 
tions with Europe for the future. 
Were we ready to set ourselves up as 
against; the combined judgment of all 



WARNING 



swimming 



that 



! Those swimming in the 
the bridge, are hereby 
swim under the bridge or on 
It is especially requested 
stay on the. north side of t 
order to avoid accidents to 
bride who race back and 
give this warning immediate 



[hborhood of 
warned not to 
the south side, 
all bathers 
le bridge, in 
ihose on the 
forth. Please 
attention. 



E.O.ERICKSON 

Chief of Police 



The Lyqetim- 

[Today and Wednesday 

. • Will Rogers in 
>JUBILO" 



I The rural romance of 
who made good. A little 
smiles; a picture you'll want 



a "no good guy" 
pathos; a wealth of 
to see. 



Monkey Comedy 
Mr. Joe Martin in 

t A Jungle Gentleman" 

\ Matinee, Wednesday at 2:30 



Thursday and Friday 

DOROTHY piSH in 

'jMary Ellen Comes to 
'Town" 



other nations? 

Precisely the same situation now 
presents itself with reference to the 
league -of .'nations. ' The republican 
platform- declares' 1 for "an interna- 
tional' association." But suppose we 
win on that declaration and the ques- 
tion comes'tb ns-what sort of inter- 
national association We mean. Are we 
ready then to set ourselves up as 
against the combined judgment of the 
forty nations who have already, or- 
ganized the league? 

We can get this point more clearly 
if we allow the argument to come 
from a disinterested source, disinter- 
ested at east insofar as our domestic 
politics is concerned in this cam- 
paign. Here are a few paragraphs 
ffom a recent editorial by J. W. Da- 
Foe of the Winnipeg Free Press that 
are well worth the serious consider- 
ation of every American : 

March, 1921, will soon be here. 
It may, probably will see a republi- 
can president in the white house with 
congress behind hjm republican 
in both branches. The field will, 
therefore^ be clear to go ahead, The 
fltfftcu'.ties ot the republicans will 
begin at once. They will first have 
tu decide what they, will do with the 
war with Germany, which will still 
be 'on' officially. It may be very 
greatly doubted whether the repub- 
licans, in power and able to give ef- 
fect to their plans, wIH care to set 
the precedent of declaring peace by 
simple congressional resolution. By 
thus fixing peace the United States 
will forego safeguards and advant- 
ages secured by the treaty of Ver- 
sai.Ies. The constitutional power of 
congress to decare peace might also 
be challenged in the courts. The^ al- 
ternative would be to negotiate' a 
new treaty of peace with German} - . 
The making of this treaty woud not 
be without its difficulties and per- 
plexities; and after it was duly com- 
pleted and signed Senator Lodge, as 
cliajrman Qf the foreign relations 
committee, would have to pilot the 
treaty thru the senate. He might 
conceivably have some trouble in get- 
ting it thru, for the democratic min- 
ority will certainly be numerous 
enough to block, if they chose, the 
ratification of the treaty under the 
two-thirds vote provision. They would 
naturally lie in the mood to , make 
trouble for a republican president. 
■ Senator Lodge and the republican 
leaders generally. So much for the 
peace treaty proper. 

"The United States looking about 
for an 'international association' for 
peace preservation purposes would 
find that there \was already in exis- 
tence an association which, in the 
opinion of practically all the other 
nations of the world, sufficiently met 
the purposes which the United States 
desires to further. Already forty na- 
tions are included in 'the league of 
nations. The list includes all the 
countries who took part in the ,late 
war on the allied side save the Uni- 
ted ' States and practically all the 
neutral nations of Europe and Amer- 
ica. Additions to the. membership will 
be made during the coining year. 
Applications from Esthonia and the 
Ukraine are pending; and the admis- 
sion of some of the enemy states 
within the next twelve months is cer- 
tain. The admission of Germany at 
an early date is a possibilty. 

"Under these conditions, which 
will prevail next year, what will the 
United States do? It will have to re- 
cognize the fact that the league of 
nations is in existence, that it is. func- 
tioning, that it Has accepted and, is 
discharging responsibilities under tne 
peace treaty which it dare not aban- 
don; that it has the backing of an 
overwhelming majority of the na- 
tions of the wor'.d. A meeting of the 
assembly of the league is a certainty 
for 1921. The United States will 
surely not expect the league to meet 
and solemnly vote, itself out of exis- 
tence in. order that an 'international 
association' more agreeable to Sena- 
tor Lodge and his colleagues shall 
take its place. If the league were to 
disappear it wou'.d be a long way 
before it or anything like it would 
reappear. The one hope for the future 
is that the league, defective though 
it may be, will continue and will de- 
velop until it becomes the power in 
the world that its founders expected 
it to be. 

"The United States will, in fact, 
have to go with the other, nations in 
the existing league, or remain out- 
side it in an isolation about which 
•there will be nothing splendid. The 
Anierican people will not be content 
16ng to remain in a position of aloof- 
ness from a movement which makes 
so strong a moral appeal to the con- 
sciences of the world. The league 
needs the United States and can. nev. 
er do the work which awaits It with- 
out its support and co-operation; and 
the United States -will feel increas- 
ingly the obligation to associate Itself 
with the other nations of the world 
in the great causes to which the 
league is dedicated." 



She's with us again! 

* '' ■ ... i 
on the screene, in her 

A Paramount- 

picture that you read abou ;. 



The "funniest girl 

newjest, peppiest picture 

Artcraft picture. The 



— ii 






on June 22 four red bull calves. 
Owner can have same by paying | 
.'for the' expense of keeping and 
advertising. Sam Hauseby, Hose- 
. Wood, Minn., 2% miles SW of 

Rosewood on the Oen farm. 
FbE SALE— 13 HEAD CHESTER' 
White pigs, six weeks old. Priced 
at $4 each. Ed Timm, Thief Riv- 
er Falls. . "- ' 33-1-pd 
FOR SALE. — MODERS',8 ROOM 
house. 716 LaBree ave. N 3>Tpd 
HAVING TAKEN OVER ■ HALSETH 
and Son's Painting 'Business, we 
are in a position to 'do first class 
painting and paper-hanging. All 
work guaranteed. Give us a trial. 
Bakken & Sherstad. Phone 5942 
or 218. 32-2tp 
FOR KENT — A MODERN 7 ROOM 
house. 410 Duluth Ave. N-. C. W. 
Voraehek. 
WANTED— A COMPETENT RELI- 
able stenographer. Apply in writ- 
ing at once to Tessum Seed, Grain 
& Supply Co. . , 34-1 
WANTED TO BUY — GOOD SEC- 
ond hand baby carriage. Must be 
in good condition. Phone 3301. 34-1 
FOUND— BICYCLE — OWNER MAT 
have same by calling Chief of Po- 
-Tiee. . I 34-1 
FOUND— PURSE. HAS NAME OF 
Roy Peterson inside. Call at Tri- 
bune. 34-1 
FOR SAL E — SMITH FORM A 
truck — one ton, $100 will take it. 
Also Ford spark plugs. Regular 
price 31.00. This month 59c. Best 
place to buy auto tires and sup- 
plies. Hicks'. 



If You 



are 



SICK 



Come 
to Us 



We can Kelp you if relief can be given. Thousands of 

termed incurable, cases of all forms of sickness have receiv- 

' ed permanent benefits from our scientific Chiropractic 

Adjustments 




AFFECTIONS OF any of the 
foUowim: parts may be caused 
by nerves.lrT'D'Ogedattheapina 
b7 a aubluxaied vertebra: 



DR. SPOFFORD 
.Optometrist 
Will be at Hotel Evelyn, Thief 
River Falls, Tuesday, July 1 3th, 
Afternoon only. 



►FJP.AIN 

■i-EYES 

*&SS^* THROAT 
^^vV - * HEART 



Book Sale... 



We bare just received a special 
shipment of ene hundred pop- 
ular copyright novels by lead- 
ing authors, such as London, 
McCutcheon. Drummund, 
Mack, Kipling, Wells fi Fair- 
banks. Larnder, etc. 



99c 



Is the price we have put on 
these books to move them in a 
harry. They are regularly 
priced from. $1.25 to $1 75 
net. Just the thing for the hot 
days of July and August. Come 
while the assortment is good. 



LAIRD'S 




V* SMALL BOWEL 
< LARGE BOWEL 
GENITAL ORGANS 
THIGHS & LEGS 



One Course 

of Chiro- ' 

practic 

Adjustments 

Will Make 

You Feel 

Like A New 

Person 

They Will 

Rejuvenate 

Your Entire 

System >• 



SPINE OF MAN 



24 Office Adjustments $25.00 

Why don't you take adjustments and 
let nature cure you? 

Why not CHIROPRACTIC, the 

better way to health? Investigation 

costs nothing. 

CHIROPRACTIC Eventually---- 
Why Not NOW? 

Dr. L. V. JOHNSON 

CHIROPRACTOR 
Palmer School Graduate 



1 to 12 and 2 to 5 and by appointments 
Outside Calls by Appointments 




TRIBUNE WANT ADS PAY-Try One 



-,. 



The combination of light weight 

and great strength— the ideal of 

Maxwell construction— is 

achieved through the 

quality of its steels. 



Prichard Auto Co. 



, Ambition Spoiled 

"Her one aim was to live a spotless 
life." 

"Well, she can't do it now; she's 
had an attack of the measles." — 
Baltimore American. 



WANT ADS 



WANTED — ASSISTANT LAUN- 
dress at Physicians hospitaL 

STRAYED— CAME TO OUR FARM 

FOR SALE — TWO HEAD GOOD 
work mules; one 5 years old and 

"■' one 7 years' old. Good gentle team. 
J. B. Sturre, Kratka route, Thief 

' River Falls. " : 34-1-pd 




■ ""••■ ■ '-^'fe* -^i^w^ ^>fe^us5fe| 'f' f 'fi -V ttHff ; " 




\sjZ ^-C' •* .' J.>i';-V'..:A:£ 



1 EC"*— 



1 ^ '*'' i^"^'^^^ 



VOL.20 No. 35 



LAST WEEKS TO 

DECIDE tylNF 
OFGR* 



$£ 



HARD W R K DURING NEXT 

THREE WEEKS; CAN WIN 

BUICK "SIX" 



Tomorrow l.fgbt'at ten o'clock, lUe 
First r«riml of The Tribune's gi-oar 
?3.(»00 iinfomobile campaign comes 
to a close. 

After that date, .subscriptions wili 
decrease .one half in vote value — just 
exactly one half the amount of votes 
now credited on subscriptions sent 
.in by contestants will be given after 
that time. It .will bt harder to get 
ahead — and harder to get subscrip- 
tions. It wilt be almost impossibi'e 
to attain a sufficient vote reserve to 
make victory certain And it will be 
ai'most impossible for any contest- 
ant to feeL so certain of victory now 
■as to slow up work before the end of 
the race. 

The contestants en er the Second 
Period with no one in the lead— with 
just about an even jreak between 
them. What may b: the decision 
on. July -'fist, when e^ery vote is in, 
•depends* on the work done from, now 
to the close of the race. (Whether you 
s hail coin e. out winner bu July 31st 
: — or a failure — depends on your work 
from now on to the end. ' 

JIake the last three weeks count 
to the utmost. Whehpr 1 you believe, 
how, that your are i l ithe lead, or 
whetbev you fear that you are far in 
the rear — keep going with all your 
might. Don't Vet the fact that the 
first need for hard frork seems to be 
:lnng your best 






^^^^^w^w^^^^^w^^ 



•yjfj.'- / > ! * J *'s*v 



THE" : f Ri»UNE 



THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY, JULY 9, 1920 



"\ WANT GOOD EXHIBITS 

The. womans club of Thief 
Riy ir Falls displayed a thrift 
exh bit at Warren during the 
dist -let federation in May' 
and it was, so favorably coin, 
mi-r ted on that the club was 
nskid to send it to bead- 
quarters in Minneapolis. 
• ijho exhibit has gone on 
record 'as oile of tlie most 
interesting evidences o f 
thrift which any one who 
sa\yj'it will .testify. 

le Woman's Club is ani- 

to have a larger and 

tbr exhibit at the Pen- 

! fun County fair and it 

ask: for the hearty co-oper- 

of the club members 

IV the women in the 

county. 

ir particulars inquire ot 
Irs. E. Mogensen, Secy. 



ions 
boti 
nil! 



and 



BIG 



BAND TO 
PLAY IN CITY 
)N JULY 21ST 



WILL qiVE "CONCERT AT SQUAW 

POINT AND FINISH DAY 

rVITH BIG DANCE 



iolis 



tioiis possible 

ten o'clock 

th. The offices 



over, keep you from d 
work during the Second Period. Don't 
'slow up or lag behind — don-'ti let 
your tide of orders > jg. Just keep 
right on going, all tile time — just" 
keep on tryingj with ail your might 
— just keep on lighting desperately 
anil determinedly — : and keep it up 
until, -you win!! 

Get all the. subscrii 
into this office before 
Saturday night, July It 
of the 'manager, automobile cam 
paign department, whi :*h are located 
in The Tribune building, will be open 
to that hour, and subscriptions "may 
be brought in at any time before ten 
o'clock. Subscriptions jinny be mail- 
ed, also by those contestants] who do I man had 
' not iind it possible to. come into the served 
\ city in person, if the postmark on the j. fifteen m 
\ letter containing the order i& in before 
ten o'clock Saturday night, July 10. 
In case you fear that your subserip- 
. tion wiil not be mailed 'in time take 
especial pains 'to have tire postmaster 
place the official stamp' on the en- 
velope, before ten o'clock. OnVy by 
- following these . conditions can your 
-order be credited with First Period 
votes — and you can't afford to miss 
the added incentive which, big votes 
will give you. • 

And, after maii'ing :your last big 
order — go right on working! Don't 
slow up for a moment — -don't lag 
.behind or give up in disgust. Simply 
keep working with all your might, 
' with just one goal — the first car. Sim. 
_ply keep trying, all' the time, to win 
the Buick "Six.". And, if you work 
hard and constantly, efficiently and 
successfully — you'll \Vin!! 

Let the Vast three 'weeks win the 
Buick "six" for you!.! , 
"Make it a hot one'!!'' 



Harou Bachnian, director of the 
Million Dollar Band which is to play 
in Thief River Palis' on the 21st of 
July, auiounces as a special feature 
Robert iSruee, the 'world's greatest 
Indian c irnetist. wno is now paying 
under M ■. Bachinan's baton for the 
fourth consecutive season. 

Kduca ed at the leading Indian 
.'idiooVs ojf flie United States, namely 
Haskell ind Carlisle, -Mr. Bruce be- 
gan his musical studies . at a very 
early age. After' his graduation -from' 
Carlisle lie played with Arthur Pry- 
or's famo\is band at Atlantic City and 
then p!n'j ed with the famous Bethle- 
hem Steep Works .band at Bethlehem, 
•e he. created quite a furore 




GET NICE INCREASE 



W. C. T. U. To Meet 

The W. C. T. U. will, : meet next 
Tuesday Afternoon at the homo J>f 
Mity. \Sjenberg eas( |of .8th street 
bridge, invited by Mrs. Christenson. 
As this is the annual 1 meeting and 
■election of officers every member is 
requested to be present. 



Kn6w These Men? 
Postmaster John Morgan has two 
letters addressed to Agmund B. N. 
Eknes and Celia Omdalhl, both former 
.service men. In 'case' their address 
■is Known, it should be given to the 
locai' postmaster so the mail may be 
iforwarded. 



Pa., who 

over the bntire east with his wonder- 
fin' come : solos played in full Indian 
costume, war pnint and all. 

From his engagement, Sir Bruce 

cnine to the baud which Mr. Bach- 

organized for overseas and 

the army nearly two years, 

iionths of this ' time being 

spent over-seas.- 



AGED COUPLE 
ARE INJURED 
IN RUNAWAY 



AIR. AND MRS. MAT BRUDE NAR- 
ROWLY ESCAPE DEATH 
WEDNESDAY EVENING 



Durihi 



ed upon, 
soi'oists. 



the past year with' The 



Million Doi'lar Baud, Robert Bruce 
has mad( a tremendous hit all over 
the count y and ho is at present look- 



as one of America's finest 
In fact he does several 




ROBERT BRUCE, CORNETIST 



Visiting" Adklns 

Mr. and Mrs. Warrick, daughter 
and son, of BelUngham, Washington, 
are visiting at the home "of Dr. and 
Mrs. Adkins this week. 



Presbyterian Church 

Rev. R. L. Barackman, Pastor 
On Sunday, July eleventh, the reg- 
ular meeting wili continue,. In the 
morning Sunday school at |en o'clock 
and public worship at eleven o'clock. 
In the evening, at eight o'clock, the 
•evening hour of worship. 



. Ladies Aid to Meet 

The. Xadtes aid of the. Methodist 
T3piscop.nl, church will meet with Mrs. 
Noper, one half mii'e .west of town, 
next Wednesday, July 14, at. 2:30 
p. m.>,, There will be conveyances 
provided, at the church to talte mem- 
bers to the Noper residence. Enter- 
tainment will , be provided by Mrs. 
Noper," Sirs. Smith and Mrs.- Pope. 
-All'.niembers' are urged to' attend. 



stunts on] the coronet that no other 
cornetist has been known to perform 
His tone is soft and velvety and his 
technique nothing short of marvel- 
ous, I ' - 

At school Mr.-, Bruce was promin- 
ent in aOiIetics as well' as musical 
circles, pe was a member of the 
Carlisle football team at the same 
time thatfjim Thorpe, the world's 
greatest, all around athiete played. 
He and Mh Thorpe are warm friends. 

Mr. Brjice appears on every pro- 
gram givfen by The Million Dollar 
Band ' 

The concert will be played at 
Squaw- Pifint providing' the weather 
permits, otherwise the program win 
be carried out in the Auditorium. 
The admission to this concert is 50c 
for adults) and. 25 cents for children. 



Bib 



ible Chautauqua 

The Scandinavians of Thief Biver 
Falls consider themselves very fortUr 
nate in. having a Bible Chautauqua 
held in flieir own' language. The 
meetings ire attended with great in- 
terest, 411 Scandinavians are in- 
vited to t: le Chautauqua tent to hear 
the following subjects: Friday eve- 
ning, "Wll Christ come again the 
second tir ie? Sow and Why?" Sun- 
day eveniig, "Are we living in- the 
time of th s end? May we, know when 
it began?' Come at 7:45 o'clock.' 



Mr. and Mrs. Mat Brude lnid i 
very narrow escape from death Wed 
uesday evenkg about six o'clock 
when the horse they were driving be- 
came frightened, running away and 

throwing the couple' head first from' 
the buggy 

The cause of the accident as near 
as it can be figured out, is due to the 
breeching becoming loose, causing the 
shafts to fly up and frightening the 
horse. They were coming up First 
street arid in making the turn at 
Main the buggy tipped and both were 
thrown headfirst into the street. No 
one was near when the accident oc- 
curred and it was first -noticed by 
Judge Giiudeland, who was in the 
court room upstairs. He immediate- 
ly notified Sheriff LaBrec who rush- 
ed into the street to find the coupi'e 
lying unconscious in the street aud 
bleeding freely from their wounds. 
They were picked up and Mrs. Brude 
seemed to be the worst injured of the 
two, she was taken to the hospial 
while Mr. Brude was rushed to. the 
office of a physician where his wounds 



GIVEN A BIG 
BOOST AS LIVE 
STOCK CENTER 



PRIZE CATTLE BEING EXHIBIT- 
ED AT ALL FAIRS IN THIS 
TERRITORY 



The Guernsey breeder's of Penning- 
ton county arc doing much to boost 
the Guernsey breed ,n the northwest 
by showing a carload of their finest 
animals on the show circuit in this 
part of the state. This car-load was 
loaded in Thief Ri\er Falls on Tues- 
day, June 29, and shipped to Ada 
where the county rulr was held on 
Jui'y 1, 2 and 3. From, there the 
show stock will be Shipped to Fertile 
and shown on July 5, 6 and 7, at 
Crookstoii on July 8, 9 aud 10, at 
Fargo July 12 to . 17 and at Grand 
Forks July 19 to 24. After making 
this circuit the car wilL return to 
Thief River Falls in time for the Pen- 
nington county fair on August .4, 5 
and (S. 

The . herds are appropriately and 
attractively labeled with sigiiSiof the 
individual owners and one large sign 
advertising Pennington county as the 
Guernsey center of the Northwest, 
coming from a locality with more ac- 
credited herds than any county in the 
United States. , 

The show stock is taken care of 



Local postal employees 
and rural carriers received 
a ' ten per cent' increase in 
•alary starting the first of 
this month, -which means in 
the neighborhood of .$200 
a year more in salary. This 
increase is general and all 
offices in thte United States 
are to receive the increase. 
The size of the. increase is 
based upon the class of the 
office, and as this office is a 
second class, the increase is 
based acco.riingly. 

It is needless to say that 
the increase is welcome to 
all the local employees with 
the high cost of .living show- 
ing very few signs of set- 
tling down and again com- 
ing back to earth. 



Official Paper of 'Pennington County 

Small 

DEPARTMENTS 
ARE WANTED 



AUTO TOUR 
TO BE MADE 
NEXT TUESDAY 



WILL BE MADE IN INTERESTS 

OF BIG PENNINGTON COUNTY 

FAIR 



USE OF AUDITORIUM THIS YE\R 

INSURES BEST OF CARE FOR 

EXHIBITS 



were drsesed and in a short time he ! by Roman Paulson and Eber Coukliii 

fui'ly recovered. j of Thief River Falls. These two boys 

Mrs. Brude. diil not recover as I have done much to fit the stock for 



quickly as her husband, but at this 
writing she is .fast on the roail to 
recovery and wilL be alright again 
iu a few days. 

As both parties are well along -in 
years it was feared for a time that 
their ip juries might, -prove .Serious 
but it- is fortunate that neither of 
them are seriously ' injured and will 
soon be as weli'as ever. ■ 



the show ring and will bring the 
animals through the circuit iu fine 
showing condition. 



NATIONAL DEBT OF 

WORLD POWERS SHOWrJ 

Of the $220,000,000,000 added to 
the world national indebtedness since 
the beginning of the European war, 
approximately $200,000,000,000 or 
more 'than nine tenths, was created 
by the seven great countries partici- 
pating in the war, Great Britain, 
France, Itai'y, the United States, Rus. 
sla, Germany and Austria-Hungary. 

Per capita debts of principal coun- 
tries, 1913, and 1920, as compiled 6y 
the National City Bank or New York, 
compare as follows: • 







1913 


1920 


United States . . 




* 11 


$ 225 


Great Britain . . . 




78 


8S0 


France 




.160 


1,150 


Italy ".'... .". . . 




83. 


. 365 


Germany . .'. . . . 




. 18 


800 


ftussia. ........ 




. 27 


125 


Austria ........ 




63 


525 


Hungary 




70 


387 


Austria 




18 


318 


Canada ...'.'.":. 




70 


159 


♦Exclusive of debts 


of 


German 


states.- "a';l91T. zz 


1918 







A. B. Fossum, 1 of Herreld, S. D., 
came over from Grand - ! Forks to 
spend.. tlie"4th with' his parents, Mr. 
arid Mis. T. A. Fossum. 



Big Men Get Together 

J. C. Briley, Rays Crossing* Indi 
ana, writes: "I notice that some of 
our national leaders have been openly 
criticizing the nomination made at 
Chicago or some of their rival candi- 
dates to the convention, and others 
seem to be skulking in their tents. I 
believe that the rank and file of he 
republican party, now that the nomi- 
nation has been made, would like for 
our leaders to set a better, example, 
quit their quarreling with one another, 
keep their feet on earth and their 
heads levei and help get things back 
to normal In this old U. S. A. again. 
Our eaders should be big enough to 
be friendly in defeat as wed as in 
victory. Now that Harding . and 
Coolidge have been nominated, if we 
expect to save' the country we must 
all get behind them 'and make them 
sure of republican victory. , The Lord 
knows we have had enough trouble' 
in.i.the last eight years ajsd if one 
government is. going to endure we 
must have something more stable 
and sound. So, big men, forget your 
troubles, love one another, do ydiif 
duty and we little fellows will ' do 
the rest." 



hould 
at least bn fifty cars in the parade 
when .the" final count in made and the 
trip is started. A meeting of the 
Auto club last evening wa< called 
and it was decided that the. tour 
should take in all the towns north 
along the Gi-qiit Noilthern "tcuniin- 
atiug at Warrond. The towns to be 
visited on the trip north will inc'ude 
Holt, Middle River, Strathc:na. Bad. 
ger. Roseau, and Warrond. On the. 
return trip the Soo line will be fol- 
lowed back' thus making a complete 
cin-ic of the trade territory adjacent 
to Thief River Falls. It is believed 
this trip wil: do much to help boost 
the fair along and will also help in 
a business way for the entire city. 
The band is to be carried along aiid 
a grand and glorious time is -assured 
all who make the trip. The' return 
trip will be made on Wednesday aud 
those who contemplate making the 
trip' should hand their names in so 
that the exact number may be known 
and arrangements made up the line 
to take care of the crowd. It is fig- 
ured that there should be at least 
one hundred- and fifty or two. hun- 
dred make the trip and it is certain 
that those who do make the. trip 
will feel that they have spent the 
time we:i aud to advantage. Remem- 
ber that the tour leaves this city 
early next Tuesday morning and 
everyone who can go should be on 
hand bright and early. 

President E; M. Stanton of the 
Commercial qlub has named H. W. 
Protzeller, Dr. C. R. Ciandal! and W. 
B. Fuller as a committee from the 
ci'ub to co-operate »vlth the Automo- 
bile club, Merchants association and 
Fair association in making arrange- 
ments ;for the proposed auto tour of 
towns north and south of Thief River 
Falls. . ■ • 



Only a trifle more than two weeks 
from today the big Pennington coun- 
ty fair will-be going in fuil forve and 
judging from the list of attractions 
that have been lined up bv Seereary 
Smith, this certainly is going to be 
one of the big worth whiie fairs. 

Amusements of every kind have 
been secured and it is antii-iputed that 
there, will lie several more added at 
the last minute, which is alwavs tile 
case, and which usually .prove' to lie 
attractions that have engagements 
at other point* but for unknown 
reasons fail to make connections and 
play the nearest fairs open at thai 
time. Mr. Smith states that lie is 
•vmfident that the. lineup he lias in 
the way of attractions this year is 
going to lie instrumental in bringing 
the largest Vrowd io the Pennington 
county, fair that has so fur been seen 
in this city. He is confident lh.it nil 
wili agree with him that lie has se- 
cured the best features possible in 
view of the fact Unit lliis eanimt lie 
considered one' of the .bigger fairs, 
but with his persistent eir.nts in at- 
tempting to secure nothing but high 
grade attractions, lie is eeiiiiin that 
the fair his year will surpass all oilier 
attempts and will easily eelipse other 
years in a great many re>peets. 

Special attention is ealled lo the 

filet that the Allilii.rium is to b- used 

! this year for the housing ,,r n,,, ox - 

; hibis of the sehoos and tin- t'anej- 

xhlbils of the hnlies of 



A real booster trip is to be made 
on the morning of Tuesday. July 27th i 
under the auspices of the auto club, 
the purpose being to help along the \ 
big fair that is coining early iu Aug- ' 
ust and to get acquainted with 'our 
neighbors. The trip will be made bv ; , , . 
auto and it is believed there should I ,, '. , , 

the county. It has been .-on-idered 



an y 
•I'l'i.- 



Ihe 
wilL 
and 
l ha I 
good 



impossible -to use Hie present build. 
ing on the fair grounds hiitsinueh as 
this building is not eoiisidered safe 

forleilvillg [he valuable exhibi!- over 

niglil Anil other ihiinage that might 
conic as [he result- nf rain. Tin- .\-idi> 
torium is lo be u..ed -trieily ['.,;• inese 
two exhibits only and ii is ....riain 
that no harm can befall 
exhibits hi lliis' building, 
he m> danger from rain 
especial rare-will be uikei 
every ailie.e is relumed 
shape as it was the day i; was 
brought in. Iu addition lo iv ex- 
hibits of the schools and the faney 
nf the eily have agreed lo install 
booths for the display of ilieir wares 
and special clVorts le seeure demon- 
strators from the .ru-mrjes for (he 
fair dues are being made and no 
doubt there will be sever.,, interest- 
ing demonstrations on the floor when 
I the huge building is thrown open to 
| the pillnie. Tickets for the fair 
I grounds and the exhibit at the Audi- 
i torium will be sold al Hie price of one 
land those unending the fair iviil also 
be privileged to am-ud the exhibit at 
the Auditorium for tiie pro-,, of Ihc 
j fair alone. Two tirtols will be is- 
j sued, one for the fair and one for Hie 
exhibit al the Auditorium, both for 
the price of one. The ladies ot [he 
I bounty are especially rei|Uc-led to 
j bring in all. the exhibits possible with 
I ihe full assurance that they will lie 
I iimpiy protected and thai ili.-n- will 
| lie mulling to fear iu lie- way of 
luiiingc. It is Imped thai every lady 



in the county wiil have si,m< 
and that this year will -re 
the he.-t and laigesi exhibits 
display iu the hi;Iory of the 



libit 

■ ■ r 



. Swedish Ev. Mission Church. 
O. J. Lundet!,. JBfjstjy. )...•'„.. 

Sunday, July 11. Sunday, schqol,.at 
10 a. in. No morning service. Ser- 
vice at 8 p. m. conducted by.^.Rey. 
W. Drotts :of Viking. Rev. Droits 
will also preach at Black Biver at 
3 p. m. ' :' v ' •'.-• ,-' -, : . 



Drive to Henning . 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Bredeson; ac- 
companied by Miss Louise Erickson, 
left Saturday morning for Henning 
via auto to spend ' two weeks on an 
outing. ; 



' Visit at Bemidji 

Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Sapero spent 
the week end at Bemidji visiting. 
They made the trip in their car and 
report a very enjoyable time in -that 
city. 



UNCLAIMED LETTERS 

The following is a list of the un- 
claimed letters held at the Thief 
River Falls, Minn., post office for the 
week ending July 3, 1920. If not 
called for within two weeks from the 
above date they will be sent to the 
Dead Letter Branch, Chicago, 111. 

Banister, Mr. William 

Bostrom, Revs O. F. 

Bryam, Mr. Sythe 

Clark, Miss May 

Folden, Miss Mary 

Grams, Emit 

Hobart, Mrs, Stella 

Kemp, Mr. Wm. J. 

Larson, Soren 

Mogan, Thomas 

Myre, Mr. Olaf 

Peterson, Miss Belle 
, . Staley, Win. ' ' 

Stich, Mr. Leon % John Steven 

TOmmerdahf, Mr, H. C. 
.. Wfieii calling for the above letters 
please state that they were adver- 
tised.. ; 

' John Morgan, P. M. 



Big Game Sunday 
The local busebad loam will meet 
the huskies from Radium in this city 
next Sunday at the fair grounds and 
iu the opinion or those who know- 
both teams, it -is the general predic- 
tion that this game is going to be 
fast and furious. The local team 
have settled, down iuto the harness 
and promise that the team from Ra- 
dium will know they have beeniome 
place when the game is over77The 
local boys are playing some mignty 
fine games and deserve the support 
of the entire community. It is hoped 
that as many as possible will attend* 
the game Sunday aud lend their sup- 
port to the home team. They are play- 
ing mighty good bail ,aud deserve 
your support. Attend the game Sun- 
day and root for the home team. 

Return From Outing 

Mrs. M. Benson and children re- 
turned Wednesday evening from De- 
troit where they have been enjoying 
an "outing for the past two' weeks.- 
Mr. Benson, who accompanied his 
famiiy to Detroit, returned the first 
of last week. 



Have Enjoyable Trip 
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Pratt returned 
the first of -the week from a motor 
trip which Included the tfowns of 
Ottertail and Detroit. They had a 
very enjoyable trip and enjoyed he 
outing immensely. 




Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Patton, of 
Malcam passed thru Thief River 
Falls Tuesday to Federal Dam where 
they will make their future home 
with their son, P. S. Patton. 



; i 
• ft*--"* 



/"|T 



H Page Two 



This column conducted by Automo- CONSTANTLY 



bile- Campaign Department, The Tri- 
bune. 






V 



A LITTLE ADVICE 

You cannot make- a success- 
ful' fight unless you believe in 
yourself. The key to the gates 
of victory is embodied' in the 
power that is in. you — in the 
belief you have in yourself and 
in the stamina you have to 
back up that belief — Herbert 
Kaufman. > 

The supply of tinie is truly a 
daily miracle, au aft'iar genuine- 
ly astonishing when it is exam- 
ined. Time is yours. It is the 
most precious of possessions. No 
one can take it from you. It is 
uustealable, and no one re- 
ceives either more. or less than 
you. The only limit to the 
things that time can do for you 
is your own utilization of it. — 
Arnold Bennett. 

Don't stop part way!! Don't 
be satisfied with half done 
work ! ! Face about-r-work hard- 
er — cdiiub higher!! Climb high- 
er, and keep climbing until you 
reach the pinnacle. Show that 
you have the wUi-power and 
the strength to reach the top. — 
Drummond. 

Never talk of failure, in any- 
thing. Half the failures of the 
world are due to the fact that 
those making them had not 
learned how much success de- 
pended on BELIEF IX SELF. 

II. K. Newcomb. 

Jic glad to give in time and 
labor fu:i value for that which 
used to pro-lit TODAY will' ac- 
' cumulate power for you TO- 
MORROW. — Archer Brown. 



j 



THE TRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JULY 9^-1020 



Automobile Campaign News, 



"LABOR WINS ALL."— Tacitus 



-AND WIN!! 



Find out y<ur weak points. 



! GOT TO BE A-WORKER— A REAL 
If ! WORKER AND A CONSTANT 



man who makes up his mind to win 
a car — who works always forward 
with that one goaf in mind— who 
turns every possible opportunity to 
his advantage — who disregards every 
( discouraging event and remembers 
j onty the wonderful chance he has to 
j win— WILL WIN THE CAR HE 
j WANTS. Nothing is impossible to 
i him who keeps' trying. One of the 
' cars can be YOURS ! 

GO IN AND GET IT BY WORK- 
ING HARD RIGHT NOW!!! 



your efforts t(j secure subscriptions ; WORKER— IF YOU WANT TO SUC. 
lire resulting monotonously in ilatiCEED!! 

failure-!— if you're not getting over , Advertise, yourself . Don't hesitate 
with your salet-talk as often as you; to publish your work and your needs 
believe you si ouUl— find out where, wherever an advertisement will as- 
vou arefailiuj,. and whether or notj sist you. in any remote way. IF EV 
"vour approach or system of secur- ERYONE WAITED FOR ADVER 
ins interest fids to work out— and TISEMENT FROM OTHERS— AND 
then correct it Find out your point NEVER DID ANY HIMSELF— 



of failure — -am remove it. 



PUNCH-PEP-PERSEVERANCE 



WE'D NOT GET VERY FARM 



HITS FOR SUCCESS / 

Punch, pep and perseverance — Don't be afraid to ask your friends 
THE THREE 1"S— have made tUe | fQi . ]i<? t0 win TeU them wnat you 
«nppf»s<; nf ma iv a groat man. Aim i 
thelack hasleai.t failure where ev- are working for and of the good 



CTVthing seemed to point to success. 
PUNCH — PEP — PERSEVER- 
ANCE — have you utilized them in 
your work? Have you in your daily 
efforts a super-abouuding belief in 
your product n yourself, and a con- 
fident knowledge of the value of that 
which you se.i, that convinces your 
prospect as it has convinced you? 
Have vou cultivated in yourself an 
ability" to KEEP GOING — to come 
back in spite Of rebuffs and to rise up 
in spite of hard defeats— to show- 
stamina wherfe most people show the 
white feather,? Have you achieved 
such a deter nination and belief as 
to be able fi disregard everything 
except that \ hich helps you toward 
vour goal? AND ARE YOU PUT- 
TING INTO YOUR WORK THE 
VERY BEST THAT IS IN YOU OF 
PEP AND PERSEVERANCE— OF 
EFFICIENCY] AND CONSISTENCE? 
If vou ARE utilizing THE THREE 
p>K— YOU'LL WIN. And, if you're 
WHEN 



work you have done so far — show 
them what a large reward you can 
win. for good work — and they'll be 
more than glad to help- you. ' Remem- 
ber — when a close friend gives you 
subscription to help you in your 
work — he's doing you a favor — but 
he is a'.so getting more than his 
money's worth in actual news. Show 
him the value of The Tribune— its 
market reports twice a week, its 
twice a week publication of NEWS 
WHEN IT IS NEWS, its farm clien- 
tele — and . there arc very few who 
won't be more than glad to he'.p- you 
with a long term subscription. 

Also, wherever possible — work for 
long term subscriptions. Subscrip- 
tions for one year, after ten o'clock 
July 10th, entitle you to 5.000 votes 
— subscriptions for three years to 
25,000, and subscriptions for five 
years to 50.000. Thus it may be 
plainly seen that as the subscription 
amount increases, the vote total cred- 



WHERE THERE'S A 
WILL 

(Note: This true story of a 
young man's great success, un- 
aided by riches or influence, in 
a campaign exactly similar to 
that now being conducted by 
The Tribune, and written by 
that young man several years 
ago. will appear in installments 
in this column during the pro- 
gress, of The Tribune's great 
$3,600 campaign. READ IT — 
DON'T MISS IT— IT HAS 
MUCH IN IT FOR YOU.) 
(By Robert Douglas) 



N'T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE 
TALKING ABOUT. I showed them 
The World was a good paper — and 
they admitted it. Then, I argued — 
would a good newspaper, a paper 
with the standing of The World, 
DARE to cheat its readers and 
friends in any such manner? Would 
any respectable -newspaper — a news- 
paper drawing its sole support from 

sa.y;sfiefl readers and .satisfied ad- 
vertisers — BE FOOLISH ENOUGH I 
TO CUT ITS OWN THROAT IN 

SUCH A MANNER? And, last of 

all— I did this solely as a bluff, tho 
[ I would have made good if necessary 

—I GUARANTEED TO THEM THAT 

THE CAMPAIGN WOULD BE 

FOUND ENTIRELY SQUARE BY 

JUDGES AT THE END OF THE 

RACE, And they kirjked in with 

subscriptions — becau.e I told them 

politely that I was going to keep on 

trying until they did ! 

The offer looked too good to be 

true — and it was. But I determined '• Citation for hearing on Petition for 

to go 011 working .ind fighting and , Administration, 
trying right up to the last day — 



word in the meantime. ' 
: "This receipt is for three years,. 
Mr. \Silver. You're getting The 
World at a time when the price' is 
lower than it is likely to be in the 
future — and at the same time are 
helping me tremendously. Tea dol- 
lars is the correct amount — " 

"Say — why — oh, well, I guess it's 

lilt right. Ten dolars. did you say?" 

ami he swung to his desk and started 

to fill out a cheek for that amount. 

' "All right. Bobby — here you are,*" 

and he handed me the check. I turu- 

I cd and started out. after thanking 

Ifiiiu most deeply. "Say — Bobby — 

■ ilid you ever think of being a book 

agent?" 

(To Be Continued Tuesday) 



Legal Publications 



I DETERMINED 
FIRST. 



TO WIN THE 



T0M0RR0W-AND MONDAY 

Saturday night, tomorrow night, at 
ten o'clock, the First Period of the 
greatest automobile campaign ever 
conducted in Northern Minnesota will- 
close.. After that time, subscriptions 
will count just ONE HALF as much 
in votes — it will be just twice as hard 
to get the subscriptions which will 
win the car. After that time, ter- 
ritories will be s...tut; opportunities 
scarce— Tl) WAIT UNTIL AFTER 
TOMORROW NIGHT TO DO YOUR 
BEST WORK IS TO LOSE ABSO 
Ll'TELY. 

NOW is the time to get in your 
best and biggest orders. Now is the 
time to do vour best and hardest 
work. TODAY AND TOMORROW 
may win the Buick "Six" for you. 
Hard work today and harder work 
right up to the lust hour of the race, 
miiv liieuii it glorious victory for you. 
GET EVERY SUBSCRIPTION POS- 
SIBLE INTO THE CAMPAIGN OF- 
FICES BY TEN O'CLOCK SATUR- 
DAY NIGHT. And then — go right 
ahead with your hardest work foi 
subscriptions, all thru Che Second 



not — NOW I& THE TIME WHEN j ; tc(1 j„ crcaseB even more. 

THEY WILL HELP YOU THE j Advertise yourself. Tell your 

MOST. I friends — and convince them — that 

PUNCH — PEP PERSEVER- j y, )U are in to w iu. Let everyone in 

ANCE — THEY CAN WIN FOR YOU ! ' TOUr neighborhood know about your 

campaign and about your belief in 
yourself ORGANIZE EVE RY 
FRIEND AND ACQUAINTANCE 
AND NEIGHBOR TN A SOLID BODY 
BEHIND YOU— GET THEM TO 
WORK FOR YOU AND HELP YOU 



It is not inly in promising your- 
self to succeed, that achievement lies. 
It is also in lie honest effort to make 
good which follows that promise — in 

the determination to prove yourself wurtiv run i.vju aiw n^u.. ^~ u 
worthy of silccess— that achevement IN - EVERY WAY POSSIBLE^-AND 



. c .,. And oily thru determined and 
honest effort}" enn you ever hope, to 
win. THINK IT OVER!! 



YOUR GREATERT NEED 

in- friends, a great 



IT WILL TAKE A MIGHTY GOOD 
WORKER TO BEAT YOU. 

And— most important of nil- — 
DON'T SLOW UP FOR A MOMENT. 
Keep up your work just as you did 
during the. First Period — without 
flagging- or halting for a moment. 
Don't let anyone discourage you — 
don't let any temporary failure or 



Your frieiids, a great many 
them,, promised you their subscrip-, 

tions "when you needed them -" I rebuff sour you against the work 
Perhaps they did this merely to get' 
rid of J 

it. If ...... ,.-- 

is certain Unit they will be more than 

glad to he'.p you, given au oppor-i 

[unity. ■ J 1 Every day brings joy and sorrow 

At. any rdte— go - back to every | fQ ^ porget tne discouraging events, 
one of those who has refused you be- 1 y , no t. having anv worse work 
o — n,.,i inh t-iiom that vou are in ... , _, ^ „«. „„„- 



haps they did this mereiy to get _ Ja<t kecp workiug anu kee p going— 

of you— 1 erhaps they really meant ^^ t ^ ag and ke(?p flghtin g_AND 

If they are friends of yours, it „, IX!! - 

1 >. J*. ^1 ...til l>i< ninru Hi fill »■• , _._ „--..- • 1 i 



I WIN!! 

WORK HARD— AND WIN!! 



Period, 
er work 



going to take hard- 1 working 



fore, and tell them that you are in 
desperate need of subscriptions right 
now— that you'll uever need their 
iiibscriptions worse than you do right 
now Tell hem that YOU'VE GOT 
TO HAVE THEIR HELP AT ONCE 
TO WIN— AND STICK UNTIL YOU 
GET IT. 

There are hundreds of subscrip 

had right now in your 

Respite the fact that 

n , great many actively 

ontestants — still Y'OU 



tions to be 
territory, 
there ARE 



r ^scrlS wm count i k^y^u- territory ^ and the peo- 



•iptions will count Mummy ;*»" > --—■.■ .--- - - 
tess'aml'itwi'-lhehardeAogetthein, pic in it. nave by far THE BEST 



SECOND I 
UTMOST 



having any 
getting ahead than any of your 
rivals. The difficulties that confront 
you come also to halt the progress of 
your opponents. You CAN win if 
you simply keep your heart up. The 



Chapter Ten 

The vote standing appeared Wed- 
nesday, giving the names and vote 
totals of all' the contestants entered 
in the race. 

I found something in it which 
gave me a whole lot of concern — - 
something that really frightened me 
for a whii'e. A girl named Sterling, 
living only a "few miles from my home v 
had leaped from the bottom to a big 
lead over all the workers. I had 
heard rumors from time to time/ that 
.she was putting up a hard fight, but 
had never before thought much 
about it. Right then I decided' to see 
that Miss Sterling didn't get any 
farther ahead — and to make my 
mighty hardest effort to take the lead 
away from her. ■ / 

I worked harder that week than I 
ever had before'. Up early in the 
morning — to bed late a^' night — and 
busy all the time. Somehow, I be- 
gan to wonder if the realty wonder- 
ful offers I had taken at the begin- 
ning of the campaign weren't more 
flukes than anything else — if I hadn't 
simply had the proverbial "begin- 
ner's luck." I was down in the 
mouth and discouraged. It was hard 
— mighty hard — and I had to fight 
all the time. It was a close fight 
and a hot one — every contestant was 
working deperately, and every one 
of them was a dangerous rival. I'll 
give you just a few samples of the 
kind of things I had to go up against: 
One oltl lady — a bit of a crab, 
anyway — to'.d me. when I approached 
her for. a subscription: "You're work- 
ing for a crooked bunch — and I 
wouldn't help you even if I did want 
to take. The World. Y'ou'li never get 
anything out of it — and you ought 
to know it." 

/Another one — "What do I want 
■that paper for, anyway? Y'ou can't 
tell me there isn't a string tied to 
"it v somewhere — that it isn't a fake— 
you know they couldn't afford to. give, 
away all' that stuff for nothing. 
Y'bu'll get stung and stung bad — and 
I' don't want to be tangled up in 
any hard feelings afterward." 

And what I told both of these could 
be compressed into mighty few 
words — THAT THEY SIMPLY DID 



I told Mr. Silver that our price 
was fifteen dollars for three years — 
being very* careful not to mention 
shorter terms. I 

He hesitated: "Er — now — -honest- 
ly. Douglas — I'm not at all sure that: 
.' I care — thatr I care to take your pa- 
per just now." 

I came back quickly: "Mr. Silver 
— how many farms 00 you own?" 

"Why — why — I have about thirty 
listed right now. You understand 
that I own an interest on'i'y in these 
farms. But — what has that to do 
with it? 

"On most of the farms, you have 
tenants working and selling grain 
and stock 011 shares with you — • 
haven't you?" 

"Why, yes — but what — " : 

"How do you know whether they 
are selling the product that -belongs 
partly to you at top prices or not? 
How do you know when you can 
get the best price — and when the 
prices are low for buying?" 

"Why— -\ always call up the Mid- 
land Elevator — down by the depot, 
wheif I want to know anything like 
that — " 

"Yes, and half the time you don't 
get information or satisfaction, be- 
cause the one who handles the mar- 
ker report from the Board of Trade 
isn't always in. Wouldn't you rath- 
er have the market report delivered 
RIGHT TO YOUR DOOR OR HERE 
AT THE OFFICE? Admitting, that 
the manager is a friend of yours — 
don't you think you'd rather not 
impose on him all the time?" 
"Well — I—" 

The World brings you the market 
report three times a week. You get 
an absolutely up to dafe, correct and 
accurate report — you (tin paste it 
our and tile it or give it away or. do 
anything with the report-^and you 
don't have to go to the annoyance of 
phoning for it. And The. World 
brings you more than that. In The 
World is the latest local news — the 
real estate transactions — the national 
news — THE WORLD IS YOUR 
ONLY SAFE BET AS A NEWSPA- 
PER!!" I abstracted my "receipt book 
from my desk, and started to fill it 
put. I filled it 6'ut completely — 
for THREE YEARS — saying not a 



istrath 
Estate of August O. Schneider 
State of Minnesota,- County of Pen- 
nington in Probate Court. 

In the matter of the Estate of 
August O. Schneider, Decedent. 

The State, of Minnesota. To The- 
r- ssa Schneider and all persons in- 
terested in the granting of adminis- 
tration of the estate of said deced- 
ent: The petition of Theressa 
Schneider having been filed in this 
Court, representing that August O. 
Schneider, then a resident of the 
County of Pennington. State of Min- 
nesota, died intestate on the 2ftth 
day of May 1020, and praying that 
letters of administration o£ his 
estate be granted to Nick Bundhund 
and the Court, having fixed the time 
and place for hearing said petition : 
THEREFORE. YOU AND EACH OF 
Y'OU." are hereby cited and required 
to show cause, if any you have, be- 
fore this Court at the Probate Court 
Rooms in the Court House, iu the 
City of Thief River Falls in the 
County of Pennington. State of Min- 
nesota, on the 2-lth. day of July. 
]!)20. at Ten o'clock A. M.. win- 
said petition should not be granted. 

Witness, the Judge of said Court, 
and the seal of said Court. this"2:Hh. 
day of June 1920. 

Ira. (..'. Richardson, 
(Court Seal) Probate Judge. 

J. M. Bishop 

Attm-ney for Petitioner 
j-2-0-10 



TH£0 QUALE 

Lawyer 

Practice in all Courts and B* 

fore U. S. Land Oflice 

AlcGinn Building 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 



HIGHEST CASH PRICES 

Paid for all Kinds 

of 

LIVE POULTRY 

. • at 

DeCremer's Meat 
Market 




YOU GET JNTO 

ONCE. „ t „ 

MAKE IT A WHIRLWIND FIN 

ISH Vv'D .^WHIRLWIND SUCCESS 

MAKE 1-VERY DAY OF THE 

ERIOD COUNT TO THE 

FOR VICTORY— KEEP 



IT UP— AND THERE'S NO ONE 
BEAT YOU. 



WORK. 

! H\RD WORK DURING THE SEC- 
OND PERIOD IS TO DECIDE THE 
iWINNER — RIGHT NOW THE 
ij-llill) IS TOO CLOSE FOR ANY 
lONE Til BE SURE OF VICTORY 

OR AFRAID OF DEFEAT. 

CO \11F\D AND MAKE THE 

Xnd'pEHIODJVIN FOlt VOU!!| W™ CAN^BEAT^OU. ^ 

REQUEST TO CONTESTANTS 

It is important that.' when a sub- 
scription is sent to Tile Tribune, it 
be specified to whom that subscrip- 
tion is to be credited. Several com- 
plaints have come iu from friends 
of contestants who subscribed ito 
The Tribune to serve two purposes — 
to 110:11 their favorite contestant tp 
get a good paper — because the sub- 
scription has not been properly cred- 
ited. Since The Tribune was not in- 
formed at the time of the receipt of 
these snbscriptions, to whom they 
were to be credited, it is manifestly 
impossible now to adjust them. SO — 
IF YOU WANT YOUR SUBSCRIP- 
TION TO BE CREDITED TO YOUR 
FAVORITE' CANDIDATE— KINDLY 
SPECIFY ACCURATELY THE CON- 
TESTANT'S NAME AND ADDRESS/ 
Furthermore, it is urgeutly request- 
ed that eontesants give the best care 
possible to the. work of making Aut. 
their reports LEGIBLY AND /AC- 
CURATELY. In cases where/ the 
spelling of a name Is not certain — 
ask the subscriber. Be sure/ to get 
full information, as route /number, 
box or street number, town ind state, 
together with correct initials. Where 
a new subscription is started, it is 
practically impossible for/the manage- 
ment of the automobile/campaign to 
fix up the order, when nothing is 
known as to the accurate address of 
the subscriber. , 

\ MAKE YOUR REPORTS LEGIB- 
LY AND ACCURATELY — KEEP 
-WORKING CONSISTENTLY AND 




BASE BALL! 

Sunday, July 11 

at FAIR GROUNDS 

i 



vs. T. R. Falls 




"The UistincfSon 

and end o a soundly constituted man 
is his labor, 
his faculties. 



Use is. inscribed on all 

Use is the end to 

exists. As the tree exists 

for its friit. so man for his work 



which he 



Without 
nor reach 
there is n 
AU right. 



■ vork, man cannot survive 

his destiny; with work, 

> end to what he may do." 

LET'S DIG INI! 



Hard i ork never hurt anybody. 



Get over 
that hurt 




that idea. The only thing 
anyone is a desire NOT to 
work. HARD WORK ACHIEVES 
ANYTHD G IN THE WORLD!! 

>rld admires a worker— a 
rker. And it not only ad- 
mires bin, but it gives him .just 
about wh itever he wants. YOU'VE 



3 



This game is to start promptly at 3 o'clock- 
and is sure to be a hot one. 





M^^i^^^ |,^^!fe ;, f ;;^i^aa^ 




-*- 



!c— 



FRIDAY, JULY o, ipao 



ROSEWOOD 



r«# 



The Parochial school picnic held 
last Sunday afternoon at the Klnda, 
church grounds in commemoration 
of the closing of a successful" five 
weeks term of school under the di- 
rection of Mrs. Inga Berg of Thief 
River Falls, was a very demonstra- 
tive and educational entertainment 
and- brought out several hundred at- 
tendants many of which came by car 
•from nearby cities including Thief 
Hiver Falls, Viking, Newfolden, Holt 
and others. A short speech was 
given by Kev. G. Larson of Thief 
River Falls and a lengthy program in- 
cluding many selections of readings, 
solos, duets, neqitatfons, etc., was 
t very admirably rendered by the school 
Tho music arid singing was 
lead by Mrs. Rudolph Sagmoen ot 
Anita. Refreshments of various kinds 
were on sale after the program 1 on 
the grounds and the afternoon was 
very pleasantly passed in eonversa 
tiou and the meeting of friends. 



Mrs. Axel Axelson is at this writ- 
ing in a very low condition caused by 
blood poinoning of the knee following 
an infected small ulcer by ipoisonous 
weeds when picking strawbeiries. 
She is under constant care by physi- 
cians from Thief River Falls and her 
condition is considered very serious. 
. Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Holm, John 
Sagmoen and Joel Shoberg spent Sat- 
urday evening at Warren to attend 
the county fair. 
/ Gust Opsctb. and Axel Jjarson were 
home from Radium where they were 
last Sunday to visit withTriends. 

Another sharp decline in the beef 
prces in South St. Paul has caused 
the Ko..owood Shipping Association 
to postpone tiieir next shipment of 
■ mixed stock until Saurday, July 17, 
to watch the trend of (lie market. 
Local buyers are tills week offering 
as low as '!',{. cents for canner cows 
and slightly above for better grades. 

Joel' Shoberg and .Axel Mom. spent 
Sunday afternoon at Hazel K% guests 
with the J. Shoberg family. 

Miss Annie Bloin. w' o has been 
employed east of Thief. River Fails 
for .some time returned home this 

.Uiss Klhei' ICron will leave the be- i 
ginning of this week for Fargo where ! 
she will seek employment for the • 
summer months. ' 

Miss' Laura Kron. spent Sunday at 
Wylie to visit with friends and rel- 
atives. . 

Mr. /and Mrs. Alec Gui'lscth from 
Pinewood, are visiting this week with 
the Anton Gullseth people in town. 

A number of friends, neighbors 
and relatives surprised Mrs. Guliseth 
northwest of town last .Sunday >n 
/ ■mmemora^'on of. her birthday. 
Emil Mellein from Nekoma, N. D., 
/ n:rived the latter part of the week 
to visit with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. T. Melleni (Turing the fourth. 

The Riudnl ladies aid hold their 
monthly meeting at the homo of Mrs. 
Gust ' jcnlikeu fast Tuesday afternoon 
and the' young peoples' society of 
the same congregation met at the 
church tile same evening, both meet- 
ings were well attended and success- 
ful.- Rev. Geo. Larson of Thief River 
'Falls was in attendance. The next 
i'adies aid meeting will be held at 
the home of Mrs. M. Jarsaw on the 
afternoon of August 3. 

Miss Inga Saugen. a nurse from 
the Tljef River Vaf!/, hospital is 
spending her vacation with her 
mother north of town. 

Tile A. C. Vorseth family in com- 
pany with some friends spent Mon- 
day at Middle River as guests with 
the Kmif Peterson family. 

Lars Lee a former resdent of this 
p!ace who is now' making his home 
farther south in .the state, arrived 
here Saturday morning for a few 
days visit with friends. 

Mrs. James Johnson and son, Earl, 
arrived Saturday morning from Thief 
River Falls to visit over the fourth 
a. the John Heilquist home. 

Gust Nnkkeu returned last week 
from Fargo aiid Moorhend where he 



i 



THE TRIBUNE 



GETTING BELGIUirS UVESTOCK BACK TO A PEACE-TIME BASIS 





Those swimming in the neighborhood of 
the bridge, are hereby warned not to 
swim under the bridge or on the south side. 
It is especially requested that all bathers 
stay on the north side of the bridge, in 
order to avoid accidents to those on the 
bride who race-^5ack and forth. Please 



v,« •;.'' ! - /r^mg aU European' countries In reconstruction. Although being affected mora 

£&" * u ,JL ^ ieVaM^m Sf „£ V eTa n a ? ,m of h - er agricultural tofricts she fs rapidly get! 
«Wm" •", ', *aere.aid from the allied countries will not be needed. Above is a scene taken t» 

- ^_ n ? J™,™^. .' 1 " 1 - Th « j*™ 6 Ehow vras 'organised by the Provincial* 

/) SHEENFUL CROWN 
OF NEW LISERE 

ft. 



give this warning immediate attention. 

E. O. ERICKSON 

Chief of Police 




Ms new summer hat is ■.■<> 

lusive with its crown of sheen- 

lisere. The band of rose buds 

base of the crown pleasing- 

conceals the origin of that 

of tinted -satin which casts 

' olorful glow in reflected light 

on milady's face. The short brim 

the left and back gives the 

<je! a chic appearance — almost 

inclined to rakishness. 



exel 

fu! 

at 

ly 

brim 

its y 



model 



"Fritz" Rafteseth came Saturday 
from Pipestone where he is employed 
to spent the fourth with his parents 
here. 

Herbert Carlson and Miss Gena 
Aos left Saturday morning by car 
for devils Lake, N. D., where they 
win visit for the day with Mr. Carl 
sons profiler, Helmer, who is em- 
ployed at that place. , 

Mr and Mrs. A. H; Halvorson from 
Clay county, arrived here by car' ; 
last Saturday for a brief visit with 
Mrs. Halvorson's brother, Anton Gull- 
seth, md other relatives. 

Fre Idie Johnson of Holt left on the 
Thursday evening train here for Thief 
"'■ — Falls where he will attend to 




Big Reasons 
Why You Should 
Prefer an Ideal 



River 



business. 



James 

was 

burial 



Cooperstown. 
ably the most complete mono< 



snent o an American writer in exist 
ence s Ccoperstown, a picturesque 
village in northwestern New York on 
Lake Otsego, near the source of the 
Susquehanna. It was named after 



spent a week to visit and attend to 
business. Crops between Fargo and 
this place, according to Mr. Xakken, 
are in fair shape but not much ahead 

;of this community excepting certain 
stretches which are not infected with 
the destructive milk weed and in con- 
sequence show more even seasonage. 
• Swen Swenson spout a few days 
of this week attending to business 

•matters in Newfolden. 

Ranker ami .Mrs. A. S. HnVia, John 
Sagmoen and Joel Shoberg left Sat- 
urday evening for Warren to attend 
the county fair. 

Mrs. 'IV Alellein left. Wednesday 
mornin/f for Viking where she wilt 
visit for a day with her daughter, 
Mrs. S. S. Xordgnard. 



Fenimore Cooper's father; it 
le writer's home and Is his 
place; the scenes of his vari- 
ous stiries are laid around It and the 
greate • part of its population nt pres- 
ent is made up of his relatives or 
connections by marriage. In fact the 
whole place is flavored with the es- 
sence of Cooperism. A well-worn 
path t > the writer's grave In the old 
village churchyard gives mute testi- 
mony ■ o his popularity. 



Wm. J. BROWN 

Lawyer 

F ormerly County Attorney 

Marshall County 

Offic: Over First National lJank 

TJ ief River Falls, Atinnesota 



Offic 



C. M. ADKINS 

Physician and Surgeon 

e, Over First National Bank 




^'S. C 22f i<lf-The Rmnel y Id «l <»n't help but be a big capacity machine- it is built 

Th^n2fhfl <ri ^ffJf in8 «" «" grain is jurt as important as producing it-of course 
S^firS^^ ''Save-aU^e-grata-IdcaT-i!, sating it. \n\£ %£* 
^lame^^wasL rakta ^- dr y- wrt OT frozen-the Ideal handles all jobs 

^^anlSeHlS'^' 1 f °r r *£?" "*? W * e chaffer ««• ** ^stable sieve 
$thwH£st7 und« ?t^2^*«™ ,d S" 1 ?! - ? guarantee of a perfect job of cleaning 

SSr^eHeribtS " « n,b ? 1 ^, P"» apart, sag or rot, as spliced or bolted member. 
STllJhL^ L,w « ?^! 3°*-*U», Posts, deck rails, straw rack sides. ThenTthere 
tout Tha?; S^S",*", *"£' ^ »? • h ?k« banger bearings running in aa?us£bto 
ooxes. That's the kind of construction that insures long life. »"J"»«idio 

«»^0«mi-Vibration makes „ young machine old before it has served its time-it 
£o^na£ e in b &ea!^4 out of ahgnment. C«»£tal£l£rf3 

•™~££ mT? -5. lacat ~ perfect balancing of the cylinder— make the Rumelv so steadw 
ronntog that when comparted to other separators vibration simply does nofoL 

fai^^'J^ZTj 9 !"!^! t0 f™" 1 i °" ide tte Ideal to e rt at «» working parrs. 
machbMX,^S T»^ dj ^ mentB ^^P^Wo" of the blast are on the outside ofthe 
n^btae, also aU od and grease cups, where you can take care of them while the Ideal is 



The Ideal Is built in five sizes— 22x36, 28x44, 28x48, 32x52 and 36x60. 




Thief River Falls, Minn. 




IIKK.MAN.SOX- IIAHDWAKE CO. » 



-fit 



Page Foufr 



The Tribune 

SBMI-WBBKLT 



ESTABLISHED 1001 



Official County Paper 



Eennlntton Printing Cpmpanr 
' Publishers 



•— I 



Thos. A. Way, Presidont 



PnbliBhed every ' Tuesday and Friday 

at 

Thief Hirer- Falls, Minn. 



B. B. McWilliams, Editor and Manager 



Foreign Advertising Representative 
THE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 



.- Botered as second clnss matter at the 
post office at Thief River Fails, Minn., 
mnder the Act of March 3, 1879. 



We hope every , business man in 
Thief River Fails will take an in- 
terest in the sweet clover this year. 
The crop has been planted by many. 
farmers and others for the - first time. 
Sweet clover will do more for Pen- 
nington county than any other crop. 
The business men have the same 
general' interest in the crop as the 
farmer. Drive out into the-, country, 
i'ook over the sweet clover fields, talk 
with the farmer and learn all- about 
it. . You will know when you come 
back, you win feel better, and you 
will be a sweet clover booster. - 



Wonder if the San Francisco con- 
vention will', endorse the stand taken 
by President Wilson in issung a par- 
doi{ to Kate "Richards O'Hara the 
anarchist, who in a speech in North 
Dakota referred to the mothers of 
boys in the service of their country 
as brood sows? This incident will 
undoubtedly cost the democratic 
nominee sevcra.' women votes, as it 
should, for a person of the O'Hara 
stripe is" not. fit to be at large. — Do- 
land S. D. Record. 



James M. Cox, the democratic nom- 
inee for president, is governor of Ohio. 

.He is a so-called personal liberty 
man and is e tossed as a wet. He is 
a self made man, and smokes a pipe. 
He uomes up from the people and 
they call him Jim. He received. the 
news of his nomination and went 
first to the composing room of his 
newspaper to tell the printers, and 
next in a taxi at four in the morning 
to break -the .news to his best friend. 
Later he went- ai'one to the cemetery 
and bowed down in reverence and in 
prayer at his mother's grave. The 
burden of eight years of Wilson has 
doubtless placed the prize of the 
presidency beyond the reach of any 
- democrat. at this' time. Upon issues 
we may agree, or disagree with pro- 
.'" priety and respect for those who differ 
with us. To the sentimentalists who 
are shedding tears of regret over the 
horror of the Cox nomination, we 
would suggest that the hardest thing 
the republicans wiYI have to meet in 
the coming campaign is the extremely 
high standard, - outstanding Ameri- 
canism and honest, hardy manhood 

^represented by candidate Cox. .We 
may beat* him. If we do it must be 
on issues. James 51. Cox is a man, 
honors the party 'that has named him 
as it's standard bearer. 



Our office has been most highly 
honored during the past week. We 
were favored with calls by several 
. notable and eminent men. Among 
them Hon. Jate Preus, republican 
nominee for governor. Mr. Preus is 
a delightful, geniai-and common good 
man.* He is sure of election, and will 
be one of the big men of the state 
to occupy the Governor's chair. Min- 
nesota has made a wise selection in 
"Mr." Preus. . 

E. C. Bla'ckert, of Selkirk, Mani- 
. toba. While Mr. Blackert has a po- 
sition of importance as a business 
man and prominent citizen in* Mani- 
toba affairs, we like" best to. remem-" 
:ber hinuas all o!d timer, and type set. 
ting editor, journalist i and diplomat 
for twenty years on the Spirit Lake, 
(Iowa) Beacon. Mr. Blackert called 
on |owii friends in the city and made 
' "them linppVt """'■•apMiWi-'i-v— ■ ; 

Hon. A. B. Funk, home in Dps 
.Moines, citizen at large. Mr. Funk has 
farms and friends in Iowa,/Minne- 
'sota and Manitoba. He was with 
Mr. Blackert during all the^ years of 
Beacon ownership. He is/known in 
Iowa as the premier editorial" writer 
of the-state. He lias hud large hold- 
ings of land for many /years in Pen 



V? f WV^^ 



'■ r." 1 ^ 1 ^^. . MJTK 3t.F 



aas^aafiffiffis 



^asKrTi53^?nES^?ri; 



■;■;.£" 



FRIDAY, JULY 9, 1930 



Mitchell Palmer (if that is "stflrthe" 
approvefl form of his name), Attor- 
ney-Gem ral of the United States. 



large against Mr. Post is 
Mr. Paitaer, who says that 



IJ'OT 
Hi/ ci 



niiiKtnn anil' adjoining counties. He 

- has entensive Kind interests in 

; Manitoba jind makes/annual - trips here 

to look after his pi^pcrty. Mr Punk 

Was for .many yea'rs in' the Iowa 

• •- senate' He declines the governor- 

ship of Iowa because of illness in 

: his family, wits a candidate for 

United States /Senator. He has been 

.':■ drafted three iimes by Iowa governb s 

• ■U to fill Important places on boards at 

"critical tinier, and is now chairman 
of .the Industrial Commission. Mr. 
Funk has had many honors at the 
J hand.; o{ Iowa people. He has de- 
served Aem ail. It is suoh men as 
Mr. FUnk with his high ideals, strict 
";., integrity and substantial ability that 
'L have/given Iowa a conspicuous place 
'in the '-nation as il safe, sane and re- 
,.-,.liablo state.. ; . . - 

'PAJMIER, PROVOCATEUR 
~\Vhirh is the worse, to be a passive 



The c * 
made by 

the Assif tant Secretary of Labpiyhas ; 
shown h msetf a sympathizer ;iVlti' 
"Reds" 1 f the worst 'type, has made 
"wholesale jail deliveries," has 
leased sqlf -confessed Anarchists, has 
cancelled' hundreds of legal warrants 
issued by t^he Departments of Justice, 
has nullified the purpose of Congress 
in passing .' the deportation act, has 
nm'igned the Department of Justice 
with "outrageous, and unconscionable 
falsehoods," and has committed other 
heinous kcts too numerous to men- 
tion. I 

So much Jor Mr. Post. N'ow what 
of Mr. ] 'aimer himself? Here is a 
part of he astounding indictment 
which it made against his depart 
nn»nt: | - 

Mainti nance of agents provocateurs 
for the purpose of joining and becom. 
ing offic srs of radical organizations 
and incit ing their members to crimin* 
■a! activities; wholesale, arrests and 
imprisonment of men and women 
without warrants or pretense of war- 
rants, and illegal searches and siez- 
ures, in violation of the Constitution ; 
forgery by agents of the department 
to make] cases against innocent per- 
sons; criminal thefts of money and 
other personal property from Tlc- 
tims of rhids by agents of the depart- 
ment; cruel and unusual ppnlshments 
visited upon prisioners taken into 
custody with and without warrants; 
the use of Government funds in vio- 
lation of law to • spread newspaper 
propaganda"; compulsion of prisioners 
to be witnesses against themselves; 
brutal and indecent treatment of wo- 
men; refusal -to let prisioners com- 
municate! with friends or lawyers. 

These uimazing accusations against 
Mr. Palmer's Department of Justice 
are backed up with chapter and verse, 
with specifications of names, dates 
and places, with literal citations from 
official documents of the Department! 
Here, for example, is a statement 
concerning the treatment of some men 
who were arrested, on suspicion of 
being Anarchists; 

Iu the! jail' were four punishment 
rooms alj alike, unventilated and ut- 
terly dark, four feet three inches by 
eight feet ten inches, with solid eou- 
cree floors and no furniture of -any 
kind, and pi'aced over, the pump room 
of the boiler so that the temperature 
became unbearably high. A number 
of supposed Anarchists or Commun- 
ist prisioners, probably ten or fifteen, 
were -confined in these rooms for per- 
iods of tljirty-six to sixty hours. Dur-. 
ing theirfimprisonment, in .the suffo- 
cating heat, they were gven one glass 
of water [and one slice of bread every 
twelve hours. Some of them on be- 
ing released had to be revived before 
they could be carried to their cells. 
These prisioners Were practically 
buried alive -for Ave months, being 
even denied the privilege of seeing 
their relatives. That there were no 
substantial charges against at least 
ten of them is known by' the fact that 
after being hei'd in 510,000 bail for 
two months and a half, these ten 
were released' without bail. 

No, that was not in the Petropoul- 
ovsky Fortress in the reign of Alex- 
ander Hit and .Pobieodononseff . It was 
in the jail at Hartford, Connecticut, 
under tile Administration of Presi- 
dent Woodrow "Wii'son and his Attor- 
ney-General, Mr. Mitchell Palmer. 

To th: s appalling , indictment the. 
Attorney General' pleads in three, dis- 
tinct an< separate ways. To some 
counts he pleads not guilty, declar- 
ing that they are "vicious, slander- 
ous, and unlawful [sic]." To some«he 
pleads guilty, and glories in the fact. 
Thus he iupports his agents in requir- 
ing excel sive bail, quite regardless of 
the Coin titutional prohibition there 
of. Als > he heartily approves tne 
practice of refusing to let prisioners 
have the benefit of counsel, in order 
that the prosecution may extort from 
them al; possible information and 
confessit ns before they are advised 
as to tleir legal rights; a piece of 
cynical immorality for which it 
would b difficult to find a parallel. 

His third answer is an impudent 
attempt to discredit his accusers, on 
the old n-iuciple of "No case; abuse 
the oppe site attorney." With an asi- 
nine aff' ictaion of ignorance of men 
who art his professional superiors, 
he queries "if they are reputable 
lawyers, ' and declares that he, the 
Hon. Mitchell Partner, is. "not much 
impress! d" by- them. Perhrps they 
do not imouuf" to much in his esti- 
mation. One of them is merely the 
Dean oi perhaps the most famous 
University Law School in America, — 
that of ] larvard ; five others are mere- 
ly professors of law in four of -the 
foremos ; American schools, of law, 
one is nerely a former Judge of a 
United States Circuit Court, one is 
merely » former United States Dis- 
trict Attorney, and so on. Why 
should le Hon. Mitchell ;■■ Palmer be 
"much impressed" by them? Prob- 
ably he was "not much ' impressed," 
eithi|: by the stinging words of Jndge 
Andersen, of the United States Dis- 
trict Court in Boston, which we have 
already quoted, but which are worthy 
of repetition in confirmation of these 
new ch irges against the Depart- 
ment 01 Justice. Said Judge Ander- 
son: 

I wis It you woulB show one case in 
which I he Department of Justice has 
the authority to arrest persons, and 
ho'.d tl em for two weeks without 
warran s. A more lawless proceed- 
ing is 1 ard to conceive- I can hardly 
sit em t le bench as an American citi- 

T 



/friend to Anarchists, or an active pro-' 

vocatemr of anarchy? If even ha't 

that is responsibly said about them Is 

true, that is the choice which we must.!."'. 

make between Mr. Louis .'f.";' Post, ' *™."am restrain W indiguatibn 
. Assistant Secretary of Labor.and Mr. view v ith horror such proceedings 



isl§§li 

"""""' "Tl 



Mr. Palmer charges Mr. Post with 
seeking to transform America into 
somethingiJiSe<-the Bus a of the So- 
' " its.. BIT bjrjpig testimony of a 
sen reputabiwSwyers, by the judg- 

pt of a dil^^iished Judge p"fa* 
-federal Cejnrt,-'and by hhr own >de- 
flsnt con|issip8, Mr.- Palmer is iry- 
iiig to transform America into some- 
tthing Ukec-a mixture of the Russia 
of ''the sijzirs andvthe France of the 
lettres des'feachet.- Recurring, then, to 
ttis question" already asked, ye must 
recktm that Mr. Palmer is by far the 
worse offender of the two. That is 
partly because of his higher official 
rank than Mr. Post's; partly because 
the doing of injustice by the Depart- 
rflient of Justice is incomparably re- 
volting; and partly and chiefly be- 
cause such practices as his are far 
more likely to tempt or impel men 
into Anarhism than all the doctrin- 
aire fiddlihgs of Mr. Post. It is no- 
torious that Anarchism and Nihilism 
were provoked and fostered in Russia 
by precisely such proceedings as those 
with which Mr. Palmer's depart- 
ment is charged and which in part 
he admits and seeks to uphold; and 
it is axiomatic that like causes pro- 
duce like effects. That is why we 
must regard Mr. Palmer as probably 
the most perncious provocateur of 
Bolshevism and Anarchy now menac- 
ing the peace and integrity of the 
United States. — Harvey's. 



OLD COMPANY FLOURISHES 
Lincoln Journal: The Hudson Bay 
company began its work in Canada 
250 years ago, when it had the entire 
field at its disposal. It may surprise 
the public to know that the encroach, 
ment of civilizaion has not reduced 
the number of branches maintained 
by'this organization. It has 155 fur 
posts thruout Canada, the largest 
number in its history, and it is pre- 
paring to extend its operatons during 
the coming year. This will be done 
by opening new posts far in the north, 
by building and operating boats, and 
by cultivating the field of general 
commerce in the well settled poitions 
of the country. The high price of 
fur has led to the intensive cultiva. 
tion of the industry: Canada is ex- 
pected to furnish a permanent supply 
of pelts, not only from its unsettletl 
northern districts but from the fur 
farms which are being established 
here and there thruout the dominion. 



ness of judgment, his appreciation of 
the needs of todcy- and of tomorrow, 
his lovo^ of the people from - whom 
he camegand of whom he is jiae, and 
his faitB!^i.them;.Jiis -maapificent 
grasp "tfeiarge aj&us£rhis grffat na- 
tive ability. andaSs training in states- 
manship,- his regard for the opinion 
of others, his esperiaace-and success 
in' the Handling. .of men, nis proper 
appreciation of his country's position 
as a responsible factor in .'ne world's 
future,-but with the fullest realiza- 
tion of the absolute importance: of our 
own supreme nationalism, his sterl- 
ing Americanism, his righteous char- 
acter and manhood, and withal his- 
thorough humanness, all qualify him 
in the most exceptional degree for 
the tremendous responsibilities which 
will soon be his. He will make a 
splendid candidate and a great presi- 
dent. The country will love, him, 
honor him, trust him and follow him, 
just as all who know him love and 
trust him, and the world will honor- 
him. 

Too, in Governor Cooiidge we have 
a candidate for vice-president that 
measures up to every requirement ot 
a presidential candidate. Fortunate 
indeed is the country. 



tefl' many 'acts "of vandalism, includ- 
ing the destruction of the Kiev 
cathedral. Whether or not reports of 
savagery are true, there was never 
any legitimate reason for the Uka- 
raine campaign. A was purely a 
raid for more territory and power. 
It has still further delayed th^ open- 
ing of Russia's grain ports to the 
wWrldii It has needlessly added to 
the suffering of .eastern Europe. 



SPLENDID CANDIDATES 

Statement by Will H. Hays, Chair- 
man, Republican National Committee. 



Senator Harding possesses just 
those vital qualities of. mind and heart 
necessary today and in the time just 



POLAND'S FAILURE 

It is America's duty in friendship 
to warn Poland against the disastrous 
imperialism of her government, 
whenever there U excitement in 
eastern Europe it is usually because 
another Polish adventure in militar- 
ism is afoot. Poland is becoming the 
new Prussia of Europe. Domineer- 
ing sabre rattling seems to be the 
ambition of her most Conspicuous 
public men. 

America has long sympathized 
with Poland. It was the insistence 
of this country's representatives at 
the peace conference that gained for 
I'o'and her Baltic port of entry at 
Danzig. Without America's aid, Po- 
land would still be partitioned among 
Russia, Germany and Austro-Hun- 
gary. Free Poland has stirreel Amer- 
ica's imagination. But, America can- 
not approve the Germanized spirit 
which has grown in Warsaw since 
the Poles were given their indepen- 
dence. 

The latest of Peiland's mad adven- 
tures is ending disastrously. The be- 
lief of the Polish army that it could 
successfully invade Russia after the 
European powers had failed to de- 
stroy Russia's ever renewed military 
strength, has met with its predicted 
failure. After j( spectacular dash into 
Ukraine and the capture of Kiev, the 
Ukrainian capital, the Poles have had 
to abandon the city and retreat to- 
ward their own territory. 

They are reported to have commit- 



THEY SIMPLY LIED 
DeSmet Independent: Speaking ot 
profiteering, grafting, or whatever 
you want to call it, we find it al- 
most everywhere, but it is the big 
industries engaged in the manufac- 
ture of necessities of life such as 
shoes and clothing that attracts the 
most'attention because everyone suf 
fers from it. Just now we are com 
polled to pay two or three prices for 
clothing. The boost in clothing prices 
the manufacturers have been telling 
us for the past two years, is due 
to the scarcity of wool. They told us 
that it would be ten years before the 
supply of wool would catch up with 
the demand and the. trade get onto a 
normal basis. They lied to us. Today 
the warehouses in the large centers 
are full, and the wool buyers refuse 
to make any kind of a bid on the 
1920 wool crop. The bulk of the 1919 
crop is still in the warehouses. Shoes 
tare much the samti. Sca4citfy of 
leather they told us was responsible. 
It was going to be years and years 
before there would be enough to go 
around. Of course, they lied, to us. 
Hides are selling today cheaper than 
for several years. Art Back, the meat 
market man, shipped a cow hide the 
latter part of last week, and what do 
you think he got per pound? .Seven 
cons a pound. The average cow T hide 
at that prtey* brings about $4.20, 
with the freight to be deducted from 
that. At that rate it . takes about 
three cow hides to buy one pair of 
ceunmon fine shoes, or two hieles to 
buy a pair of very orelinary every 
(lay shoes. This talk of short pro- 
eluction. of raw material is" .mostly 
"bunk." 



favorable season is best evidenced by 
the very rich heavy and abundant 
tame grass crop. The rye, especially 
the winter rye, is excellent. Wheat,, 
oats, barley all fine. We think flax, 
shows better than it ever has. ; The 
plant is weil advanced, hardy land 
vigorous. All garden crops are inost 
excellent. The pist two or three, 
weeks has been a trifle dry in some, 
places. We have - had many small 
local showers but no general rain. 
Nothing is suffering for rain. The 
numerous new fields. of sweet clover 
have done tine everywhere. Every 
one who has planted sweet clover is 
delighted with the astnd It niean^ 
much to "get on" with a good re- 
sult tlie first year with this great 
crop, and we. are "on" this year with 
sweet clover and everything else. 
Good old Pennington county is bring- 
ing home the bacon again as she al- 
ways does.- Mr. Farmer. Laborer, 
Businessman, a big business is look- 
ing you straight in the face, get 
ready for it. 



The Times almost said something 
jjn (heir ThurM:la.t edit,Soiv They 
straddled as usual, with a leg for the 
republicans, a leg for the democrats, 
a leg for the non-partisans and two 
legs dangling., reserved for the La- 
Foilett and prohibition parties. Some 
centipede, the Times is. on public 
(lucstions. with a leg for all of thorn 
and willing to i-ide anything that 
produces. 



NOTICE OF ANNUAL SCHOOL 
MEETING 

Notice is hereby given that the 
annual meeting of the qualified 
voters of Independent School District 
number eighteen of Pennington 
couty, Minnesota, will be [held at the 
Auditorium iu the city of Thief River 
Fails in said county on July 17. 1920, 
at seven o'clock P. M.. for the pur- 
pose of ejecting two directors, each 
for a term of three years, to succeed 
F. F. Haynes and II. S. Dahlen, 
whose terms will expire, and to trans- 
act any other business which may 
come before the meeting 

The following aie the names of 
the candidates for the e>llie-e of school 
director for whom applications have 
been filed and their names be placed 
on the ballot as such candidates at 
said meeting, to-wit : None. 

.July 7, Ji)20. 

1'. O. Myhrum 

Clerk. 



Notice To Contractors 

Scaled proposals will be r 

at the; ollicc uf the Tuwn e 

the Town of North, t'ounty 1 

ningtem. Stale of Mhinrsota 



-cciveel 

eric of 

f l'cn- 

until 



Two oYluck 1". M. on the .".1st day 
eif July 19U0 for the const rur! ion of 
two piers and one abutment on the 
Long Uridge. Plans for the proposed 
work may be seen at the Town clerk's 
ollicc ThieTKiver Falls. Minn. 
' July 7th. Wl*. 

T.. .II. I'.jorke 
Town <"erk. Town of North. 
July !l-l(i-2:i 



The crop situation in rennington 
comity, according to all reports, and 
in appearance was never better. The 



FOUND — Pl'ItSK. HAS SAME OF 

Hoy Peterson inside. Call at Tri- 

\ bunc. ' o-l-l 





SUGAR, SUGAR, You may have 100 pounds 
now, get your canning sugar $29.35 



Fancy Toilet Soap, Special 8c per bar 
Lenox Soap, 10 bars for . . 50c 
5. .cans Sweet Corn, 5 to customer 90c 
Large Bottle Catsup, . . . 27c 



5 cans Early June Peas ,. . $1.10 

Only 5 to each customer 

Large Package Borax soap chips 30c 
Coffee, reg. 35c, Special at . 31c 



MEAT SPECIALS 



Fresh Killed, No. 1 Chickens . 30c 

Beef Roast . . . 19c 

Beef Chuck Roast . . . 23c 

Beef Rib Roast . . 25c. 

Veal Stew . . . 16c 



Veal Shoulder Roast 

Veal Leg Roast 

Home rendered lard, extra fine, 

Pickled Salt Pork . . 



20c 

25c 
25c 
23c 



We pay the highest cash prices for all butter, eggs, and stock, 
and other produce. See us before selling your goods, and be- 
fore buying meats and groceries; we can save yon money. 
Use our free delivery^ system.. Phone No. 115 

Simonson'siMeat & Grocery 







O 



V 



:W— 



, . TUESDAY, JULY.6 > ,'i 9 ao 




'^^^^^^^^^^^^P^l^^^^^i^^Pi^^P^^^P^^ii^^Wi^Wf^ 



And Thence. Your Success in The Tribune's Great $3,60Q Automobile 
Campaign Depends on Your Subscription Work During the Second Period 



Monday morning, July 1 2th, the automobile campaign enters 
a new period. 

There are three weeks of this period— three weeks during 
which the hottest fight of the whole campaign is. almost certain 
to develop— three weeks during which YOU will win or lose. 
Every day of the next three weeks wifl be crammed full of oppor- 
tunity and offering to candidates the prospect of realizing life- 
time dreams. During the last period the real fight will come— 
during the last p eriod the decision of the campaign will come. 

Look over the list below. You will find it much shorter than 
at any past time, but you will also find that every one of those 
candidates whos ; names appear on the list is a REAL WORKER 
bent on winning the Buick "Six" and working desperately to 
accomplish that object. . Between you and these contestants 



will come the last desperate struggle for votes to win— and it's 
up to you to see that YOU come out ahead. 

Make every day and every hour of the last three weeks 
count. You have as good a chance as any rival— it will be as 
easy for you to secure subscriptions as it will be for any of your 
opportunity. Don't allow; temporarr set backs to discourrge 
you— don't slowup because of the slight failure or disarrange- 
ment of your plans. To every worker will come the same dis- 
opponents and the same obstaccles as come to you. And if 
you are in the race to win you will not allow anything to retard 
you— you will go on over every obstacle until you win. 

The remaining time will pass quickly. All contestants are 
urged to start in Monday on a last, whirlwind campaign for 
votes during the Second Period- a last effort that will put them 
ahead. Make the last weeks win for you— DO YOUR BEST 
WORK NOW! 



Harry Lund, city ..... 
Mrs. Edwin O. Erieksou, 
O. L. Cronstrom, city . . , 
Mrs. L. Hermanson, cit; 
Robert. Halvorson, city 
Leo Miller, city 



District No. One 



CONTEST STANDING 



380,000 

:ity 423,000 

. . . 403,000 

10,000 

220,000 

10,000 



Mrs. Henry Sandee, KFD, city 10,000 
Julius Liden, RFD, city .... 10,000 
Mrs. Thomas Rowan, city . . 275,000 

Luella Peterson, city 00,000 

Mrs. H. F. Boreen, city 10,000 



Betty Johnson, Holt 90,000 

Sylvia Pierson, St. Hilaire 285,000 
Martha Aibin, Plummer . . 328,000 
Ethel Anderson, Wylie •....' 75,000 
Borghild Berg, Middle River 10,000 
Mrs. E. Singer, Erie 340,000 



District No. Two 



ftunder Tviot, liolden Viihey. 150,000 
Arthur Oi'son, Middle River 10,000 
Emma Anderson, Middle River 10,000 
B. O. Norby, Ooodridge. .... 110,000 
Mrs. C. E. Lundgreu, Viking (10,000 



First Capital; Prize— Buick 'Six' Cost $1,790.00 




Purchased from and on display at 
The People's Auto Company, Thief River Falls, Minn. 




/ 



j / The First Period of the vote schedule in 
the wonderful $3,600 automobile campaign 
comes to a close Saturday night, July I Oth, 
at midnight. During 1 he First Period every 
/ worker has been cons ;antly urged to obtain 
as many votes as poss ible. And every con- 
testant HAS DONE SO— so that the race 
comes to the turning >oint with the workers 
bunched closely-t-witli no worker with a 
really strong lead and no worker far behind. 
All contestants must i nake even harder and 
more succsseful efforts during the last weeks! 
Keep going, constantly, with but one object- 
ive in view—TO WIN THE BUICK "Six" 
OR NOTHING! And stick to that resolution 
until you win! ' 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES AND VOTE 
SCHEDULE 

Votes will be allowed on all pre- 
paid subscriptions to. The Tribune. 
No subscriptions will be accepted to 
count votes unless accrflnpanied by 
full amount in cash. 



FIRST PERIOD 
("Doube Vote" Period) 

From May 29th to July 12, Semi 
Weekly Tribune, by Mail or Carrier. 

Price Votes 
$ 2.00 10,000 
COO 50,000 
10.00 100,000 



1 Yrs. Sub. 
3 Yrs. Sub. 
5 Yrs: Sub 



SECOND PERIOD 

From July 12th to July 31st, Semi- 
Weekly Tribune, by Mall or Carrier. 

Price Votes 
1 Yrs. Sub. • . ? 2.00 5,000 

3 Yrs. Sub. , o 6.00 25,000 

5 Yrs. Sub. 10.00 50,000 



For further information, address 
Manager, Automobile Campaign 
vFhe Tribune 



MONDAY 



The second period of the vote schedule will open 
Monday, July 12th. The votes to be given on sub- 
scriptions during the coming three weeks— the last three 
weeks of the greatest campaign ever conducted in 
northern Minnesota- -have decreased in volume to some 
extent— but hard work will make up for that decrease. 
No matter if you did lose out, for any reason, during 
the First Period— the Second Period gives you an 
opportunity to win back lost ground, to regain the. lead 
which you have forfeited. The race is so close right 
.now, that the car may still go to anyone— no matter if 
that person is now in the lead or far behind.. Hard 
'work will win— and you've got to do that kind of work. 
Make the last weeks win a car for you—do your 
hardest and most efficient work during the last period 
VouCAN WIN! ■ 



Page Five 





ill 



>.; 



Page Six 



V 



$m TBffiUNE 



FRIDAY, JULY 9, 19*0! 



/ i, 




GERMANTOWN 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Struble "were 
guests 'at the :D. Dan home Tuesday 
evening. 

Mrs. Hans Dahl visited at the M.- 
Jobnson home Monday. 

Miss Hattie; Klockman was a Ger- 
mantown caller last Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Olaf Tharaldson and 
children, Silva and Gehart, and Henry 
Thurai'dson motored to the BendieK- 
son home Tuesday evening. 

Silva Beudickson was a caller at 
Dahls Thursday of the past week. 

Mrs. John I'hii'ipp visited at the 
C. Klockman home Friday. 

Mrs. Hans Dahl visited at the Mar- 
tiiius John>ou home last Monday. 

H. Bene 'was a caller at German- 
town last Monday. 

Miss Clara Johnson was a guest 
at the Henry Roller home last Tues- 
day. 

Miss Berlins Baggy left for Minne- 
apolis where she will visit friends 
for a coupi'e of weeks^ 

Silva Bendickson was a caller 5t 
Djihls Thursday evening. 

Florence Johnson, visited with rel-" 
ativcs and friends for some time.; 

Mrs. Emil Hanson visited at the 
Hans Dahi' home Tuesday. 

Bessie Holler was a Gerniantown 
caller last Tuesday. 

Messrs Oi'af and Henry ■ Tharald- 
son called at the. Bendickson home 
Friday. 

Bernard Bendickson returned from 
Garrison, X. D.," where he has been 
visiting for a: couple of weeks. 

Mrs. Ritze and children cf Thief 
River Pali's visited at the Carl Klock- 
man home over Saturday. 



.VIKING 

Sunday, July 18, the Sunday school 
children of the • Swedish Mission 
church will have their Sunday school 
festival' at the Peter Erickson farm. 

Mrs. Aj Axclson returned home 
from Winnipeg) Canada, last Mon- 
day evening, where she had visited 
with friends and acquaintances and 
also with her husband who has his 
business at that place. 

A large number of Viking people 
attended the Marshall county fair in 
Warren July 1, 2 and 3. 

Miss Hilda ! Hanson visited at the 
•home of her sister, T. Wasi'ey's, Sun. 
day. 

Frank Johnson, who is employed 
near Crookstoh, spent Sunday at his 

■ home here. 

Walter Liudell, of Oslo, spent Sun- 
day at his home in Viking. 
i Every body is busy these days 
; picking-wild strawberries which are 
reported to be quite plentiful this 
year. 

Mr., and Mrs. Peter Lindquist left 
: f or the cities, last week where they 
will. spend some time visitug at the 
j home 6t their daughter, A. Koh'f s and 
;ulso with numerous other relatives. 
| The Viking people .celebrated the 
15th at different p/aces, Red Lake 
j Falls, Middle. River Strandquist, etc. 
j Miss VeraAxelson of Winnipeg, 
! Canada, is visiting at her home at 
ipresent. 

■ ; Arthur Anderson left for St. Paul 
'.(Saturday evening for a few days 

•visit. 

The Albert ITornell family motored 
to Karlstad Sunday where together 
with their relatives, Enii'i Tornell's 
; of Warren and i'urnquists of Roseau, 
:thesy .spent a very pleasant day. 
i ' Services were held in the Swedish 
j Mission church last Sunday forenoon 
land evening. Rev. Segerstrop offlciat- 
|lu,t. 

; The young- peopi'es society will 
1 nicer in the (.■hureh Friday evening, 
July 9. A. Axelson will serve. Ev- 
| er.vbody is invited to attend. 

Mrs. John j Larson and Martha 
| Benson were guests with Mrs Loge of 
! Oslo several' days of last week. 



■a*...- rToudest Daddies and Wives in the U. S. 




Mas 

'OC'ARRENG. HARDING 

New pictures of the Republican 
rominees taken since they were 
B-med to lead the ticket — *nd tne 
pr"»d "I told you so" group of 
dad J1C3 and wives of the two fam-^ 
i!:e3. The picture ot the bouse is 



where the Republican National 
Committee will conduct its cam 
paign. It is the Christine rest' 
dence at Marlon, Ohio; next dooi 
to the home of Senator Sardine. 



Q07«rB0T Harding will mmlxmrn. "nla 
campaign from bis on trout 
porch — making only a fow major 
speeches — according to present 
plans. . 



Wait!— Don't Operate! 



Take Sto-li.gal, a doctor's prescrip 
tion for dissolving gall stones, and 
complicated sotmach ailments. 

One box gives instant relief in all 
cases of GALL STONES, liver and 
stomach trouble, such as indigestion, 
dyspepsia, chronic appendicitis, gas, 
sour stomach, ulcers, catarrh, pains 
in stomach and back, constipation, 
etc. Don't wait but get a box of 
Sto-li.gal from your druggist today. 
Price SI: Attention! No fake tes- 
timonials, but positive facts. Sto-IU 
gal has helped thousands of people 
and it will positively give you relief 



in all ailments mentioned regardless 
of your, age or duration of trouble. 
Write for free literature to Dept. F. 
Digestive Chemical Company, St. 
Paul, Minn. Sold in Thief Rive: 
Falls, by Dr. H. B. Newell. Lambert' 
Pharmacy, also leading druggist 
everywhere. 



VymilDINF Nlsht and MorhlniJ. 
'/llUJi!'jE> Hav Clean, Htallh, 
I* InEl^ £>•«». If tljey Tire, Itch. 
tor <^V?P J ^ S ' Smart or Burn, if Sore 
Vf\inCci/cO Irritated, Inflamed oi 
TUUR Lit J Granulated, use Murine 
often. Soothes. Refreshes. Safe fd 
Infant or Adult. At all Druggists Writefo 
free Eye Book. Hiiriu Ej» Bsnrir Co., CUcji 



Thief River Produce Co. 

Hens, light, per lb .14 

Hea' y hens, per lb .18 

Roosters, per lb ,10 

Turkeys, per lb .18 

Horse hides .03@.05 

hides - ■ .15 

e hides .04 to .05 

Eggs, per ddz. .30 

I.R. Co-Operative Creamery 

Butt'r, per lb .56 

Bart ?rfat, 'per lb .56 

Milk per quart .10 



Calf 
Hon 



KX^MAfi&mS 



;, Hanson & Barzen 

Wheat, No. 1 iiortliern, per bu. 
Wheat, No. 2 northern, per bu. 
Wheat, No. 3 northern per bu. 
Wheat, No. '4 northern, per bu. 
Durum wheat, No. 1, per bu. 
Durum wheat, No. 2, per bu. 
Durum wheat, No. 3, per bu. 
Dunlin whefif, No. 4, per bu. 
.Oats, per bu. : 
Rye. per bu. : 
Barley, per bu. 
Flax, No. 1, per bu. 
Flax, No. 2 per bu. 
Bran, per cwt. 
Sh.irts,' per cwt. 



Cracked Corn-j per cwt 
Whine corn,; per cwt. 
Hay, per bale 
Middlings., prr. cwt. 
Oil meal ! 



3.70 
3.60 
1.50 
2.90 
4.60 



THIEF RIVER FALLS PLEASED 

BY QUICK RESULTS 

Eyeryone is pleased with the quick 
results ot simple witchhazel, cam- 
phor- hydrastis, etc:, as mixed in La 
voptik eye wash. One man's eyes 
were so badly strained he could not 
read without pain. Two applications 
relieved him. A lady with weak, in- 
flamed eyes was greatly helped by 
ONE bottle. We guarantee a small 
bottle ofLavoptik to help ANY CASE 
of veak,- strained or inflamed eyes. 
F. J Stebbins, druggist. 



Making Pets of Pish. 
. It is probably not ' generally known, 
but fish can be made pets of just as 
any domestic animal. They gradually 
begin to know the person who feeds 
them, and when he or she approaches 
the aquarium they will show every 
sign of pleasure and delight, wagging 
their 1 tails as dogs do on the approach 
of their master. They will also re- 
spond to tile call of their name and 
come to the top of the aquarium when 
summoned. They also show signs of 
Jealousy, and their manner of life in 
the aquarium with their companions 
is an interesting source of study. 



the reply he got : "So have I. Weighs 
10 pounds. Not a beauty — looks like 
you. Come home." 



Beecher and Ingersoll. 
It ^happened at one time that Henry 
Ward Beecher and Robert Ingersoll 
met Ion a platform during a public 
meeting in' New York city, and both 
were speakers. During his address. 
Mr. Beecher incidentally referred to 
the splendid onitorical ability of 
Colo lei Ingersoll. The latter declared 
during his address that Ills utterances 
on the public platform against re- 
ligio 1 would have been Impossible if 
all 1 linisters had- been as broad and 
liber ll as Mr. Beecher. These pleas- 
antries were duly applauded by the 
press at that time. 

COULD GET NO HELP 
SO FARMS AT 82 




' Tith his farm property, valued 
more than a quarter million 
dollars,,; facing neglect,. Louis 
Shi ger of DuPage county, Illi- 
aoij,. 82 years old, is back in to 
7.0 :k harness and is setting a 
llv< ly pace. Be' was forced to 1: 
thrpugh the farm labor shortage. 



New Process in Sculpture. 
A process for producing bas-reliefs 
by photography is the fruit of the in- 
vention of an Italian scientist. The 
basis of the invention Is the property 
possessed by a film of chromium gela- 
tin of swelling in proportion to the 
intensity of the light falling upon it. 
The swelling is greater with a low 
than with a high intensity, so that the 
light passing through a photographic 
negative ,. - 'nces upon a chromium 
gelatin plaic a positive in distinct re- 
lief. The transparency of an ordi- 
nary negative, however, is not truly 
proportional to the relief of the orig- 
inal model, but by an ingenious auto- 
matic device involving double exposure 
•his difficulty is avoided and a nega- 
tive is obtained having its lights and 
shades correctly graded to produce 
he effect in bas-relief. 



Realty Something in a Name. 
The Hebrew nomenclnture is full of 
long and difficult names, but the most 
illustrious biblical characters, from 
Adam to Maccabeus, have borne names 
that slip smoothly from the tongue. 
The same is true of Greek and Roman 
history, as is illustrated by Pericles, 
Alexander, Cuesnr, Cicero, Augustus; 
and in more modern history by Leo, 
Charles, Edward, William, Cromwell, 
Napoleon, etc. American history fur- 
nishes no exception. Washington, Lin- 
coln, Grant, Sherman, Sheridan and all 
the presidents had fine-sounding 



A St Paul man was fishing in Lake 
Traverse recently. He caught a Great 
Northern pike, the biggest he had 
ever landed in his l'ong and busy life. 
He was elated. He was crazed- with 
joy, and he telegraphed his wife 
"I've got one. Weighs seven pounds 
and is a beauty." The following' is 



Win Fight on Yellow Fever. 
In 1910 the Rockefeller foundation 
sent a sanitary commission to Ecuador 
for the purpose of- arranging with the 
Ecuadorian government to take, the 
responsibility of eradicating yellow 
fever from Guayaquil. The proposal 
was accepted June 10, 1918, when a 
celebrated bacteriologist arrived and 
began his work. He succeeded In dis- 
covering the germ which causes yellow 
fever, his investigations promising to. 
produce not only a preventive, but 
also a cure f^or this malady. 



The "Lower Calling." ! 

The Principal- -Miss Brown, I wish I 
you would give up this idea of mar- j 
riage. The training of children is a far 
higher calling than the mere bearing j 
of them. 1 

The Teacher— Yes, Miss Matthews; ; 
but if It weren't for those of the lower 
calling, whom would you have to 
train?— Life. 



The One Food Above 



It is delicious- 
It is wholesome 

It is absolutely the only economical 
food to be bought today, 

FRESH EVERY DAY 

MOTHER'S BREAD! 




LUMBE 




plus 




' « ■ \ . 

This what we are giving to builders. Not 
a perfunctory kind of service, but real, honest- 
to-goodness help. From the time you first 
come to us — Mr. Home Builder — until your 
home is ready to occupy, we give you the best 
of our advice and assistance. 

Here are "Plus service" features — complete 
floor plans, detailed cost estimates, help in sel- 
ecting the best of lumber, paint, plumb'ing and 
fixtures. In short, we perform the duties of 
consulting architect and in many cases those 
of building contractor, when you buy lumber. 

The value of this building assistance would 
be hard to estimate in dollars and cents. We 
gladly give it, though, because it makes home 
building easier, eliminates mistakes, and is of 
real benefit to our patrons. 



Prichard Lbr. Co. 




CO-OPERATION 

•DEHIND the average financial success will 
be found the close co-operation of a loyal, . 
helpful bank. 

1 HE officers of this bank are particularly 
proud of its record in.that respect. 



CITIZENS STATE BANK 



. =_ — . :„ ^~— 



1 FRIDAY, JULY o, ipap 



MIDDLE HIVER'S CELEBRATION 

^ !■■■'■' 

AN UNPRECEDENTED SUCCESS 



\RQEST CROWD EVER SEEN 

ERE AND PROGRAM CARRIED 

OUT IN FULL 



(:|u— 



•^«j» '/ The celebration held here on July 
5th is. now amatter of history and it 
; is with feelings of pride and gratifi- 
. cation that the Pioneer lells about it. 
The day was ideal as! to weather and 
road conditions, and tile affair having 
been widely advertised, the people 
y came from far and near. We noticed 
people from Thief River Falls, St. 
Hilaire, -Warren, Oi'soJ Argyle, Green- 
bush, Holt, Xewfolden — in fact from 
Jll the towns and cities within a ra- 
lus of iifty miles. There were hun- 
eds of people too, who were strang- 
i to us and to. most of our tpwns- 
>ple, and whose placet of residence 
j do not know. In Aact half the 
. >wd were strangers, which indi- 
es that the attendants were drawn 
m long distances. • 
> . \nd the most gratifying part of the 

-»■''' tie matter, is, that: the monster 
/d was agreeably entertained by 
ogram of "something doing" all 
1 long. The Oslo band under the 
Worship of Prof. P. M. Kiedr'ow- 
of Minto, N. D., was on hand 
lptly ready for service early in 
morning and discoursed splendid 
.ic at frequent intervals all day 

i '* 

i.'he morning program in the hall 
s given exatcly as advertised, and 
it with an enthusiastic reception 
: the packed audience in the hail 
lich was jentirely inadequate to 
Id the people that would have liked 
hear it, there being ^hundreds who 
..ere unable to get into the buii'ding. 
The address by P. A. McClorunn was 
.along different lines from the usual' 
spread eagle Fourth of July oratory, 
<leai"ing with the present day prob- 
lems that confront the public. He 
held the undivided attention of the 
■audience and was henrily appiauded 
time and again. 

The street sports after dinner were 
pulled oft" promptly and we're full of 
■j^—pep. The ball game Commenced at 
about four o'clock between- Middle 
Eiver and St. Hilaire j was a warm 
one. Despite the fact -ithht our Vocal 
team has been mostly : on the losing 
side this summer, they won this 
game by a four to three score and 
\ put up a tine exhibition of base ball. 
Brazil and Grndin of- Thief River 
Fails were the battery for the locals 
which added -strengtn i to the team 
-and put -just the necessary confidence 
into the home boys to enable them to 
show what really is in them. 

Accompanying the. band was Kied- 
rowski's orchestra,' of Minto, com- 
' posed of Prof. Kiedrowski, four of 
his daughters and another young lady, 
who furnished the mus c for the bjg 
, dance in the Middle River hardware 
. garage. And say boy, they did fur- 
nish some sweil' dance music, that 
was thoroly enjoyed and appreciated 
by the big crowd of (lancers that was 
altogether too big for the floor space. 
< The dancing commenced . at sunset in 
the evening and was kept up until 
sunrise in the' morning. It is to he 
regretted that a bowery about four 
times the size of the garage was not 
provided. But, anyhow the crowd 
made the niost of the accomodations 
li hand and made a night of it. 



• k'°fi 



-3.'-W* 



:•'•!■■< 



l^$!p5P?i?^pKS!$^ 



THE TRIBUNE 



Page 7 



a&PENfru 




This new American photograph 
taken of {he French heavyweight 
champ, Georges Carpentier, shows 
best perhaps what is called his 
"hypnoticf eye." Carpentier is 
credited with dazing his opponent 
through his intense gaze. Car-' 
pentier's manager is shown whis- 
pering instructions to him.- Car- 
pentier meets Battling Levtnsky 
.in New Jersey early In October In 
his first American appearance. 



Hansen's 





tent moving picture show 



was an adc itional attraction not on 
the origina bills, and both it and 
Caspar's Sn ire's movies .were throng- 
ed atl after loon and- well into the 
night. It had been feared that the 
eating accomodations would not be 
sufficient tot accomodate the crowd, 
but with tile several stands serving 
coffee and hunch and the Lutheran 
ladies aid running two long lunch 
tabi'es, it appeared that no one went 
hungry. Of course nearly all auto' 
parties . brought their picnic dinners 
along else the crowd would have com- 
pletely swanped the eating places. 

There, are various estimates of the 
size of the crowd. M. N. Gullikson 
avers that he counted 460 automo- 
biles and knows he did not get any- 
where near all of them. .Brick Mo- 
din counted 150 cars at the bail game 
and that bunch were hardly misset 
from the streets. It is a reasonably 
safe, be' thai: there were between 600 
and TOO a ltos here, which would 
make the visiting crowd who came 
by autos fr>in 3000 to 3500. — Mid- 
dle River P oneer. 



The Business 
Situation 



INDUSTRY THE KEYNOTE 

By W. F. Schiluxo. Prominent Farmer ana Stoekman, Horthfield, Minn. 

„„Z? < V e '/. a "Jtanoefstanding in America, and this mis- 
understanding is costing us life, wealth, and happiness 
nifl r ^ re ° ™ asses ot peo P le wn0 aee things through 
hl^n ed le ? 8e3 V ™, ere is the on « °l<»s that has mistaken 
fhnrn^M "'P <*> f ° r United States, and has become so 
thoroughly steeped in the idea that gold is King that they 
S^w-fT? • up . the * orship of Almighty God and have 
Th» Khf' 61 " the worshlp ot tne Almighty dollar! 
£i! y « aTe . be ™ n ?S so Powerful and mighty that they have 

helnel L£ » rtd V^- r " lsotten wods with those who 
helped make it, and this means serious unrest 

h„ Z hi f 6 iS an » tI " sr r ela ss, honestly intentioned, who 
ft=r.w n '?\ ra, 5 sue . d J? HaD sburg hirelings into the be- 
lief that might is right, and that to labor for an honest 
dom ' wage ' no matter °ow large, is to be a scavanger in serf. 

We have been living in a golden age, and too fast. Money has been 
showered upon us because America is rich in everything that goes to make 
up a great nation-but we have made wealth so fast w! have forgotte? to 
tabulate our cit.zenship. and our country has become ailed with Traitorous 
Q?sio e ra 8 ^ AS ' Vh ° S * ° nly ° b3eCt iS t0 sow seeds of OtaMrtS ? ana 

What is the remedy? It is a long program, but is the only one that will 
bring results. Our children must be taught industry at home and in The 
schools. They must he taught the love of home and the art of L \™! 
building for the safety of a nation is in the homes we make and e l™ to P ™> 
tect They must be taught that the best milker or tradesman In the nete£ 
borhood is as great as the best foot ball player. When the press of the countS 
pays as much attent on to the man who produces thirty-five bushes of wheat 
per acre and helps him to market it, as it does to the fellow who is a scisSfflP 
pugilist product will he on the increase; and let me s^und a warning now 
that unless more attention is paid to a greater production in the near ■future! 
there will be cries for more -bread in America inside of twenty-five years 
„. La l tIy ; our <? eopl , e must learu t0 cooperate closer, and learn to know each 
UticaL S " SCC ' aI misunderstanato s to rathe? than finauTlal or 



Duns, discussing the business situ- 
•ospects fails to find the 



ation and p 

usual seasoi al influences sufficiently 

explanatory 

tation and 



of the shrink. Transpor- 
labor difficulties, mone- 
tary restrict ons and price uncertain, 
.ties are offered as prevailing causes. 
These are e ements that have lately 
combined, wjth some other phases, to 
appreciably curtail commercial .trans- 
actions, and the prevailing lull, in 
view of its paunes, may prove to be 
more than a passing development. 
' That f uudbmentaf economic chang- 
es are in progress, differing at bot- 
tom from those which have been wit. 
nessed on prevous occasions sineie 
the war's enjding, is not only demon- 
strated by movements in some lead- 
ing trades and industries, but also by 
the reversal of sentiment among both 
sellers and buyers, and by statistics 
of bank clearings and failures. . The 
business adjustment, moreover, is not 




confined to any one section of the 
country, although perhaps more ap- 
parent in the East than elsewhere, 
and the price declines which are a 
part of it are clearly not limited to 
the reduction sales at retail. 

That the main trend of wholesale 
markets is also downward is evi- 
denced by Dun's list of quotations, 
wheh again disclose more recessions 
than advances, and the continued 
disinclination of many nterests to 
commit themselves extensive. 1 }' for 
the future is largely based on ex- 
pectations of further prices reduction 
to follow. While the sudden and sharp 
fall of prices of some commodities, as 
of raw silk and raw wool, may not 
be duplicated in other lines, yet each 
week adds to the indication of yield- 
ing, which may later spread to food 
products if present prospects for 
abundant grain crops are realized. 

Briefed reports to Dun's from lead- 
ing centers bear out the agency's 
conclusions: 

Philadelphia— Manufacturers and 
wholesalers of men's and women's 
clothing state that sales have fallen 
off, and some houses report the re- 
ceipt of cancellations of orders. Sim- 
ilar conditions prevail in footwear. 
On the other hand, hardware, electri- 
cal and plumbing specialties, glass, 
cement, paints, oils, wallpaper. i'um 
ber, bricks, and all kinds of buii'ding 
material are in good request. 

Boston — There has been no im- 
provement in the commercial and in- 
dustrial situation, as a whole. Mills 
and factories, in most instances, are 
running part time or are entirely 
shut down. Business at wholesale 
and retail is of moderate volume. 

Buffalo — Retail trade is reported 
in fair volume, and a general mark- 
down in prices of wearing atfparel 
continues. Wholesale buyers continue 
to show considerable hesitancy in 
pi'aciug orders for future delivery, 
p.ltho trade, o:i the whole, is reported 
fair. 

Omaha — Retailers thruout this sec- 
tion report much better sales of sum. 
mer goods, due to favorable weather, 
and wholesalers note an increasing 
attendance of visiting buyers. 

St. Paul — Merchants are buying 
cautiously, and general business is 
somewhat below that of this period 
last year. 

Los Angeles — Retail trade condi- 
tions have been marked by uncer- 
tainty for some time past, particular, 
ly as- lelates to luxuries and articles 
of apparel for both men and women. 

San Francisco — General' conditions 
have not shown a great deal of im- 
provement. The tightening of the 
money market has quite seriously af- 
fected various blanches of trade. In 
automobile circles, it is stated that 
there are more automobiles in ware- 
houses than in many months. Inabil- 
ity on the part of dealers to float 
automobile paper has prevented the 
release of cars from warehouses. 



Locke 

Gentleness is far more successful 

in all its enterprizesthan violence — 

indeed violence generally frustrates 

its own purpose, while gentleness 
scarcely ever fails. 



" Give till it hurts" 
Grown ups may learn something 
from little Johnnie. On the morning 
of his birthday this notice was found 
pasted on the door of his room: 

"Remember my birthday; give till 
it hurts." 



Not in the Race 

.Belle — I wouldn't many the best 
man on earth. 

Nell — Of course, you wouidn' t 
Somebody else long ago beat you to it. 

An Enthusiast 
"Cleanliness can be carried to far." 
"Impossible." NNN 

"It can. If I don't stop her my wife 
would scour the lettuce with soap." 



Think of Others 

When on the slippery street you set 
Your feet and get a twist, 

Think of what fun the others get; 
Just be an altruist. 



An Agreement 
"The court gave the convicted ras- 
cal a suspended sentence." 

So did the mob. They lynched him. 



Had His Doubt 

The Counsellor — What, you broke 
after having a hand in that big box 
job? I thought you fellows had a 
gentlemen's agreement to share the 
loot. 

The Yegg — We had. But I suspect 
some of the parties to it were not 
gentlemen. 



♦ HMM I MHH II Mi » ' ,». 

The Sun May Be Shining Bright 




to-day and to-niirrow the 
worst scorin in years may 
break. It's the same with 
the fire situation. You never 
can tell when the devouring 
element may devour your 
property and cause you irre- 
parable loss. There is only 
one sure protection — a policy 
of fire insurance in such 
strong companies lis we rep- 
resent. If you aije not pro- 
tected, see us without delay. 
Don't let another night pass 
unless you are covered. 



Lawrence Mtg. Co. 



215 Main Ave. N. 



Phone 443 



" ' ♦ « 1 »♦, M M f 



NEWSPAPERS 

We will pay for a short time 

40c per Hundred 

for your old Newspapers, folded and bundled, also 

70c per Hundred 

for sour old magazines. We will call for anything you are 
unable to bring to tbe office 

Thief River Hide & Fur Company 



EMPIRE FARMS CO. 

Capital $25,000 

Lands Loans City Property Insurance 

Bring your business to us. 

We Promise courtesy and efficiency 

215 Main Ave. N. 

'Phone 443 

Thief River Palls, Minnesota 



+♦ M t I M M » « M. » » t \ n 

Look At It in Any Way 



PERSONALS 

Miss Olga Strand left for Badger 
Saturday where she will visit for an 1 
indefinite time with friends and rel- 
atives. 

Joe Geizer and daughters, Laura 
and Virginia, left for Greenbush 
where they will visit for a couple of 
weeks before returning to their home 
at Sask., Canada. 

Semi'ey Giefer left for Lancaster 
Saturday "where he will attend to 
matters of business. 

Miss Mathilda Marck, who has 
been employed at Fargo, arrived here 
Saturday and spent the fourth at her 
parental home. 

Joe Wallen left for his home at 
Crookston Friday, after visiting with 
friends here for a few days. . 



Intelligence 

Doctor— Did you give the patient 
the insomnia medicine I ordered? 

Amatenr Nurse^ — Yes, doctor.but 
he got so mad whenever I wpke him 
up to give it to him, 1 



Hemstitching 
MRS. McKINNEY 

Scandia Block 

'Phone 252 

Hours 1 to 12; 1 to 5 



Latest Patterns 
in Silverware 



We have just received a new 
shipment of Silverware in the^ 
famous Alvin pattern,^ the 
best and highest grade silver- 
ware on the market. 
Come in andjlook these pat- 
terns over. They are priced 
right 



A. A. Wairgenstein 

Jeweler 
Across If rom Evelyn Hotel 




our milk is the very best you 
can use iu your household. 
First, because of its absolute 
purity and .sanitary cleanli- 
ness. Next because of its 
superior richness and there- 
fore in nourishing quality. 
Finally because in spite of 
its admitted superority in 
every way it will cost you 
no more to use it. Why not 
at least, : then, sjive it a 
trial: 



Thief River Co-Operative Creamery 
Associaion 

THIEF RIVER FALLS, MI^N. 



ItllH IIIII HHH I HHHMHHHHIHHMIIHIII ) » +^ 



It. Is Just as 

DANGEROUS 

to be without adequate Tornedo insurance as it is 
fire insurance. In the majority of cases fire losses 
are not total but when a tornado strikes, it means 
a total loss to everything in its path. 

We have on display in our bank actual kodak 
pictures of the Fergus Falls tornado of last year 
which shows clearly the enormous destruction of 
property in that town. 

Rates Extremely Nominal as follows: 
Dwellinf houses and contents $4 per $1,000 for 3 rears 
Mercantile buildings and contents SS per $1,000 for 3 years 

First National Bank 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 
Resources Over One Million Dollars 



M^M^^ 



mmtuxzm?''- wk'.evf.'' m^Ms. 






DEFECTIVE PAGE 



.!.._„.__, 



Page Eight 



www- T 5FWi?&i^ 



^W^^^^^^&i^^^^^ ^^-'Pt^^g^^^^^s^^^r.'iy S H a- 




THE TRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JULY 9, 1930 



THE LYCEUM 

SATURDAY 

Mildred Traverse 



in 



'What Would You Do' 

KEYSTONE COMEDY 
Matinee 2:30 



Sunday and Monday 
WALLACE REID in 

'Excuse My Dust' 

From the Saturday Evening Post Story "The 
Bear Trap" 

Beats any Reid Pictures you have seen, 
Special Sennett Com ;dy 

"His Last False Step" 

Matinee Sunday 2:30 
A Paramount T Artcraft Special 



Register' of Deeds tt[.', L Bppk' 13 of 
Mortgages on page ~4J5^in be fore- 
closed.by > s,ale. ofl'th'e' premises in 
sai4 -mortgage^ and. in "Ijhis jfqtlce de-" 
sqribed, at-tn'i SherM's office in the 
6bv^:JaQmie!.*in,"J'ttier'iaty;:"of Thief 
River; Fafisi, ijuthe County, of Pen- 
nington - anil 'State, of ' Minnesota, at 
10 00 o'clock in |he forenoon of the 
30th .day of: July, '1920, to satisfy 
the amount, then due on said.mort; 
gage -together.,.'wifh .Fifty. Dollars 
($50.00)' as. attorney's, tegs, and the 
costs of this, foreclosure, as stipulat- 
ed in.said mortgage. . 

That the, -binds described in said 
mortgage and which will be sold are : 
Lot One (1), Two (2) and Three (3) 
in Block Twenty-Two (22) of the 
Original Townsite of Thief River 
Falls, according to the plat thereof 
on file and of record in the office of 
the Register of Deeds in and for the 
County of Pennington and State of 
Minnesota ; 

That pursuant to a provision in 
said mortgage to that effect, the said 
mortgagee has elected to declare and 
does hereby declare the balance of 
the whole sum secured by said mort- 
gage ftnmediately due and payable 
on account of default having occurred 
in the payment of interest due on 
January 15th, 1920. 

That there now is due the sum of 
Seven Hundred Thirty and 71-100 
Dollars ($730.71) on said mortgage. 
James H. Eustice 

Mortgagee. 
Dated June 2nd, 1920. 
J. J. Truax, 

Attorney for the Mortgagee 
843-45 Plymouth Building, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
J 8-15-22-29 July 6-13 





(Patented) 



| Keystone Silos Stand Winter's Supreme Test 

BETTER YOUR FARM— SAVE YOUR WASTE— BUILD A SILO THIS YEAR 



Tuesday and Wednesday 

MARY PIGKFORD in 

"THE HOODLUM" 

Unquestionably her Greatest Character Role. The 

picture of a thousand laughs! If you miss this 

: picture do not blame us. 

Matinee Wednesday 




AUCTION 

At the old Eastman farm, 

Sec. 4, Town of Sanders,, 7 

miles west of Thief River 

Falls 

Wed. July 14 

i A1ARE s YEARS OLD 
i MARE THREE* YEARS OLD 
1 HORSES 10 YEARS OLD 

4 CALVES 

5 COWS . 
5 GAL. CREAM CAN ! 

I RUMLEY CREAM SEPARATOR 

-I GRINDSTONE 

i THREE - BURNER GASOLINE 

STOVE ' 

i GAS LAMP ' 
i ONE-HORSE CULTIVATOR 
25 CHICKENS | ! 

i WAGON and; hay rack 

. 2 LONG BACKED BUGGIES 
i DELIVERY WAGON 



Stock 

Reducing 

Sale 



To make room for fall and winter 
goods which are beginning to arrive, 
and to av >id loss in handling unpack- 
when we move to our new 
his .month, we are placing 
many articles on sale at prices less 
than they! can be bought for today in 

T 

Lairds 




FILLING HOLE 

Large size; — galvanized frame — 
ihinged. Place where wanted. . 
Heavy, rilfbjed wire g'.ass cover, 
-admits light-. No broken giass can 
• fall into feed. 
MORTARLESS JOINTS 

No mortar joints in a Keystone 
silo. 

Joints are sealed with cement wash 
after wad is builb. 
THREE WALLS IN A KEYSTONE 
Outside Skin — waterproofed ce- 
ment wash. ' 

Concrete Block— containing steel 
reinforcing. 

Inside Skin — waterproof .cement 
wash. 

This makes a dry wall and a 
warm wall becuse it's dry. 
THREE INCHES THICK 
Thick enoug' for strength. 
Thin enough that wail will warm 
quickly when the sun shines in 
cold weather. 
• Bottom of pit level with top of 
foundation leaves silo wail from 
bottom to top without projections 
to interfere wilu silage settling 
uniformly. 
3 to i CONCRETE I 

Keystone Blocks are made of 3 
parts of clean sand and gravel and 
1 pari] Portland cement. 
Always factory made and cured. 




HOOP, STRENGTH— REINFORCING 

3-8 in: steel rods, bedded in con- 
crete, circle this silo from bottom 
to top. 

These hoops are seven inches a- 
part. 

Proper hoops strength means a 
successful silo. 

THE STEEL EAFTERS . 

One each two feet carry the weight 
of this concrete roof and reinforce 
it. 

Fire — Wind — Battle Proof — Per- 
manent. Keeps outf cold — retains 
.natural silage heat. 
DOOR SYSTEAI 

PRIDE OF THE KEYSTONE SILO 
Each door a unit. Hinge and 
ladder combined. 
Locks open automatically. 
Refrigerator type seal. 2-piy Red- 
wood doors — paper insulated. 
Redwood resists Are and rot. 
Single siniple lock, 'impossible to 
accidentally lock yorself in. 

J>\ STEEL RODS PROTECTED 

,3y All reinforcing is buried in concrete. 
A Keystone silo is buiit like ''Sky- 
scrapers" ' and large concrete 
bridges. 

- Hoop style reinforciiiir of steel 
are bolted securely to the heavy 
cast iron door frame. 
1'onr hoops fasten to each door 
frame casting. 
Strength where, strength should be. 



% 



■^ 



MaryTickford in 
"O.Ke Hoodlum 



At the Lyceum Tuesday and Wed- 
nesday. 



CONCRETE AND STEEL from TOP to BOTTOM 

We Build. Them Complete on Your Farm 
BUILT TO SAVE THE CROP THAT NEVER FAILS - 

RAMBECR-STONE CO. 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



many cases. 



Specialty 
Shop 

.3rd Door West of Post Office 



2 SETS WORK 



Usua 



Frank 



HARNESS 



Terms 



Mousley 



Owner 



W. |J LaBree, Auctioneer 
'Farmers and Merchants State Bank, 
Oierk I ; 




DR. SPOFFORD 
Optometrist 
Will be at Hotel Evelyn, Thief 
River Falls, Tuesday, July 1 3th. 
Afternoon only. 



WANT ADS 



..Tribune Want Ads Get Results... 



NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORE- 
CLOSURE SALE 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
certain mortgage made by 
Kbkesh and Mae E. Ko 
i wife, as mortgagors, to 
Eustice, as ^mortgagee, to 
e payment of the sum of 
undred Seventy Five, Dollars 
($775.o6) dated January 15th, 1919, 
filed f 01 record in the office of the 
Reg'ster of Deeds of Pennington 
County, Minnesota, on the 1st day of 
August, 1919, at 1:00 o'clock P. M., 
and duly recorded in the office of said 



. 1 • 



The Prince ss 
SUNDAY and MONDAY 

* - 

MILDRED HARRIS 
CHAPLIN 



in 



"Polly of The Stortji Country 

i A Paramount Magi 

!a First National Attj-'action 
\ At Your Favorite Tpeatre 



■::M 



&X^&,s^k: ^^isMM &&i^fc|j| 



» 



WANTED -r- ASSISTANT LAUN- 

dress at Physicians hospital. 
STRAYED — CAME TO OUR FARM 
FOR SALE — TWO HEAD GOOD 
work mules, one 5 years old and 
one 7: years old. Good gentle team. 
J. B. Sturre, Kratka route; Thief 
River Falls. 34-1-pd 

on June 22 four red bull calves. 
Owner can have same by paying 
for the expense of keeping, and 
advertising. Sam. Hauseby, Rose- 
Wood, Minn., 2% miles SW of 
Rosewood on the Oeu farm: 
FOR SALE — 15 HEAD CHESTER 
White pigs, six weeks old. Priced 
at $4 each. Ed Tirnm, Thief Riv- 
er Falls. 33-1-pd 
FOR SALE.— MODERN 8 ROOM 
house. 716 LaBree aye. N 31-7pd 
HAVING TAKEN OVER HALSETH 
and Son's Painting Business, we 
are in a position to do first class 
painting and paper-hanging. • All 
work guaranteed. Give us a trial. 
Bakken & Sherstad. Phone 5942 
or 218. 32-2tp 
FOR RENT — A MODERN 7 ROOM 
house. 410 Duluth Ave. N. C. W. 
Vorachek. 
WANTED — A COMPETENT RELI- 
able stenographer. Apply in writ- 
ing at once to Tessum Seed, Grain 
& Supply Co. . 34-1 
WANTED TO BUY — GOOD SEC- 
ond hand baby carriage. Must be 
in good condition. Phone 3301. 34-1 
FOUND— BICYCLE— OWNER MAY 
have same by calling Chief of Po- 
lice. 34-1 
FOR SAL E— SMITH FORM A 
truck — one ton, $100 will take it. 
Also Ford spark plugs. Regular 
price $1.00. This month 59c. Best 
place to buy auto tires and sup- 
plies. Hicks'. 




8ea-Horsea With Prehensile Talis. 
Queerest of queer fishes is the sea- 
horse, Hippocampus, often seen In 
aquaria, which hangs itself from or 
supports itself on seaweeds by means 
of a prehensile tail, which mores dor- 
soventrally, not laterally, as in other 
fishes. It has a rapidly vibrating un- 
paired fin on Its back, and the pecu- 
liarity of rolling its large eyes inde- 
pendently of one tmotter. Now, it la 
curious that the tar-removed chamele- 
on, which Is a quaint arboreal lizard, 
should show, the same sort of prehert; 
■lie tall as the sea-horse, only more 
so,; and the same independent rolling 
of the eyes.— New York World. 



WM 



Sedan Convenience 
at Low Cost 



Orerland Sedan Averages 27.6 Miles Per 
Gallon in Los-Anfiles-Yosemite Run 



THE OVERLAND SEDAN is proving to owners 
everywhere the advantages of closed-car summer 
motoring. A permanent top keeps off sun and rain; 
plate glass windows shut out wind and dust. And 
now the 355 mile Los Angeles-Yosejnite Economy 
Run shows remarkable fuel average of 27.6 miles 
per gallon — a striking endorsement of this Sedan's 
economy and the riding qualities of Triplex Springs. 



S 



/Northwestern Auto Co. 



K. A. Sundahl, Prop. 







c 



HARD W ORK W% 
THREE WEEK M 



"ita 



1 :;J? 

CAN; WIN AUTOA10BILE 
THREE WEEKSi: WORK 
TRIBUNE'S PRIZE RACE 



Si 



FOR 
IN 



Local 
to be ii 
meeting 
evening 
plans (< r 
annual licnic 
will be 



A 



WORK!! 

That is the soundest' advice that 
•cantbe given to you,; right now, for, 
the conduct of you I campaign fori 
votes, in The Tribune's great $3,600 
automobile campaign. \ Work! Work! 
all the time. | 

Go after subscription^ with are- 1 
:".• newed vigor — with ■'■ renewed and j 
strengthened energy— f-with increased I 
vigor and more determination. Don't | 
let- atg-thing get by j^ou-i— don't let a j 
single subscription! escape you. Sim- j 
jn'y — work!! | 

The First Period is over — and with 
it subscriptions haVe 'decreased enor- 
mously in value. I From now to the 
close subscription;) will' entitle con- 
testants to just one half the amount 
of rptes hitherto! awarded. And — 
there will' be no increases. It would 
not be fair to the! contestants, now, 
to make increases; or special offers— 
and the poliy of The IMbuiio, thru- 
out this greatest 'of ali great prize 
campaigns is absolute fairness, all 
the time. Your w6rk will entitle you 
to the same amount of votes as at 
the elo-^e — there will! be no last- 
minute spe.eiai offers or sudden and 
unexpected and unheralded increases. 
Therefore — nowj is! the time to 
work hardest. You have, right now, 
a good territory.! a territory, in 
which you can secure many sub- 
scriptions. This 'territory can win 
for you, if canvassed. at once — or you 
can . lose Vv relying on it. if you wait 
too long to do your best;'work. 

Every contestant reached the end 
of the First Period about convinced 
that he needed fresh territory. Wheth- 
er or not jlrey were right it is for the 
contestants themselves 'to say — but 
it is certain that if you don"t get 
your territory canvassed to the limit 
right now — someone el> - e will!! The 
subscriptions which wait for ym 
taking today won't be there tomorrow 
— they'll be added to the winning to- 
tal of some other worker, more ener- 
getic than your or .more lucky. 

You've got to do. your hardest work 
now. The next three weeks, mean the 
world to you — mean success, totai 
and wonderful, or failure, total and 
absoi'ute. 'You're at the turning 
point of the race— at the most' cru- 
cial stage of the whole great drive for 
votes and prizes, j From now to the 
end you can accumulate such a large 
-_ .total of votes as i to win without 
question— or you uin fall behind so 
far as' to make victory out of the 
question. 

Which shall it be? 
The decision rests with you — 
your 'work and your application and 
effort for the next- three weeks, will 
decide the victory for you. In jus- 
tice to yourself and to those depend- 
ent on you — -you've got ito win!! and 
— there's only one way for you to 
.. do so. That is — )>y doiiig your hard- 
. est work from now to the end. 

Go out after subscriptions with ail 
your might!! Pity 1 : up ! the hardest 
. tight of which youl ave capable — 
keep going all the tim? — don't flag 
or hesitate. Don't allow yourself to 
become discouraged— don't let any- 
one persuade you that, the race -is 

■ unfair or not just to you. The Tri- 
bune guarantees that this race will 
be absolutely fair! Behind every 
promise made you stands i the word 
of The Tribune and the representative 

. business men in the! organization of 
that publication, j With such an as- 
surance of fairness and integrity — 

■ with your own knbwedge of the won- 
derful prizes to be awarded and the 

— ^ fact that you can htriii anyone of 

them that you happen to want — you 

know what the race means to you. : . 

Go ahead and win, by doing your 

. *■ • nest work now — win the Buiek 

"Six", the finest automobile made— 

-win the prize you seek and win it 

without one cent of cost to yourself. 

Work! work! work! — and win! 



Elks are notified, 
attendance at a 
to be held Friday 
of this week when 
the holding of the 
of the Kills 
discussed.- It is de- 
sired th it every member who 
can poisihte do so plan to 
attend this meeting anil lend 
what suggestions he- ma.v 
have fof" the big picnic. It 
is thought the picnic will 
be held the latter part of- 
August ana it is for the pur- 
pose of deciding the date 
and the. ij ace for the picnic 
that th s meeting is called. 
Thos? who may have any 
this big picnic are 
requested to be at the meet- 
ing Frilay evening and let 
of the members hear 
. Do not wait until 
after the picnic has been held 
and thqn come forth with a 
of suggestions, 
the meeting Friday 



ideas f< 



the rest 
of then 



number 
Be a 
evenin 



ORS 



T- 



Locals Show Pep 



LOCAL NINE WINS FROM VISIT- 



BY A SCORE 
13 TO 4 



OF 



to, 4. ... 

(hum is supposed to have 

iaVy eVevcij ball 



' The loca ball team took the Ra 
ilium team into camp in this city 
Sunday afternoon by a score of 13 
In \jiew of the fact that Ra- 
iiii espec- 
team and as it was 
reported tliat the- majority of their 
aggregation wore salaried players, it 
was the expectation of the locai fans 
to see a lmt-.y contested game, but 
the. case wi|h which the locals walked 
thru the 'visitors \vi\x so: brisk as to 
lose its edge. 

The Radium team did their very 
best ail the time, however, and not 
for one minute did they attempt to 
lay down/They played the game hard 
from the .start to the finish but by 
being out-eassod and piaying in con- 
siderate h ml luck, they were easily 
defeated t ml She oulfepmte of the 
game couU; be seen after the -second 
inning. 

The local players showed unusual 
ability in lading the ball at will and 
they certainly were nob backward 
when it c; me to slugging out hits. 
The pitchei for the Radium team was 
clever in lis work but he. could not 
find the nimber of the locals and as 
fast as th'rytsnw tit they smmmed 
out clean 1 its right and' left. 

Home ex ra fine field work on the 
part, of th > locals hei'ped in holding 
the score >f the visitors down, but 
the pitching of Biazil and George 
also had hem guessing and their 
inability t) locate the haU at the 
critical* tine, helped 'lose the game. 
They were indeed fortunate in get- 
ting as niJ ny as four runs, and if it 
had not b ten the will of the locals, 
;it is doubt 'ul if they would have 
scored at n'l. 

' The gai le was we'd attended and 
was inten sting to a certain point. 
In the be? inning it looked as-tho it 
might tun. "out to be an interesting 
session, bit i he ease with which the 
local team waded thru ai* 1 difficulties 
left no d( ubt in the minds of the 



MILLION DOLLAR 

A fine rain ftvl in this 
vicinity Sunday and Monday 
and was welcomed by all. 
The crops were just at the 
right stage for a good gentle 
rain and the arrival of .the 
rain could not have been 
more tinieVy had it been or- 
dered. 

The general crop outlook 
is excellent and the best 
crops in years are predicted. 
Small grain was never in 
better shape and the stand 
is ali that could be asked for. 
.Potatoes and all garden truck 
is extra, fine and with an 
abundant .yield from every 
smiree it now Vooks as. if 
Pennington was going to 
forge far in the lead this 
year. Everything points to 
a bumper crop and condi- 
tions generaVly are exception- 
ally pi'easiug. 



FINE SHOWS 
AND MIGHTY 
GOOD EXHIBITS 



THIS YEAR'S FAIR HAS ALL THE 

FEATURES NECESSARY TO 

A HUAIMER 



Boosters Coming 



ST. PAUL BOOSTERS C0A11NG 

BY SPECIAL TRAIN 

JULY 31ST 



CROP OUTLOOK 
EXCEEDINGLY 
ENCOURAGING 



spectators 



ball and 
nentsl 



SUGAR BEET CROPS ARE LOOK- 
ING GOOD AS WELL AS ALL 
OTHERS 



The sugar beets on the Barzen 
farm, west across the track on First 
street are a sight worth vcoing. 
Drive out or walk out and 100k (hem 
over. "We have right here .in this 
field the evidence^ of something good 



DATE FOR 
BIG BAND IS 
DRAWING NEAR 



WILL GIVE OPEN AIR CONCERT 

IN THIS. CITY ON JULY 

2 1st 



The nt her attractions r'.iai 
trip will be condu.-ted under, b(l( , M 1>(mkei i ;m . a - Si) .„ l: , i , ll!( , 11 , , 

lean and attractive. TIk* 'tlyii;^ < i 
s reported to he one 01* :!ii> l.i-.; ii 



About one hundred of the leadin 
wholesale merchants and manufac- j ni . l( . ne ^ "them ton 
turers of Saint Paul will visit Thief 
River Falls on Saturday. July HI ar- 
riving at 7:4n a. m. and remaining 
for one hour and 45 minnres. 

The 
the direction of the Saint Paul A: 
ciation of Public and Business af- 
fairs lo which all the important job- 
bers and manufacturers of the city 
belong. 

These excursions have become a 
regular feature of the work of the 
Association's Sub-division of Jobbing 
and Manufacturing and affords an 
opportunity for thu business men of 
Saint Paul to meet the busine-s men 
of other cities of the northwest. 

Territory covered will be by spe- 
cial train over the lines of- the Soo 
road going from St. Paul to (Jlen- 
••~Swood; from Glenwood to Oakes: from 
Graydon Lower, Euphonium soloist Oakes to Valley City: from Valley 



The date for the Pennington comity 
fair draws nearer and with each suc- 
ceeding day some new and special 
attraction is booked, assuring patrons 
of a high class fair and a round- of 
real enjoyment and amusement. 

The Little Giant ^how<. winch are 
booked for the three days of the fair, 
are held by aU who have witnessed 
their attractions to be a clean and 
pV^'sing attraction, equal to "any- 
thing that has so far been :;iveu in 
this city. The company carry a 
merry-go-round, ferris wheel and an 
airpfaue carosual. They are at pres- 
ent playing the grain beit of North 
! Dakota and are giving entire satis- 
: faction at all pouts. They have a 
I number of high c'ass shows in con- 
j nection with their outside amuse- 
ments and the fair hoard haw been 
assured that nothing bur ccan and 
high class attractions will appear on 
tile f.ocai grounds. There will be no 
"forty-niner's" or anything even re- 
sembling such, dud the fair board 
i announce that where any romphuut. 
ing any of the 
shows that same will be c o<ed down 
immediately and not al.'mwd to con- 
tinue. 



have 
10 he 
1 in us 



ad- 



luers of tul fairs this year and it. is 
felt that it wiil make an in<i:i!ii hit 
in this city. The aerial >unt- of 
Lieut. 'Lara bee are well" adverti^'d all 
over the couiury and from all reports. 



■d 1 



in store for the country and town. { 
Sugar beets are highly profitable, j 
the ground 15 very materially bene- j 
fitted by the cultivation of the crop. 
Sugar beets make sugar, and sugar 
brings money as we know. The great 
majority of sugar beets are raised 
on $400, $500 and ?S00 per acre 
land. Our land is as good for sugar 
beets as the best. When we raise 
the beets in sufficient quantity we 



j with Harc'd Bachman's "Million Do't- 
j lar Band", will" appear in Thief River 
j .KaUi^im. the 21st of J\£.y, on his sec- 
! ond season with that organization. 
j During the war Mr. Lowilen was 
Veader of a cavalry ■ band which 



achieved considerable reputation; He 
was recognized as one of the finest 
euphonium p'ayers in the army ser- 
vice. Mr. Lower was one. of the hits 
of the season with the "Million Dol- 
Var Band'' last season and comes 
; back to the organization this summer 
j after a successful", season in Illinois 
i and Iowa as a director of a 12-piece 
1 concert orchestra under his own 
i name. In addition to his work with 
will get a million dollar factory right; tne . lu . aj;s sextette and quartette that 
here in Thief River Fails. Mr. Bar- Mr - Bnehmnn j s featuring this sum- 
zen is helping us to realize this pros- , mi , r Ml . Lowpr win 1(e huar( , mr this 
peer.- Go out and see the beets. Itj swoe j est !ono(1 of ]U i |, anrt in?tru . 
wia be an^ inspiration and will make j monts in sevornl of the standard 

sdos.for the euphonium. 



gooil old 



that when they so desired 



the Thief .iUver team coui'd play real 



vere mighty- tough oppo- 



JUNE TERM OF 
DISTRICT COURT 
COMESTO CLOSE 



SHORT B JT ACTIVE TERM COMES 

TO CLOSE LAST FRIDAY 

AFTERNOON 



Formef Pastor Critically III 
Hev. Claire E. Boyden, former 
pastor of the Presbyterian church at 
this pi'ace, but who now resides at 
Eden Prairie, Minn.,- is critically ill 
at! his. home with cancer of the 
stomach and no hope is held .out for 
his recovery. He was pastor of the 
ioial church for many years and is 
well known to the citizens generally. 
Itov. Boyden is a man held in the 
■highest esteem by ail who know him 
nnd his iKness will be learned of wjth 
great regret by his many acquaint- 
ances at this place. \ 



At St. Paul on Business 

Scott Laird was called to St. Paul 
Sunday evening to consult with the 
board of relief, in connection with the 
flood sufferers of northern Minne- 
sota. Mr. Laird' says the work in 
this connection is progressing ■ most 
favorably and he rather expects to 
sec the entire matter fuily adjusted 
to the satisfaction of nil In a short 
timd. 

I • . ! ■• I ■:■ 



m£& 



you a real booster for t lie 
home town and county. 

If you want to see something beau- 
tiful and grand drive out lo Mi 1 . 
Kettleson's farm and see his ..]n'endid 
crop of sweet clover on the SKi.'t of 
IS Sanders township, two miles south 
one mile west and one mu'l' mile' 
south. He has 4u acres of sweet 
clover, snrap of it is seven feet 1. it'll, 
an excellent crop. • It looks lil.e ten 
bushels to tlie acre, and this -means 
more than $200 per acre wliirh n:eans 
.$9,000 for the seed on ■!•"> acres. 
Some crop.- Every business man in 
.Thief River Fall's should S'jc this 
crop. 



The June term of the district court, 
Judge Anlrew Grindeland presiding, 
closed las; Friday afternoon after 
short but active session. The iast 
case to come for hearing and the last 
cue decid id was the divorce case of 
Mrs. Mau ice GiUer. The judge grant- 
ed a deer ;e for divorce in about ten 
minutes yesterday morning. 

The &r it case on the docket, that 
of the P; line & Nixon company 
Olaf Nese t was dismissed. The case 
of A. G. Vnderson and Frans Ander- 
son vs J. W. Denhart and" Esther 
Denhart villi be tried later. In the 
case of F irstnau and Christie .vs Hal- 
vorson, tie Prichnrd Co., et al, the 
case was continued and wili come 
up for h<arlng at a.- later, date. The 
cases pf r. J. Dudley vs the Reserve 
■life insuiance company was settled 
out of co irt, as ai'so was the cases, of 
O. A. W :stin, Frank Monsely, et al 
vs Conso idated School District Np.8. 
C. Gusta son & Son vs Singer Bros^ 
and Tral ■ Lumber and * Hardware 
Company vs John . and Emma T 
Homme. 



'■ Visiting at Lawrence Home 
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Lawrence, oi 
Doi'and, S. D., arrived last Friday for 
a few weeks visit at the home of 
their son, L. H. Lawrence.. They 
were accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Lawrence, also of Doland, 
While here they wi?;- visit the Lake 
of the Woods, try out some of the 
fisliing spots adjacent to this city and 
enjoy themselves generally. Both 
these gentlemen are retired farmers 
and extensive land owners. 



As a special attraction with Ids 
Million Dollar Hand, Mr. Bnehmnn is 
j pi'csentinir a very taVented violin 
: soloist, Mr. En'ing Sodahl. of Duliith. 
I Mr. Sodahl has studied with' the finest 
; teachers in the northwest and comes 
i to the Baclnnan band from Du'uth 
! with the highest recommendations 
! from (lie press and critics of that 
i city. Sodalil's repertoire consists of 
the more "popular of the violin classics' 
i Some of his lu^coiiHianlments arc 
1 played by Wn'.ter F. Klingmaii. of 
i Louisville, Ky.." at the piano, and 
' some are played by the band. Mr. 
Bachmau says that the most difficult 
thing his band has to do is to p!ay 
accompaniments for the violin solos 
and it is this class of work that the 
real art of his organization is best 
displayed; 

Mr Sodahl is also a splendid pian- 
ist and a saxaphone soloist. He was 
featured in special saxaphone num- 
bers with the "Million Doiar Band" 
at the Palace Music Hall's in Chicago 
'iast year. 



City to'Minot; from Minot to Keu- 
niarc and Portal : anil from Thief 
River Falls lo Detroit. - 

The Trade tour will occupy the 
entire week of July liiitli. being made 
hy special train of eleven cars in- 
cluding sleeping and diniir.,' ear- so 
that the entire party can live on the 
train during the week. 

The Minnesota State ' hand of 
twenty-live pieces will aerumpuny 
the party and concerts will lie given 
in each town in which the train 
stops. Tiie feature of the visit will 
be tlie parade of the entire party thru 
tile main streets of the city imme- 
diately upon their arrival. Numer- 
ous souvenirs will be distributed to 
tile children. 

The object of. these trips is that 
the wholesalers 'and manufacturers 
may have an opportuniy to personally 
meet their friends and customers in 
the towns visited, see their pVaee- of 
business and acquaint themselves 
witli bu-iness conditions in the var- 
ious cities and towns visited. 

The special train schedule. h:is been 
aiiproved by the opcr.nin:: ilej'art- 
nients, of the various r.-iiiroads ami it 
is expected that schedule will be 
maintained. 



lie has been giving sonic 
wonderful exhibitions. I>r< 
the plane in a parachute 
5.000 feel ill mid air i- 
novel stunts and in addle 
ai. over the pl.-ine while i 
the air. This is enlcii 
ot* the miKt liariug ami in 
acts possible for :iuy t'nir I- 
^ar.ire or suniil. 'I'lu- i-oininu' 
two high class attiaetions 
nectiofi with the ninny o In-:- 
lions ,-iiiii free acts lluit ha 
booked, arc ceriaiii to jiul: i 
e-l cr.,\\-,i ill > I'm ■ li:t — seen I 



nighty :iml 
jipin,' t'loin 
\v!i? e ii is 
oIm- of liist 

II lie \v:i!kS 

i- !ii:r[i in 
be one 
re-ting 
si-i-i;re, 



1 I! 



Ml 



on- 



eu 



allr.l 
,-e 1). 
ie l.irg- 
•r in 



n y 



ear-. 
The 



(hi 



exhil.i 
s I'm- 



cilii 



iisll-in 

ori-iiin 
shape and tlio-, 
feature of ilie fair ci.nt 
tills lo Ije Ihe -lellar 
the* f.-tir. Kx'iiliil-'froii 
of tile i-ollllly lire" expi 
the de-ire 1 of llio-e ii 
elilrys be made a- e;ll 
ill ord-'i- lluit same 
displaycM ami every 
ncss for Ihe opeliin 
Tu'enly !o,-;»; mere 

lieil llieir wi!lill-_'lie-- I., in 
in the auililoritiui fie- ihe 
and it is t-ertain soon- n 
tractive booth- will b«- (h 
i- ;li-o given our. licit 11 
several d'-inon-traior- fn 



I.- h-M 



l-i. t:y 
alirio- 



may In 
hiliL- b. 



- lo 



11 IS 

that 

"ill'O 

■1'ori'y 
r.-adi- 
f.iir. 
-iu'tii- 
i-i.ihs 
"davs 



wil! In 
rie- 



l:i 



le 



the 



Married Monday 

Melvin Olson and Miss Neilie G. 
Sholes were wedded on Monday the 
twd'fth instant at the Presbyterian 
manse. Rev. R. L. Barackman offici- 
ating. The bond was sealed by giv 
ing and receiving the wedding ring.- 
The bride had chosen to be married 
in georgette'' over biue satin. Mr. 
Olson is manager of the co-operative 
r store at Salol, where' the young peo- 
pje will make their home after a short 
trip. Their many friends in this 
city and elsewhere wish them a 
prosperous experience. 

— — \— 

Visiting at Johnson Home 

Mrs. J. G. Holty and hii'dren' of St. 
Lonis, Mo., arrived the latter part-of 
last week for a visit at the home of 
her sister^ Mrs. Albert Johnson. They 
wild remain the greater part of the 
summer., Mrs, Holty was met at Min- 
neapolis by Mrs. Johnson. 



Here From South Dakota 

E. Biankenburg of Henry, South 
Dakota, is in the city looking after 
his Hand interests. Mr. Biankenburg 
is one of the reliable and substantial 
farmers of his section . and is con- 
sidered one of the big men of South 
Dakota. He says Pennington coun 
ty is fast forging to the front aiid he 
can plainly see that in the course of 
a few years it wijl be up with the 
best of them. He is wed satisfied 
witurhis land interests at this place 
and feels that his investment'in Pen- 
nington county soB was a wise one. 



mill \v!lo:"-;l!e hot]-.-- |, !, --,:;! fi.;- liie 

fair and tl:e inon-limn - of ;h" >-iiy 
are cliiliiii-oriii- to .-i--i:r,- otii--r iloin- 
oii-trator- -o Ihiit .Here wi:; b,. _ a 
irooil sized liniiibt-r o;: |:;ti.,i wle-li tile 
lir-l day arrive-. ■ t 

The fair 'board have deeiibd to 
1^-ave r!n- a'luii--!oti ;.. tin- fair at t!ic 
.-■ame prii-i-. tii'ly eem- I'm;- ,-oin!t- ami 
^."e for i-hil.livn. 'i !i,. a; :ra> tiohs 
for tlii- year are l-iitmiaL' twier a.s 

lli^il as lasi year, but the dii tors 

feel that it wii. be 
admission price the 
hoping that the in< 
will take '-are of 
pense tiiis year. 

Season tickets will be >oiu fir ad 
j three days' of the fair at tile price of 
I S'J. and tlic.-c tickets wid lie good for 
I any member of the family for ail 
j three days and the eveniiu's as well. 
i The day prices of the fair this year 

j will bo as fodows : Adults oOc. 

The young son of Mr. and Mrs. j Children., Soe. Evening prices : Adults 

2i»c, cliii'Srcn 10e. 



CHILD POISONED 
FROM DRINKING : 
WINTERGREEN: 



SMALL SON OF MR. AND AIRS 

CARL ANDERSON HAS CLOSE 

CALL 



liii 
lM-sr I. 
s;iim* ;is l:isr yt>:. 
risi^cil atlciHl.iM 
lii' :i'Miriuii;L o 



New Potatoes 
Cordon Olson was la this morning 
with new potatoes for the market- 
He had In one measure 20 pounds of 
spuds. He sold them for $2.25. The 
potatoes averaged 4 oz. each and were 
very fine indeed. Mr. Olson, as re- 
ported in The Tribune before had 
new potatoes on June 20th. He re- 
prts afl crops just jumping since our 
fine rain last night. . . 



Cad. Anderson,. Tindqiph avenue, is 
seriously ill as the result of drinking 
a portion of oil! of winter^reen lute 
last Friday afternoon. In company 
with some other children he. was 
playing in the home of a neighbor 
and the children were playing dentist 
and using the ofi of wintergreen for 
toothache and then later used it for 
rheumatism. Thinking the medicine 
was good for rubbing on purposes, 
the boy figured out that it should do 
as much good if taken internally and 
as a result he swallowed a large por- 
tion, the exact amount unknown. 

As the. boy is on?y a trifle pasti 
three years of age, it was difficult for 
the attending physician to ascertain 
just how much of the wintergreen 
he had taken and it was feared for 
some time that it would be impossible 
to save his life. As oil of wintergreen, 
when taken in quantities is akin to 
wood alcohol, it is very dangerous j 
and hard to combat, but by persistent 
efforts the lad was saved and is at 
the present time on the road to re- 
covery, / 



Leaves Soon on Vacation 

Rev. R. L. Barackman, pastor of 
the Presbyterian church lias been 
granted a well earned vacation and 
expects to start eariy next week for 
Pennsylvania, his native state. He 
expects to spend some time with 
his aired father, with his sifter wno 
is a niissioriary in Africa and is home 
on furlough, and with other relatives 
and boyhood friends. Krom Penn- 
sylvania the distance is not great to 
New York City where Mr. Barack- 
man's brother Lives on the Jersey 
side. He expects to return in time 
to resume his dut.ie.-j on August 1*2. 
Meanwhii'e the • church auditorium 
will receive some needed repairs. 



Returns From Iowa 
Mrs. Y. i\ Hayues and daughter, 
Esther, and. sister. Miss Cora Toffle*-. 
ineire, returned Saturday from. Mason 
City. Iowa, at which place they havt 
been visiting for the. past three 
weeks. They report au enjoyable visit. 






J-^ 



AI 






:.j-! 



if-' 



^F 



i 



Page Two , 



.....Automobile 



LABOR WINS ALL. "-Tacitus 



This column conducted by Automo- 
bile Campaign Department, The Tri- 
bune. 



■ 



A LITTLE ADVICE 

, tliem that help 
-Benjamin Frank- 



"God hei'pa 
themselves."— 
Hn. 

"Mistakes are -opportunities 
for learning."— Emerson. . 

"Go on and make errors and 
fail and get up ajrain. Oni'y — 
GO- OX!" — Anna <!. Brackett. 

"Be tit godd oom'a^rf 'and 
everlasting energy — that is the 
main thing!" — Thoreai^ 

"Men are born to succeed — 
"SOT to fail!" — Thoreau. ' 

"He that rises again and eon. 
tinues his race has never fall- 
en.'' — Molineaux. i 

"You may fancy that the 
■water ■ will be warmer next 
week. It won't. jltj- will be 
colder. Putting off ja thing is 
merely a step to • increase the 
necessary effort. NOW is the 
time to do the thing which must ■ 
he done." — Arnold; Bennett. 



I Says 
don't tu 

, somehod r 
seek opi 

j portunit/ 



pricm 
thousand: 
on — the 
a lltti'e 
making 
expense 
healthy 
teering 



money 
he; with i 
is buiidijig 
-ture. 



^^.^y ^^^ 




THE TRIBUNE 



TUESDAY, JULY 13, 1920 



Campaign News, 



Daniel Webster: "Things I WILLING to work, when it is abso- 



n up in this world until 
turns them' up." If you 
ortunity— ^don't wait for *op- 
to come to you. WATCH 
FOR YdUR CHANCE— AND THEN- 
TAKE ADVANTAGE OP IT 



WH^T ABOUT YOU 

Mr. a id Mrs. were out 

:-ars the other day. Two 
and so 



three thousands, 

figures left them dazed and 

: Tightened. Mr. is 



ON SAVING TIME 

"Time is worth a great deal more 
than money," says Arnold Bennett in 
his famous essay ou "How >t6 Live-on 
Twenty-Four Hours a Day." "You 
can only waste the passing moment 
— you cannot waste the next hour — 
for it is kept for you. No object is 
served, iu waiting until iiext week or 
even until tomorrow. The gain in 
self-conlidenee which tile perforin, 
ance of hard work gives, is worth all 
the world to you." 

In other words— TIME IS 'MONEY 
— the struggle for success has a real 
value beyond its potential results, in 
that it strengthens you physically 
and morai'ly. t I 

And. .for the thinking man or wo- 
man. thero\a lot of real inspiration 
in this. It's a fact that tomorrow 
never gets to you — that if you keep 
putting o.lT a certain tiling — you'll 
never iIh it. Komeinber when you 
were a iil tie fellow — how you hated 
to get up those. cold winter mornings, 
and lay there comfortably while your 
mother called you again and again — 
and shivered and shuddered at the 
thought .of the bitter! cold floor and 
the colder air — and then how much 
better you felt when you DID get up? 
rutting oK work is criiniuai', worse 
- than criminal. Where today oppor- 
tunity may await yo'ti ou every cor- 
nel- — tomorrow you may find your- 
self beaten before you start. YOU 
CAN'T AFFOKD TO PUT OFF 
A MOMENT T: 

WHICH YOU I'LA.V [TO ACHIEVE 
ULTIMATE SUCCESS ! ! 
' J'ick out the tiling you want to do 
. — concentrate on the kind of effort 
_which wii'l help you the most — and 
then STICK TO IT. It doesn't mat- 
ter how hard the. task, or how long 
the time you must | work — if you 
concentrate and work' with all your 
might, without losing any time— 
YOU'LL GET THERE. Concentra- 
tion is a means of discipline to the 
thinking machine — concentration is 
the only key to success. 

AND — DON'T WASTE YOUR 
TIME— ANY TIME I j! 
* * » * 

Right now. The Tribune is giving 
.voir the opportunity jto win one of 
two wonderful autoniobi.es or one of 
ten large cash prizes] totalling alto- 
gether nearly $4,000; in yaiue — and 
the. only requisite is that YOU CEASE 
TO PUT OFF DOING, HARD WORK. 

The First Period is over— it came 
to a close with, contestants almost 
even, with no one iuj the lead. THE 
DECISION OF THE RACE IS STILL 
TO COME!! From now to the close, 
Saturday night at eight o'clock. July 
.list, it's going to be a continual tight 
land a hard one. all- file time, for 
'winning votes. Every contestant is 
going to work at top s!peed all the 
time— if they wish to- win. And you, 
wishing to win as you do — must do 
likewise. * 

DON'T SLOW UPi OR LAG BE 
HIND! Dou't let the end of the First 
Period induce a temporary slowing 
up of your work which may lose for 
you. KEEP RIGHT ON WORKING. 
Keep right on' trying. MAKE EV- 
ERY DAY AND BV3RY HOUR 
COUNT TO THE UTMOST. Get 
every subscriber, old or 1 ew, that you 
possibly .can. Get every order that' 
can be secured. E|-ery day lost 
means actual money lost. Every 
time that you miss a subscription you 
might have secured, yor. are passing 
up a real and tangible opportunity. 

TIME IS THE MOST VALUABLE 
THING THERE IS-yASD NEVER 
WAS IT MORE SO THAN RIGHT 
NOW! KEEP WORKIN'G!! YOU 
HAVE A GOOD START— YOU 
HAVE A STRONG VOTlS RESERVE 
—YOU ARE WE&Li AMONG THE 
LEADERS — IMPROVE ON YOUR 
.ADVANTAGE Af{D WIN BY DOING 
EVEN HARDER WORK FROM NOW 
TO THE CLOSE. I ; 

"MAKE IT A HOT 6N.E ! !" 



pretty good money — but the 
of keeping a large and 
Family in these days of profi- 
leaves very little money to 
be bank ;d, over and above expenses. 
He is f<rced to put quite a little 
iiack into the business — for 
true foresight and economy, 
-Jg the business for the f u- 
And, because the initial out- 
lay seems too heavy — they've given 
up buyi lg the ear that they have 
wanted j or many years. 
HOW ABOUT YOU? 
• Renienber— you don't need to pay 
for yours,.- save in hard work and 
careful t pplication and determined 
effort. L'our hard work during the 
next twi weeks will win one of two 
fine cars for . you — free of charge. 
WHY NOT WIN THE BUICK 'SIX'? 
You can do it by putting in YOUR 
VERY I EST EFFORT for the bal- 
ance of the campaign. ' 
THE WORKER WINS! 



A FULL DAY'S WORK 

A full day's work — hard, deter- 
mined, earnest, enej'getic — that can 
win almost anything for you. A con- 
stant stream of remittances, obtain- 
ed wherever and whenever possible 
by you— paii win the Bu'ick "Six" for 
you during the next three weeks — 
the last weeks of the compaign. 

And— j-OU'VE GOT TO DO MIGH- 
TY GOOD WORK AND LOTS OF 
IT!! ThJ> next three weeks will see 
the decision of the race — and wheth- 
er it shall be victory or. defeat de- 
pends altogether 0.1 you and your 
work. IF YOU WANT TO WIN — 
INCREASE THE AM'.tU-VT AND 
TIME Oil YOUR WORK. 

It. may sound bard — it may mean 
cutting down your leisure hours sti'rt 
mere or encroaching on those hours 
you have-Bet apart for other pursuits. 
But — it's worth it! A full day's 
I work on tour farm or in your busi- 
I ness means money to you— but a full 
j day of good, clean, honest work for 
I subscriptibns can mean EVEN MORE 
I TO YOU. in The Tribune's great 
i .-?:!. GOO automobile campaign. 
j IT'S VtjOKTH THE TIME 
I TIIKEF f ORT— THE PRIZES OF- | 



lutely necessary, but the man who 
is GLAD to work, and ''who. realizes 
fully that WORK ALONE can win for 
him, 

When you are before your cus- 
tomer, everything you say or do 
should be part of a carefully laid pi'au 
of sale. You shoui'd be prepared to 
put before him the VERY" BEST 
POINTS of your proposition. You 
should be prepared to bring to bear 
upon him EVERY AVAILABLE IN- 
FLUENCE. You should be prepared 
to answer EVERY OBJECTION that 
he may make. 

Remember Andrew Carnegie? "Put 
all your eggs iu one basket. And 
then — watch that basket!!" Car- 
negie knew what he was talking 
about. PUT ALL YOUR ENERGY 
INTO THE WORK OF WINNING- 
SEE THAT YOU FORGE AN OR- 
GANIZATION TO BACK YOU ALSO 
DETERMINED TO PUT YOU OVER 
FOR A WONDERFUL VICTORY— 
AND THEN WATCH YOURSELF 
UNTIL YOU HAVE DONE IT!! 



Concentrate your energy, thought 
and capital exclusively on the busi- 
ness in which you are engaged. — - 
Charles M. Schwab. 

Follow Schwab's precept — turn 
every energy, every advantage, 
ery slight lead, to the one purpose of 
achieving the TOPMOST GOAL — and 
follow up that precept and its appli- 
cation by plain, hard work!! 



WHERE THERE'S A 
WILL 

(Note: This true story of a 
young man's great success, un- 
aided by riches or influence, in 
a campaign exactly similar to' 
that now being conducted by 
The Tribune, and ' written by 
that young man several years 
ago, will appear' in installments 
in this column during the pro- 
gress of The Tribune's great 
?3,000 campaign. READ IT — 
D O N" T MISS IT — IT HAS 
MUCH IN IT FOR YOU.) 
(By Robert Douglas) 



14J, ! V<m FE KED 4.RE WORTH EVERY BIT 

"...;:.,' WITH OF. WORK AND EVERY BIT OF 

TIME THAT YOU CAN POSSIBLY- 
PUT INTO THE RACE. You've the 
opportunity to earn an automobile 
worth eighteen hundred dollars — to 
win a luxurious and high-powered 
automobile free of charge. You've 
the greatest opportunity of your life 
— if you are simply wide-ahvake 
enough t > take advantage of it at 
once, YOIJ'VB GOT TO GO AHEAD 
WITH AlLT, YOUR MIGHT, THO, 
IX ORDER TO WIN. 

Rather increase your efforts than 
decrease hem, during the fast three 
weeks. THE RACE IS NOT YET 
WON OR LOST FOR YOU — you 
can't feel|sure either of victory or of 
defeat. The only way to play safe, 
is to PUTJ IX A FULL DAY'S WORK 
EVERY DAY FOR THE BALANCE 
OF THE pACE. 

WORK YOUR VERY HARDEST 
AND BEST— GET EVERY BIT OF 
GOOD WpRK DONE THAT IS POS- 
SIBLE—MAKE YOUR RACE DE- 
TERMINED AND ENERGETIC AND 
CONSTAST AND BRILLIANT 
AND KEf P IT UP UNTIL YOU 
WIN ! ! 

"MAKE IT A HOT ONE ! ! 



Tribune's 
campaign 
It depend 



July SI st — the greatest day in the 
year for sjome of the workers in The 
great $3,000 automobile 
Will you be one of thein? 
ou you — if you work hard 
and hnrdeV, you will Vead — if you loaf 
along wit] Lout really doing much more 
work, YOU'LL LOSE. It's 
WHAT WILL THE DE- 



IS. Busy Says 




The WORKER wins— always. And 
that mean; hot the. man who is 



I 



4 



Chapter Twelve 

All the next morning I worked 
about the. place. About eleven 
o'clock, Mother came out and called 
me. When I went up. to the house 
she told me that the chicken-house 
was somewhat out of repair — that 
the roof had leaked so badly during 
the 'last storm as to nearly drown the 
hens. So I went to work and put in 
the rest of the day, or until almost 
three o'clock, working on that shed- 
until at last the most critical! observer 
AND ' woul11 uave Dl -' el1 forced to admit, no 
' matter how unbeautifui the shed 
might be from an architectural 
standpoint, it was certainly rain and 
weather-proof. 

When I reached the house, mother 
told me that Jim Button was wait- 
ing for me ou the porch. 

"Say, Bob," he grinned, "I'm going 
down town today with a couple of 
wagons of watermelons — I'm finish- 
ing up the crop. Want to make a 
little money? If you do, come on 
and drive my white team for me, and 
I'll give you a fourth of what your 
wagon-i'oad sets for. Is it a go?" 
"You bet it is!!" 

I didn't give Jim a chance to back 
down On his offer, for I knew how 
much money there might be in it for 
me. 

And so we went over to Jim's 
farm and hitched up the teams. When 
we had reached town, Jim swung 
down the street and stopped the two 
wagons on the corner of Oregon and 
Fourth street — the busiest corner in 
the .'ittle town. Down in our coun- 
try the women-folks do their Sun- 
day's marketing Saturday afternoon, 
down at' the big open market, and 
Jim with his auctioneering type of 
hawking was Just the one to get the 
most out of his products. To each 
woman whom he thought would buy, 
Jim was handing, a huge and juicy 
watermelon, adjuring them the while 
to get theirs while there was stii'i a 
chance. Jim did The talking and I 
did the measuring, making change and 
handing out melons — and between the 
two we made a wonderful success of 
it. At five o'clock, after everything 
was sct*d and Jim was chinking gold 
and silver in his huge pouch in the 
contented fashion • of a dog with a 
new onbe, I left him and started 
home. 

The next morning at eight o'clock 
I started out after subscriptions. I 
was all set for a day of trial and 
tribulation — I didn't have the pep and 
energy that had been mine at the 
start of the race — but I was deter- 
mined to MAKE THE BEST REC- 
ORD POSSIBLE anyhow. 

The first house I came to was that 
of oi'd Angus McLeod — a hard old 
sinner who had all the temper and 
stinginess and none of the kindliness 
of his Scotch ancestors. He's one of 
the hard bargainers in the country 
and one of the richest men — natur- 
ally. . 

He was in the yard in front of the 
big white house in whjch he lives, 
sawing limbs from the elm and 
mapi'e trees in order to make their 
growth more even and regular — the 
fetish of his life was ORDERLINESS. 



. He looked me over with that dour 
disdain and distrust which is the 
birthright of every true Scot, and 
then demanded what I wanted. 

When I toVd him, I honestly fear- 
ed for a moment that he was going 
to shoot me. Honestly, he did every- 
thing but jump up and down aud tear 
his hair — just. because I had tried to 
persuade him to spend a little, mouey 
for something that he didn't think" 
he needed. ' I 

I taVked three-quarters of an hour! 
— working from the point that he 
could save money by taking Thej 
World — a talking point which I've 
found is H'most always effective 
with people of his type. I told him 
that he was losing money every day 
that he paid out his good money for 
a farm paper which came only semi- 
monthly and carried stff'.e news and 
staler market quotations and articles 
— told him how The World would 
give him all the market reports 
WHILE THEY WERE STILL NEW, 
and then told him how cheap it 
realty was. I talked to him confi- 
dentially — pretending to tell - him 
more than I should, as to the cost of 
paper and print'supplies and the un- 
usually severe conditions under which 
The World aud ail other newspapers 
were then laboring. A farmer is al- 
ways ready to talk over the topic of 
high prices — and when I showed 
Angus that prices <ind gone up for 
us just as for him, he was satisfied 
that I was honest and above-board. 
And, when I told him what a shrewd 
man he was — he was sure of.it! 

I went away from there at ten 
o'ei'oek,~ with his subscription for two 
years — and the old Scot stood at. the 
gate to watch me drive away — half 
convinced that I'd put something over 
on him. but not sure enough so as to 
fed', safe in telling me about it. 
(To Be Continued Friday) 



EMPIRE FARMS CO. 

Capital $25,000 

Lauds Loans City Property Insurance 

Bring your business to us. 
We Promise courtesy and efficiency 

215 Main Ave. N. V 
'Phone 443 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



C. M. ADKINS 

Physician and Surgeon 

Office Over First National Bank 



THEO QUALE 

Lawyer / 
Practice in all Courts land B> 
fore O. S. Land Office 
McGinn Building 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 




Shrunken 



Dollars 



W 



HIGHEST CASH PRICES 
.Paid for all Kinds 
of 

LIVE. POULTRY 

at 

DeCremer's Meat 

Market 



bile a dollar wiU not buy as 
much as formerly, it will s ti'.i earn 
5% if left here in a savings account. 



A. Iso — a' day is coming when these 
shrunken dollars will buy twice as 
much as they will buy today — per- 
haps more. 



hen will be the time to SPEND 



them. 



TODAY 
A savin 



is the day to 



omit here was 



never so good an investment as it 
Ls today. Start one NOW. 



Citizens State Bank 




PJ.OYS are well-known. You don't have 
j, J* to go to far lands or to the Co;i:ily Fair 
to look upon them. Everywhere, it is 
still the style to have Boys'. 

Perhaps you are trying to run one or more 
Boys right this minute. Then you v.'iil know 
that since the world began thev were never 
so tremendously important as now. Your 
hopes and your aims center on them! You 
must deliver them out of Boyhood into 
successful Manhood. 

WIU your sons stay with the land, or will 
the will-o-tie-wisp o'f the cities call them 
away? Armies of country Boys, who could 
be happiest and most successful on farms, 
respond to tie artificial glamour of tow 11 life 
before they are old enough to know their 
own minds. They d not i :n0 -.- t ij at tile 
rewards of country life — in money, Health, 
and happiness — are far greater. Make them 
realize that! Guide the restless ambitions 
of your Boys and spare no pains ! 

Machines have been a powerful factor in stem- 
ming the flow to the cities. Machines banish 
drudgery and make labor interesting : machines 
foster the love of mechanics in the Boy ; machines 
are builders of fortunes. 

You now own many of the machines made by 
the International Harvester Company. "We are ' 
headquarters for the International Full Line in- 
cluding Titan tractors, International engines 'and 
manure spreaders, Primrose cream separators, 
McCormickand Deering harvesting, having and 
corn machines, tillage tools, PfcO plows, etc ° Give 
the Boys every chance for liking farming and 
farm life. Perhaps more of these machines will 
help keep them contented. 



^^ "^%iiiiffiiiimi^M 



1 ^ 



'BMfe^WW:', 



r 



G, GUSTAFSON & SON 

Thief River Falls and Grygla, Minnesota 



n*' 



:|0"» 



-V- 



>-■-,-?•? 



TUESDAY, JULY 13', Joao 



; - r "'^ y^K ; A ' ^™-.<^y rt * y ^'C^^.^»^-;^^^ *-^u ■■4y r**wtj.- r ^' l ..-> 



THE TRIBUNE 



Page Three 



FARM WOMEN SHOULD HAVE 
THE MODERN METHODS 



,«v 



■Wasington.j D. C; — The waste of 
■woman power is one of the greatest 
menaces to the rural 'ife of the na- 
tion, according to the deductions that 
specialists of the United States de- 
partment of agrictture. draw from a 
farm-home survey conducted in the 
thiryt-three northern and western 
states. The survey was made under 
the direction of Miss Florence B. 
Ward, in charge of extension work 
with women, office of Extension 
Work, North and West, States Rela- 
tions Service. T"be record covers 10,- 
01S farnubomes, averaged by taking 
typical communities cje the counties 
in which tiie survey! wjis made. Much 
of the information !was gathered 
personally by honie demonstration 
agfents, who are field jrepresentatives 
iA the United States (department of 
agriculture and the! state agriculture 
colleges. j 

Miss Ward points out, from the 
facts shown by t.ie survey, that 
reasonable amount j oil planning and 
well directed investment in modern 
equipment for farm ; homes would 
prevent a large part of this wastage 
ofW energy of the nation's rural 
home makers. "This; is a serioas 
matter," she continues, "because we 
have a live national jiroblem now in 
working out the economics of coun- 
try living in such a \>ay as to make 
them satisfied to stayjon the land and 
help build it up. Perhaps (lie great- 
est factor in briugiiig : this about will 
be the healthy', alejt, and expert 
home maker who wil;,; see to it that 
part of increased production from the 
farm goes into iniprpyeuicnt of the 
home. At a time like) this, when the 
dearth of farm iauoij jis a limiting 
factor in production, j it is a ver 3 
doubtful business poiicy for farmers 
to use increased income to buy more 
laud instead of using a part of it 
in raising, standards of living so that 
women and young : people will not 
want to go to the Icities in search of 
attractive living concitons and am- 
. usement." -- i - ■ 
' Picture Woman's Work Day 

The survey discloses a number of 
reasons why many women do not 
find farm life attractive. The work- 
ing day of the average farm woman 
as shown, by the) survey is 11.3 
hours the year 'round. In summer, 
it is 13.12 hours. Anil 87 out of each 
100 women have 'no regular ' vaea- 
! tion during the year. On the aver- 
age the farm iwoman can find only 
1.6 hours of leisure during the su'm- 
jiner hour* and only 2.4 hours in the 
(winter. Half of the farm women are 
up and at work at 5. o'clock in the 
morning. 

j Forty- per cent. halve water in the 
ikitchen but the other per cent must 
. -jgo. to the. spring! c-r the . pump . to 
bring the water foif cooking break- 
fast. Thirty-six p6r: cent help with 
the milking. • Oh fje average the 
jfarm woman has a sjeven-room house 
to keep in order, i Sixty-nine per 
cent have kerosenij lamps to trim and 
fil(y Ninety-six per Cent do the fam- 
ily washing, about Kalf of them have 
washing- machines ajnl the other hai'f 
'do the work with In)), washboard and 
boiler. Twenty-six per ceut have gns 
5 or electric irons to [make more com- 
fortable the task; on ironing. Ninety- 
\j two per cent do;sone or all of the 
: famii'y sewing. Oai ilen^work is done 
by fifty-six per cent; 'ninety-four per 
cent make ail or! pi rt of the family 
. bread anil sixty per cent have churn - 
igg to do. Eighty- mie per cent of 
Sill poultry flocks ire cared for by 
Women. ■ One-fourtji of the farm wo- 
men help to feed |nd bed the live 
ktoek, and twenty-Sour per cent of 
them spend over #x , weeks in the 
year assisting withisouie part of the 
'field work. Ail of! this in addition 
to cooking the family meats and car- 
ing for the children. 

This, of course, jis the dark side 
of the shield. It (fees not take into 
donsidqratton 'flic jtnany ((onipensa- 
tions that come wjith the woman's 
daily round of worft for the comfort 
of -her famii'y, and'} anyone who has 
experienced the satisfaction of living 
in the open countri- knows that the 
average farm wonntn is lftore fortu- 
nately placed than j her average city 
sister. But tliV task is sufficiently 
grinding, as Miss Ward says, to send 
the farm woman toj bed "breathing a 
i prayer that. her strength may equal 
■ tomorrow's duties."! 

Labor Saving Equipment 
What is to be done about it? The! 
department suggests some very defi- 
nite things. "Tn'e interest of ttie de- 
partment of agriculture in the re- 
turns from these studies as to labor, 
working equipment; and compensa- 
tions of the farm Woman are as prac- 
tical," says Miss jVard, "as its in- 
terest in farm studies regarding ta- 
bor, machinery and crop returns, and 
for the same general reason." The 
farm woman's working hours might 
be shortened, she \ continues, if the 
principles of modern business were 
applied to the far$n home. Running 
■water for sixty-one per cent who 
now have to carryj water, and bath 
rooms for the elgllty per cent who 
now have none, arc other things that 



Legal Publications 



women, in 
of homes 
used. Tl 



would I'iigl; ten' the woman's labor and 
add to her comfort and contentment. 
Labor would be lessened if the farm 
house wei!c as weK equipped as the. 
iip to date barn, which the farmer 
looks upoi as so much currency with 
which to buy efficiency. The instal- 
modefn tlighting systems 
would release some of the time of 
the seventy-nine per Jfent 
where kerosene lamps are 
e Initial cost would be 
small when weighed against the con- 
venience And comfort. The installa- 
tion of heating systems wouid release 
some of the time of the fifty-four 
per cent of women who care for two 
coal or wood stoves. 

"As power oh the farm is- the 
greatest time and labor' savers for 
the farmer,"- Miss Ward's report 
says, "sol power in the house is the 
greatest boon to the h'ousewlle;" 
Forty-eight per cent of farms covered 
by the silrvey reported power for 
operating J farm machinery, but only 
twenty-two per cent have this advan- 
WASTE OF WOMAN POWER Cont. 
tage for the home. "That," says Miss 
Ward, "is a singular fact when we 
consider Ihat frequent.}- it is a. 
simple mptter to connect the engine 
used at the barn with the household 
equipment." The washing machine 
is another l'abbr saver. Selling the 
cream to a creamery whenever possi- 
ble instead of churning it at home 
is still. another. In short, the same 
sort of intelligence and a fraction of 
the mon£y applied to making ficM 
and barra work convenient would, if 
applied to tjie. home, save uuf.old 
dtudgerylto the women of the farms 
and would add both to the profit and 



ST. H1LA1RE 



the comfort of farm .ife. 



WHEA 



notice of Mortgage fore- 
closure sale 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, 
That a certain mortgage made by 
Joseph E. Kokesh and Mae R. Koi- 
kesh, his wife, as mortgagors, to 
James H. Eustice, as mortgagee, to 
secure th» payment of the ■ sum of 
Seven Hundred Seventy Five Dollars 
($775.00) dated January 15th, 19i9, 
filed for record in the office of the 
Register of Deeds of Pennington 
County,- Minnesota, on the 1st day of 
August, 1919, at 1 :00 o'clock P. M., 
■and duly recorded in the office of said 
Register of Deeds in Book 13 of 
Mortgages on page 495, will be fore- 
closed by a sale of the premises in 
said mortgage and in this notice de- 
scribed, at the Sheriff's oflice in the 
Court House in the City of Thief 
River Falls,- in the County of Pen 
n'ngtoh and State of Minnesota, at 
10 :00 o'clock in the forenoon of the 
30th day of July, 1920, to satisfy 
the amount then due on said mort- 
gage together with Fifty Dollars 
($50.00) as attorney's fees and the 
costs of this foreclosure, as stipulat- 
ed in said mortgage. 

That the lands described In said 
mortgage and which will be sold are 
Lot One (1); Two (2) and Three (3) 
in Block Twenty-Two (22) of- the 
Original Townsite of Thief River 
Falls, according to the plat thereof 
on file and of record in the office of 
the Register of Deeds in and for the 
County of Pennington and State of 
Minnesota; 

That pursuant to a provision in 
said mortgage to that effect, the said 
mortgagee has elected to declare and 
<iloes hereby declare the balance of 
the whole sum secured by said mort- 
gage Immediately due and payable 
on account of default having occurred 
in the payment of interest due on 
January 15th, 1920. 

That there now is due the sum of 
Seven Hundred Thirty - and 71-100 
Dollars ($730.71) on said mortgage. 
James H. Eustice 
Mortgagee. 
Dated June 2nd, 1920. 
J. J. Truax, 

Attorney for the Mortgagee 
843-45 Plymouth Building, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
J 8-15-22-29 July 0-13 



While oh an auto tour to various 
points in this state, Ben» Gestie of 
Bricelyn, accompanied by his uncle, 
Nels Gestie visited at the home of the 
letter's sister, Mrs. Can' Johnson, 
for a few hours Friday afernoon 
euroute from Thief River Falls to 
Fosston. 

The interior of the postoffice 
building has recently been renovated 
by a coat of paint. 

Roy Wallin, who is employed at 
Minneapolis, arrived the latter part of 
last week to visit at the home of 
his mother. 

Miss Mabel Patterson became .very 
ill Wednesday evening. The attend- 
ing physician found that she was suf- 
fering from ah attack of appendi- 
citis. Accordingly she was taken to 
the hospital at Thief River Falls and 
an operation was performed. At this 
writing she is getting along as- well 
as could be expected. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ole Loberg left Fri- 
day for Baudette to spend a few 
days with relatives. 

Ed Dahl motored to Crookston 
Saturday evening, and returned with 
Gust Anderson, P. Burstad dud Andy 
Dahl who are .employed et various 



Walter Berg visited with frends at 
Warren and Hallock over the week- 
end. 

An auto party comprising the K. JC. 
Gigstad family of this village and the 
Anton Anderson family of Rocksbu'ry 
township motored to Honeyford, N. 
D., Saturady evening and visited ;at 
the C. Foss home, returning Sunday 
evening.- 

The baseball team and a number!of 
the base bail enthusiasts of the vil- 
lage journeyed to Middle River Mon- 
day to take part in the Independence 
day celebration. In the baseball 
gamo between Middle,River and St. 
Hilaire, one of the many attractions 
of the day, the former team was vic- 
torious with a score of 3 to 4 in their 
favor. 

Mrs. O. T. Boeher, of Charles City, 
Iowa, left Monday for home, after' 
a pleasant visit at the home of her 
parents,- Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Brandt of 
Black River township. 

•Mr. and Mrs. W. Jahnda and baby, 
w-ho reside near Thief River Fall's, 
motored down Sunday 'afternoon for 
a brief visit at the H. Kalland home. 

Mr. and' Mrs. G. F. Laffley arrived 
Saturday to visit at the home -of 
the Matter's mother, Mrs; -M-.. Miller of 
Black "River township. Mr. Laffley 
left again Tuesday for their home at 
Madison, Wis., but his wife remained 
for a longer Visit. 

The T. K. Hovet fami'y left Satur- 
day afternoon on an . auto tour to 



* ivrurn- 
'joiirn at 



bui.'ding activities in that city, and 

who returned to Uieir^ respective ( nk'f^lUm anYvusl'on" *"i\, rZ 

turning Tuesday afternoon. 



COSTJALLED $2.15 

HALF 01 : FARA1ERS WOULD HAVE 
LOST AT THIS PRICE, DE- 
PARTMENT SAYS 



Test of Nerves 

First Doctor — How are the patients 
nerves? . 

Scond Doctor — Fine he can read all 
the headlines in the daily paper now 
without a tremor. 



home§ for a fourth of July visit. 

. The basebaU' team of Thief River 
Fall's ami St Hilaiie met on the local 
diamond Sunday afternoon, and play- 
ed one of the moot exciting games of 
the season. The battle v,*as hard 
fought and resulted in victory for the 
Vocals with a score of to 5 in their 
favor. The good roads and fine 
weather made it possible for a large 
number ot baseball enthusiasts to 
come, from far and near. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stearns of 
Bagiey motored up Sunday to visit 
with friends until the following day. 
Mrs. Harness, who prior her marriage 
was Miss Mae Barragy, formerl'y 
taught in the local schools and has 
many friends in the vili'agc who were 
glad to see her again. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Steinhauer and 
children of Holt motored down Sun- 
day to enjoy a brief visit at the A. 
Scaverson home. Mr. Steinhauer and 
eider son returned home the same 
evening but his wife and younger 
son remained for a couple of days 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Setarns of 
Minneapolis, who have, spent a few 
days at the home of the latter's par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. P. Simonson, left 
Monday for a brief visit with Mr. 
Steanrs' parents in North Dakota be- 
fore returning to Minneapolis. 



After a week's enforced vacation, 



due to the detay in securing cement 
for building . purposes, C. Beugtson 
and Henry Guustad left Tuesday for 
Beltrami to resume their employment 
as carpenters'. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Hooper of 
Madison, Wis., arrived Saturday to 
spend a few days at the home of the 
former's parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. 
Hooper, ^returning Wednesday. 

Mrs. John Hedman of Mcintosh is 
visiting at the home of her uncle. A. 
Satterberg, and with other relatives 
in this locality. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. O. Rurk 
cd Monday from a brief < 
Derriot. 

.E. W. Gallagher recently arrived 
from Kennare. N. I)., to assume 
charge of the G. N. ' depot. His 
household goods arrived Wednesday 
and the family are to reside in the 
Jas. Amble cottage on North Water 
street,. 

Miss Lulu Aden left Monday for 
a fortnight's visit witli friends near 
Northwood, N. D. 

, Miss t'.'ara Loberg and her brother 
Martin, who are attending summer 
school at the Bemidji Xormtl. arrived 
Friday 'to visit with the home foi"ks 
until the first of the. week. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Hooper. Mr. 
and Mrs. Chas. Hooper and Mrs. 
Xormnn Patterson enjoyed a motor 
tour to Map-'e Lake Monday. 

E. T. Gestie, the weli-knowu sales, 
man of Fargo, transacted business in 
tlie village Wednesday afternoon and 
motored to Crookston early Thursday 
morning. 



4 1 ♦ H ♦ ♦ H H ♦ H ♦ ♦ ♦ H ♦ M M M M H * It M M; M M M M ♦ M ♦ M M 



The Sun May Be Shining Bright 




to-day and to-mirrow the 
worst storm in years may 
break. It's the same w'ith 
the fire situation, you '..ever 
can tell when the devouring 
element may devour your 
property and cause you irre- 
parable loss. There is only 
one sure protection — a policy 
of fire, insurance In such 
strong companies as we rep- 
resent. If you are not pr»- 
tected, see us without delay. 
Don't let another night pass 
unless you are covered. 



Lawrence Mtg. Co. 



i/ 



t 315 Main Ave. N. Phone 443 

MHHHHMtlimHHIUmH I H I HII I IHHMHI I I II 



Washington— Cost of producing 
wheat ot the 1919 crop ■ averaged 
$2.15 a bush*, according to a survey 
made byi the department of agricul- 
ture^ At this price the department 
says, half the farmers would have 
lost money. The government guar- 
anteed price was $2.23. 

The survey ind'.uded a compila- 
tion of statistics from 481 farmers. 
Nine rs presentative winter wheat 
areas in Nebraska, Kansas and Mis- 
souri anl live spring wheat areas in- 
Minuesoa, North and South Dakota 
were visited by field men of the office 
of farm management. 

For w Inter wheat 284 records were 
taken a id for spring wheat, 197. 

On tv, o farms the cost was as low 
as ?1 a bushel. On 20 farms it was 
$5 or oer. There was one farm in 
the win er wheat area where the cost 
reached ?2.80. The average cost of 
producii g winter wheat was $1.87. 
In the s iring wheat areas the average 
cost wi s much higher— $2.05 — the 
range running from $1.10 for one 
farm to $15 and over for 17 farms. If 
the price received had equaled the 
average cost between 50 and 55 per 
cent of these wheat growers wouSd 
have failed to break even. 

Yields averaged 14.9 bushels an 
acre foi the winter wheat farms, and 
S.4 bushels for the spring wheat 
farms. The cost per acre was $27. SO 
for winter wheat, as against $22.40 
for spring wheat. 

Department .-■•peoiit'ists stale that 
to allow! a profit of SO per cent of the 
wheat produced 011 the farms covered, 
the price shoui'd have been about 
$2.30, as compared with an average 
cost ofl $2.15. At a price covering 
the average cost plus 10 per cent, 85 
per cent of the crop woui'd be cover- 
ed, but] 40 per- cent of the ■ growers 
still wo'uld fail to break even 



Home Furnishing Is 



You'll 



Our Business, 
Be Pleased Here 



One Assurance 
vou think the tale Miss Flirty 
told was made up on the face of it?" 
Ma; 'be not, but she was." 



"Do 







GOME IOCS FOR 



a 



^i^aaaswyj^a. .*, 



TOJung 

Uhat fells Goods 



O 



We make a study of the business of Furnishing 
homes. It is a business by itself . i 



When you come to us for suggestions in the 
furniture line we meet you on our ground and you will 
be served. 



We solve your furniture problems: You will be 
pleased each time you call. . 



Larson Furniture Company 



Main at Third 



y^ii(?&®&^Mm&^ 



- 'Vikqtnr-Tmm 



i*>aai ■^VtV.-S.yl'l?..-. ■■-.,< -.. ■ 






i 



Page Four ; 



The Tribune; 



SEMI-'iVBEKLY 



ESTABLISHED lOffl. 



Official Counly Paper 



Penninrton Pvintlnr Company 

Pobiiahers 



Thos. A. Way, President 



Published every. Tuesday and Friday 

it 

Thief River Palls, Minn. 



B. B. .McTnillnms, izditor and JIan 



liabiaties. Practically al of it 
is certain to be repaid sometime, in 
som< form or other — rapidly if inte--. 
nati< nal co-opreation ana reconstruc- 
tion proceed weH, and slowly if thity 
lag. There seems to be little reason 
to dpubt, too, that the interest will - 



THE AME RICAN PitESS ASSflCIATlnM 



Entered as second] class matter at the 
post office at Thief! Itiver Fails, Minn 
«nder the .Act of Maf-ch 3, 1S70. 



ANOTHER COSTLY VBTO- 
On the second i|ay of the eouveu- 
congrcss. rre<iik'iiJ Wilson saw lit 
to veto the budge* bib'. Represent- 
ing the. work of a [joint budget com- 
mittee, composed c| members of both 
the senate and tli| house, who had 
held protracted; hearings and given 
months of study t< the question, the 
measure was desig le'd to co-ordiuatt 
revenue, and expenditures of the gov- 
ernment in such ia V:ay as to bring an 
annua.! saving to I le people of hun- 
dreds of millions ,if dollars. Mr. 
Wilson admitted tli|it he favored the 
generail ptlicy of the proposed law, 
but because, the. bh l l did not bestow 
upon him the pow^r to remove two 
of the officials appointed under it, 



ire responsibility 
ole' measure into 



few 



acts of cou- 
the atten- 



be assumed the gr, 
of throwing the wi 
the discard^ 

There, have been 
gress that have redeivcd 
ion at the. 'capital and the discus 
• sion through the i ublie press that 
nave been given : to' the budget bill. 
Practically everyone] has recognized 
the substantial economics in Federal 
financing that wouWibe effected under 
its terms. Its passage represented the 
culmination of the ijftorts of publi'c 
spirited men in both houses of con 



t ^ju™ 



t-'T'i 



YHE TRIBUNE 



be piid, unless the United States in 
some moment of unusual generosity 
shou d decide to make the Allies a 
gift if the interest. 

He re, then, is an asset which, 
■aloii; with our government owned 
ship's and minor items that can be 
liquh ated, makes a volume of re- 
sources equal to about half our war 
debt. We are not so badly off, after 
a /I, i rovidiiig we do our part in pro- 
moth g Europe's ability to pay what! 
it owes us. 



andj eight republican.. 



tA *>. l z ^ 3 , ,L Tne business man and laboring 



gress 'over a period 



of years, during 



which time many bills pertaining to 

the. subject have bee 

considered. Special 

made during the elo; 

session to get the budget bill through 

in order that the estimates for the 
/fiscal year eudjng J me 
/ might be prepared 

visions. Congress 

ing its part in the g 

ter exhaustive study 

passed by both houses, a conference 

committee conipromit ed the differ 

ences in thought betwcen.the senate 

and house of representatives, and its 

report was accepted. 

put into filial 'form 



l introduced and 

exertion ■ was 

ing days of the 



.30, 1922, 
md'er its pro- 
lcceeded in do- 
eat reform. Af- 
he measure was 



The bill- .was 



White House for the 
woui'd make it law. 
strokes of the pen Hi 



nd sent to> the 
signature that 
With a* few 
Wilson vetoed 



liarly unfortunate, lanl 
of billions wi'.l be'pjl 



the measure and nut, fled the pains 
taking study which i s sections rep- 
resented. 

That the veto shtilild have come 
on the eve of adjoin' mieiit is pecu- 
an added tax 
:) jiced upon the 
country in consequence. Qongress 
will not meet again imti'. next De- 
cember. In the meantime the esti- 
mates upon which jwi i be based the 
appropriation, for tile next year wi:i 
have been prepared ii the same old 
way under the terms ^if the obsolete 
law which the budget]' law sought to 
replace. There wih'.'ie the same 
competition between departments for 
funds, the same jealc us rivalry be- 
tween bureau chiefs' t > see who can 
squeeze the most 'do lars from the 
puljio treasury, and :he same dis 
regard of what revenues will be 
available to meet |th| expenditures 
that will be urged, j TJhe public will 
be compelled to stand the burden- 
and pay the' cost of an antiquated 
financial system that everybody con- 
cedes should be abandoned — a'.l be- 
cause Wilson insisted that he be giv- 
en the power to ' remove ill his dis- 
cretion two of tile oflieins who were 
to administer the budget system. 

; a "" ' AVAR ASSETS ■ 

Whether a "favorable trade bal- 
ance is rea'ly as favorable as we used 
to think has been questioned a good 
thai lately. There is no doubt tho 
as to the main fact of the present 
balance, and. litt'.e doubt ^as to its 
ultimate benefits. 

During the war anil since, this 
country ha ; piled up s'tch a baianee. 
of $17.1100.000,000. Tlris means stm- 
p'y that the rest of the world, mostly 
Europe, has gone in debt to us to 
that extent. It is incomparably the 
largest trade balance ever run up for 
"or against any nation. 

'About $10,000.(100.000 of this vast 
sum represents war ioiius to the Al- 
lies. None of these !oa:is weie made 
in money ; they were merely credits 
■ — we si(d the Allies war materials 
- and commodities and' toik their notes 
for the stuff. Thus the whole ?17, : 
000.000,000 represents merchandise 
sold by Americans abrcad, in excess 
of merchandise Imported. • 

About $5,000,000,000 of' this sum 
has been wiped out,; $1,000,000,000 
of it in the form of American securi- 
ties formerly owned abroad and used 
in payment for our ; goods, and $1, 
000,000,000 jn gbid shipment}; to 
this country v Thus Europe sti'l owes 
us about $12,000,000,000,. 

That fact, of course, 5s responsible 
for much of our high prices and in- 
flated credit. But let it not be for- 
gotten I bat it is a valid debt, an=-as- 
set'wbich can be put bver against our 



CRIME AND LIQUOR 
(Sioux City Journal) 
Tb ; New York Times, an open ad- 
vocat ? of a liberal prohibition law 
and .- constant opponent of the pro- 
hibiti in amendment, says editoriaVly 
that "prohibition is reducing crime 
IuiNe;v York state." If that is a fact, 
why should not prohibition remain 
salooi. keeper having a more potent 
most ardent wets that the saloon is 
not o;ily a breeder of crimes but for 
years before its extermination was 
a dan jenous influence in politics, the 
aged in legitimate busines.,. He had 
voice u ail parties than the man en- 
bis paitical policies and cast their 
infloei.ee because the soaks- who 
drank at bis bar were ready to cast 
their -otes as he desired. When he 
could no longer "set 'em up on the 
house, ' the inebriates lost interest in 
his political' poslieies and cast their 
votes iecordiug.to their sober instead 
of the r soused judgments. 

It v> as alleged that the elimination 
of the sai'oon tax would -inrease tax- 
ation. But the contrary has been 
found true. The reduction of crime 
direct! ' due to the elimination of the 
saloon and the drink evil has re- 
duced he public expenditures for the 
prosecution of crime and the pro- 
tection of society more than the in- 
come from saloon license would have 
brought in. Prohibition has been a 
saving] instead of an expense to the 
tax payer. ' 

There is food for thought in the 
confession of the New York Times 
just now when the democratic party 
is divifled in counsel and votes on 
the question of holding that which 
has been gained by prohibition 
return! ig to the saloon, "for if the 
wets win in the platform flgbt at 
San Fiuneisc- and the party should 
by any accident win iu the November 
electior , immediately- upon assuming 
power : t will take steps to repeat the 
probibi ion amendment and the whoi'e 
fight will' have to be waged again in 
the states. The liquor interests 
realize now that they cannot beat 
down (he amendment as it stands 
They understand it can be repealed 
oni'y b; r submitting an amendment 
to repcil it to the states for ratili 
caion. That is what they propose 
to do. That is what the wet plank 
at San Francisco is for. It is the 
opening wedge. The election of the 
party ot that platform in November 
woui'd le a widening' of the cleft and 
Hie otlipr conditions naturally would 
foh'ow. 



women will Ybte;,' ilm norma* popu- 
lar majority is republican in 
WgdVof tljein/.. '■. ■ -' \ 
l^nX;re#njbiienis have nothing to' 
lose and much to gain by hasten--: 
ing the ratification of the nineteenth 5 
amendment. Arret. uy they have the" 
support of a large majority of the 17,- 
500,000' women ami will gain the 
support of at least one-third of the 
remaining 9,500,0u5 women. 

The majority wi'i be the republi 
cans undoubtedly. 

To republican majorities in con 
gress the 117,500,000 owe their right 
to -vote. 

To republican sympathy and sup- 
port the 9,500,000 remaining women 
wil^ ow(e the acquisition dlf their 
rights in case the nineteenth amend- 
ment is put through. Which state 
is the vehio)e, is unimportant. Who 
flna<-y crowns the right is still more 
unimportant. The only important 
matter is that the amendment' is rati- 
fied and the 9,500,000 women given 
the right to vote for president this 
year. 

Not the president who reluctantly 
comes in at the last moment after 
the battle practically has been won, I 
but the man and the men who have I 
been in the fight from the first and 
borne the brunt of the batti'e, are 
deserving of credit. 

President WOson and the demo- 
crats who are making this suffrage 
move in Tennessee, are playing poli- 
ties. Senator Harding and the re- 
publicans who have been in the tight 
from the first, are responding to 
right, justice and principle. 

Women promoters of suffrage wil' 
be just and give credit where credit 
belongs. 



Jng together. We pirow OTer a . 
twq^.-Bu(pTr^;Baggage^oe&sionally, but in 
in the- 'ifiaraiwiat-'hiips " one helps 
all. ttt|s ^KlQipJiefnl, cheerful, 
.grateful for.-ffi&lmos.tbptaitifol year. 

.'-.:. It appears", that *W greatest risk 
;the soldiers now run is the War Bisk 
Bureau. Scandals in this department 
come thick and fast. ■'• 



It appears ' that "hit 'em again" 
was the key-note, of the Democratic 
National Con-entiori. So this is the 
high-tide of Wii'son Democracy. 



. The Lord sends the rain, the rain 
aids the crop, and the crop makes 
the frrmer rich. The farmer aids the 
business man and furnishes .the food 
for the laboring man. 



TUESDAY, JULY i 3 , icao 



next day down the Soo tine route. 
T>e .trip north wilt be made up the 
Great Northern route and will be in 
the interests of the fair and a gener- 
al get se'quairited trip. The band 
wid' be taken along and it is planned 
to make stops of one half hour in 
each place. A general good time is 
anticipated and it is hoped there ,wiW 
be a large turnout when the proces- 
sion is formed. 



The Congregational Church 

of Rosewood 
Rev. Werner Drotts, Pastor 
Services will be held next Sunday 
at 10:30 a. in. and S p. m. Young 
peoijes meeting will be' held next 
Saturday at S p. m. Coffee and cake 
will be served. All 



terest to everyone is presented every 
night. That the attendance is targe 
need not be mentioned, as you have 
no doubt heard about the large tent 
being filed. If you understand the 
Scandinavian language- these meet- 
ings are for you! The'.nieetings are 
free and we invite you to come and 
bring your friend. 

Miss Clara Myhre left Tuesday 
for her home in Minneapolis, after 1 ' 
spending several weeks 'with Mrs. 
Orme and other friends in this city. ' 



are wei'come. 



'My policy; my programme; my 
will," was the key-note of the San 
Francisco convention. Where, oh 
where, is the Jefrersjpniau democ- 
racy? 



Ladies Aid 

I The Presbyterian Woman's Mis- 
sionary society wi}'. meet with Mrs. 
Baraekman on Friday. July 16 ai 
3»p. m ( 



On the second day of theconven- 
tiou, Mr. Bryan was sufficiently 
aroused to caii' it "an administra- 
tion controlled convention." It was 
all that. 



Postmaster Genera'. Burleson is 
charged with "nullification" of por- 
tions of the retirement law. "Nulli- 
fication seems to be a' favorite word 
of the Democrats. 



Sell Much Machinery 
Spoiler brothers of Mnvie are do- 
ing a big business in farm niacliinery 
and tuning out much new niachiiicry 
to the farmers in that vicinity. Last 
week they sold a Cletrac tractor 



NOTICE 



OF ANNUAL SCHOOL 
MEETING 

Notice is hereby given 
annual meeting of the 
voters of Independent Scho'o 
number eighteen of i' ( 



that the 

qualified 

i District 

L'ennington 



couty. Minnesota, will bo lii-id llt the 
Auditorium in the city of Thief River 
Fails in said county on July 17. 1020 
at. seven o'clock P. M.. for the pur- 
pose of electing two directors, each 
for a term of three years, to succeed 
F. F. Haynes and II. S. \ Dahlen, 
whose terms will expire, and to trans- 
act any other business which 
come before the meeting 

The following aie ihe names of 

T c Th„n,„, „ t *i t 1 to i die candidiites for the office of school 

J. c L...dberg at that place and are, director for whom applications have 

ngurmgo,, several more tractor pros- j been filed and their, Lncs be pHcId 

pects at the present timel The terri- • on the bnliot as s„c -nudicHtes at 

tor,- 1,1 and around Mavie is on the up- 1 said meeting. ,o-wit • None ' 

farmers are fast! July 7. 11120 ■ 

of the vi«' liable sec- ! 



may 



Party cheers and partisan eulogies 



Big Auto Tour the 27th 

Ail who plan to take in the big 
auto tour to be held on Tuesday, July 
27th, should notify the secretary of 
the commercial club and the secre- 
tary of the auto club in order that 
they may know how many i(an to 



grade and good 
making that one 
tions of the country. 



I 



P. 



cannot take the place of principles -or '" !nke " le tri " a " d to n " ,kp - the »«* S - 
trutIu 1 • i' L *" 1 sary arrangements up the line for the 



Visits in City Friday 

Mrs. Emma Harwood, the well 
known editor of Roosevelt, visited in 
this city Friday with friends on her 
return from a visit in North Dakota 
and an -inspection tour of the Yel- 
lowstone park. 



Accomodation of the 



Already Son-in-taw MeAdoo is 
charged with insincerity, not by re- 
publicans, but by democrats. 



The Bible Chautauqua 

We wish to announce to the pub- 



O. Myhrum 

Clerk. 



. ,, , -,, 1M,:t - v - rt 'sM''- tliat the Rib e Chautauqua that 

planned lo leave this city eari'y in the j is being conducted in the tent on "he 
morning and make Warroad that I corner of LaBrc 
evening, stopping over night at that j street will 
place and making the. return trip the 



conic 



avenue anil Fourth 
continue for some rime to 
new subject of vital in- 



Notice To Contractors 
Scaled proposals will l K . received 
at the office of the Town clerk of 
the Town of N011I1. Comity of Pen- 
nington. Siale of Minnesota until 
Two o'cVoi-k. p. M. on the 31st day 
of July 1020 for the construction of 
two piers and one abut ment on the 
Long- Bridge. Plans for the proposed 
work may bo seen ai the Town clerk's 
office Thief River l'al.s. Minn. 
July 7tli. 1920. 

T. II. 
Town t'kM'Ic. Town 
July 9-111-23 



Iijerko 
of North. 



ANOTHER PROPOSED 
SURRENDER 

The fetate Department under the 
present -un-American administration 
propose| 111,0 " ler surrender of Ameri- 
can rigl ts and interests. 

Seere':nry of State Colby has sent 
to the Senators a letter outlining a 
proposed fisheries treaty between the 
United jStates and Great Britain 
which would grant to Canadian Ash- 
ing vessels preferential privileges in 
ports ofj the United States with free- 



dom from port dues or charges, 

The privileges of 
American ports now is the exclusive 



The privileges of entry and sale in 




If is 



:■■■■ . a: I- -di x-l > ■$ 3«i&J*&&L:*&i^>is<^k£3M 



'prerogative of fishing vessel's of the 
United States. It is a part of the 
great American doctrine of protec- 
tion .to American interests. '< 

The proposed, treaty will' give the 
fishinglessels of the United States, 
presuniifbly like interests and rights 
11 the 1 nits of Canada, and in addi- 
tion the right to'tand and sell in Can 
adian p irts without the payment of 
duty.- 

The r ght of American fixliin 
els to land in Canadiau ports for 
supplies etc., already is available 
under tl e treaty of ISIS. The pro- 
posed, tr 'tity wid surrender the Aiiier 
ican ma :kets to Canadian market — a 
hard bit gain of ' inestimable vaite to 
Canadia is. The present adminislra- j 
tiou pro lose: to exchange the Amer- 
ican market for the Canadian mar 
kef — a uird bargain for the United 
Stales. This is another chapter in 
the Frei Trade sU>ry of the Wilson 
adminisi ration. 

If thi i proposed treaty is ratified, 
within live or six years, there will 
not- be 1 single fishing vessoi on the 

■North Af'antic or North Pacific coast 

1 
1 
American fishermen will! 
be drive 1 from these waters. 

This i ; another surrender of Ainer 
rests suggested by the Wil 
nistration. 



The Fordson Operates All 
Makes of Threshers 
Inehiding the Geiser 




or the threat Lakes flying the Amer- 
ican fla; 



ican inte: 
son adm 



'AHA {K THE REPUBLICANS 



stated with authority that 



17,500,0 )0 women wiil vote for the 
presiden in thirty states. t 

-U'.togcther in the United States 
there nrf 27,000,000 women of vot- 
ing age. 

The d fference, ft.500,000 'will vote 
if tile ni leteeufh amendment is rati 
fled in ti ne. 

Of the eighteen states where these 
0,500,00 I reside, ten are democratic 



Of Course, You Want A Fordson 

. The Fordson is an ideal tractor for your farm/ It is biiilt com- 
pactly, simply, yet with abundant power. It pulls a two-bottom 
P rZ a ?, d Wl11 do a Proportionate amount of other farm work. 

The Fordson engine is unusual. It is simple, easily cared for, > 
and so designed that the farmer can give any attention requird in 
service. The entire head of the cylinders, which are cast enbloe, 
can be l'emoved for grinding valves. 

The air is cleaned with an improved air washer. A special carbureator allows the 
use of kerosene— without any of the troubl e that is commonly associated with this fuel 

Remember The Fordson Service , 

We carry a complete stock of Fordson parts. Should -you have an accident or a bad 
breakdown, you need only to phone us and we will have a Fordson mechanic on the 
way. We can -make any repairs to a Fordso n within a few hours. The cost is lo"- com" 
pared -with the other tractors. 



1^ 



»us _jl raciLor — i ne r orason 

The Fordson traGtor, has attracted the attention of every civilized country. It is 
.used by thousands in Europe today. It has shown the way to make farms produce 
more— in every country— and of evry size. Built right— simple, durable, economi- 
cal, easy to operated-easy to care for^Jhe 
Fordson fulfills every requirement. It will make your farm a more profitable invest- 
ment, will take worries off your shoulders. Burns kerosene, all gears are enclosed. 

. ■■>'■/ The Fordson is built especially to meet the 

needs for a tractor which must be cared fo r by the operator himself. 

McFairland Auto Company 

. i" Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



/ 




ffiSBIftrtifek^^^j^a:)^-^ 1 ^^ ., 



L 






ss— 



:«t- 



\( 






TUESDAY, JULY 13, 1926 







LACK DENIED 
BY BANKERS 



Labor. Greatest Need, Cash Being 
Paid for Goods — Loans Held 
. Back for Luxuries 



— r ■ 



Minuesflte fanners need farm Iielp 
more than farm loans, bankers of the 
-state agreed m ans-'vor to recent 
letters .sent out by J. H- Hay, state 
deputy commissioner of agriculture, 
urging liberal credit to enable farmers 
to buy labor .saving machinery, to- 
ward increasing crop production. 

Most farmers of :be state have 
cash and are paying cash for every- 
thing, the "bankers reported. 

Some bankers complained of in- 
ability to finance ix'ctls of. farmers 
because they cannot discount paper" 
with the Federal Reserve bank, Mr. 
Hay said. Tim replies indicated gen- 
erally, however, that the farmers' 
need of credit is being cared for, and 
that curtailments jari mainly on re- 
quests for Soaus to buy automobiles, 
lighting plants arid -jxpensive mach- 
inery. 

"While the faimer, generally 
speaking, is a 'level headed fellow," 
wrote one.' Minnesota banker, "yet the 
germ that seems to be inocuVatcd into 
the brain of Americans today to buy 
gasoline engines instead of milk cows 
is not encouraged by us. We are 
more than glad ' to back the farmer 
for anything he wants, but if the time 
spent in uselessly driving cars was 
spent in developing stock there would 
be a first class creamery where there 
is a gas tank in many places today." 
— Minneap«fis Tribune. 

This banker probably knows more 
about "gas tanks"] than he does about 
banking, farming, jor cows. The farm- 
er owns ail the cows and some of 
the autos, and we do not know any- 
one more entitled-, to the auto's. Sit- 
ting on cushions aud giving advice 
to the -farmer is old stuff and becom- 
ing more and more unpopular. 




When {Warren G. Harding, Republican pre?ldentlal nominee, 
returned to his home at Marion, O.. July 6, the first time since the 
nomination, one 'of the most touching scenes was the meeting or 
Father and son. Dr. Geo. T. Hcrdins, now 76 years old, is slid prac- 
ticing medicine at Marlon. This photo shows Senator Harding and 
'rtle with Dr.. Harding. The inset is of James Sloan, former secret 
ervice man. who has been known as "Jimmy" to three P^g® 1 **-- 
floosevelt. Taft and Wilson. He has been engaged to ^ ard ; Ha ""J!f 
fend has established his post on the front porch of the Harding home 
ft Marion. ■ * ■ \ 



Armistice Off 

Louise — Care and Edith have not 
spoken to each other for mouths, but 
now they are inseparable again. They 
go everywhere together. 

Julia — Yes ; they decided to renew 
hostilities.. ', . ■ 



ANf HRAGITE 
CpAL RAISES 
1.95 PER TON 



ALL SIZES TO AD- 
i CENTS MONTHLY 



PRICES^F 
VAljlCE I 

TRADE JOURNAL SAYS 



Do not wait until you 
pair ..\v"brk that is nee 



ded 



Ant:iraeitc. coal is $1.95 a ton high- 
er, no steam coal is on hand and nut 
cnaV i> being sold at $10.30 a ton, ac- 
cordin ; to the CoaV Trade Journal. 
Discu! sing the coal situation in the 
twin c ities, the Coal Trade Journal in 
its cu rent issue says: 

"Tv in city coal consumers can 
cheer up with fill assurance, appar- 
ently, that the worst is yet to come. 
Order.- for 'anthracite for immediate 
derive y are being taken at many" of 
the slops at an advance, of about $2 
the ton above the close of the 1910- 



Page Five 



THEv tlMlL IS lH 

SIGHT l 



BUREAU TELLS AUTO OWNERS 
TO "DRIVE ON" 



1920 coal year. Considerable anthra- 
cite has been received. 

"June prices for anthracite at re- 
taV- are: Xut (> $16.30; stove, ?1'6.20; 
cjrg, $16; pea, $14.60; buckwheat, 
$12.90. These prices afford a better 
margin for the dealer against the 
time of settlement with mine owners. 
Also they cover an advance of wages 
for teamsters, increased -cost in other 
respects and advancing prices for ma- 
terial. The price of all sizes wili' ad- 
vance automatically 10 cents a ton the 
first of every month. It is expected 
that before the winter campaign is 
over prices will be stl.l higher. 

"Twenty-two years ago nut an- 
thracite coai" sold for $6 a ton in the 
twin cities. Rates have not far to 
go before they wiL' have trebled the 
rates of two decades ago. 

"State expenses took another up- 
ward leap when contracts were let 
for $4,700 tons of coai" for state in- 
stitutions at prices averaging about 
$2 a t.on more than were paid last 
year." 



Gasoline supplies are increasing. 
-The latest bureau of mines report 
shows that the reserve stocks on 
hand at the refineries in March tota'i 
ed over G26,000\000 gallons, and 
'serves to offset some of the startling 
statements that have been made re- 
garding the gasoline supply. 

■ In fact, this gasoline scare has 
been largely psychological, in the 
opinion of the federal trade commis- 
sion. The failure in' certain - north 
Texas fields upset some of the. oil 
men and made an immediate short- 
age seem possible. 

The year 1920 has begn fortun- 
ately, however, and there are a good 
many factors which point to increas- 
ed production. . 

Refiners can get twice the amount 
of gasoine from oil' by using the 
"new "cracking" processes. The big 
mid-west companies using the mod- 1 
ern methods are getting a 35 s per j 
cent yield from crude; but refiners i 
elsewhere are getting only 12 to 22 ; 
per cent. The cost of installing the' 
new processes will make the change' 
slow, but if any absolute shortage ' 
should confront the market, oh' .men j 
say this means can be taken to meet ! 
it. This would mean an increase oft 
CO^per cent in our present supply. I 
- Mexico an Oil Empire j 

Mexico is another source of future | 
supply, which has been aVniost doubl- j 
ing its shipments to the Americau j 
market every year. In 1919 the Mex- j 
icau market shipped 52.622,000 bar- i 
rels of crude oil to the United States, 
most of it to the Atlantic coast. \ 

David White of the United States j" 
geological survey sees infinite possi- 
bilities in oil obtainer from shale, ai- 



Citation for hearing; on Petition for 
Administration. 

-Estate of . Angu$t. _0. Schneider 

, State of Minnesota, County of Pen- 
nington in Probate Court. 

In the matter of the Estate of 
August O. Schneider, Decedent. 

The State of Minnesota, To The- 
r ssa Schneider and all persons in- 
terested in the granting of adminis- 
tration of the estate of said deced.; 
ent: The petition of Theressa 
Schneider having been filed in this 
Court, representing^ that August O. 
Schneider, then a resident of the 
County of Pennington, State of Min- 
nesota, died intestate on the 29th 
day of May 1920, and praying that 
letters of administration of his 
estate be granted to Xick Bundhund 
and the Court, having fixed the time 
and place for hearing said petition 
THEREFORE, YOU AND EACH! OF 
YOU, are hereby cited and required 
to show cause, if any- you have, be- 
fore this Court at the Probate Court) 
Rooms in the Court House, in the | 
City of Thief River Fall's in the i 
County of Pennington, State of Min- 
nesota, on the 24th. day of July 



1920,- at: Ten- o'clock A. M., why 
said petition should not be granted. 

Witness, the Judge of said Court, 
and the seal of said Court, this 29th. 
day of June 1920. 

Ira. C. Richardson, 
(Court Seal) Probate Judge. 

J. M. Bishop 

Attorney for Petitioner 
j-2-9-16 ■ 




TWOMINUTETAIKSMMEWNS. 

America Firs! *^«SL. Association, 



P 



A Share 

Barber — Har cut, sii? 

Customer— No not a hair cut; only 
a mouthful of lather, 15. minutes of 
onion breath and the tip of my ear 
cut off. 



UNITED AMERICANS 

By William C. Deming, Editor Stockman and Farmer, Cheyenne, Wyoming. 

Because of the unsettled condition of affairs th'rough- 
ou the country, the growing unrest among laboring 
classes, the activity of radicals, particularly from- foreign 
lands, and the disposition in certain quarters to attack 
private property and even overthrow the government, if 
possible, conditions which have been disclosed by congres- 
sional hearings. and official investigations, a nation wide 
movement is in progress to bring all good American 
citizens together upon the proposition to uphold the gov- 
ernment and the constitution, to preserve properly rights, 
to respect national and state laws, to stabilize business 
and promote a program of reconstruction. 

It is proposed to accomplish this by a new organ- 
ization called the United Americans, to be established in 
every state and to co-operate with a national organ- 
tho this great supply has not been } ization of the same name and same object, 
tapped in great quantities until more 1 This movement is not against anyone or anything except elements which 

machinery has been developed I are destructive of American ideals, but it is distinctly for the American gov- 

ernment. the American constitution nnd the American flag. 

EveryjAmerican citizen, native born or naturalized is eligible to member- 
ship. 

It is hoped we can soon register fifty million 100 per cent Americans who 
will be known both by the lives they lead, and the little bronze button on the 
lapel of the coat. .... ....... 

Let's go. 




. Mr. "White says: "The ol'. shale 
deposits of the United States are a 
possible source of oil in amounts far 
greater than all the amiable nat- 
ural petroleum of this hemisphere. 
They form an enduring asset, suffi- 
cient to sustain an enormous ^ulti- 
mate '.oad for an indefinite period." 



Joy Killer 
Our idea of a pessimist is a person 
who can't admire orange blossoms 
for thinking of the lemon crop. 



:KMEN. 



Q&&* FATHERS, MOTHERS, CHILDREN, WORKMEN. AND EM- 
PLOYERS OF LABOR— ALL LOYAL AMERICANS— will you not 
devote five minutes to-day, to un earnest study of some of the nnat 
truths of our National lifet 



^~n~ 



Harvest Time is Near at Ha 




ARE YOU READY? 




are about to start in the field before getting ready with what new machinery you may need and any new re- 
". Everything will be difficult to get from now on, and the farmer who prepares is the one who'll profit. 



A FEW BINDERS LEET 



Gut of several carloads 



have a few left that have not been sold. We expect 
a oouple of carloads in this 
gone we will not be able to 
season. Remember that on 



of new binders we only 



week and when they are 
secure any more for this 
r stock of binders is limit- 



ed, as we have already sola a large number of them. 
We will only be able to takje care of eight or ten more 
orders for binders. 



We carry a full line o 
and Other modern 



GEISER 

Small Tractor Thresher 

ANY AND ALL MAKES OF 

TRACTORS INCLUDING THE 

FORDSON, -OPERATES 

THIS THRESHER 

E. B. Geiser Nos. 4 and 5 Threshers 
are ideal machines jor farmers or 
groups of farmers doing their own 
threshing. They efficiently meet the 
large and increased demand by gas 
TRACTOR OWNERS for a compact 
light weight, yet durable, SMALL 
TRACTOR THRESHER with a big 
capacity. Every grain growing 
TRACTOR OWNER can save money 
time and labor with an E-B Geiser. 










The Tractor That 
Mother, Son or 
Granddad Can Operate 

25 % More Pow 




This new E-B 12-20, S. A. E. rat- 
ing, Tractor pulls as much as a 
15-25. Pulls a full 12-20 load with 
ample reserve for emergencies. 

.. The Most Power for the Weight 
and Money ever offered. 

All gears are enclosed and dust- 
proof — running in oil. Only 3 



grease cups to be fillefl daily. 

It's a four-wheel tractor — all 
wheels out of furrow. 

The engine is standard E-B 
4-cylinder Kerosene Motor. 

This is the tractor for your work. 
Come in and see it. 



everything in Farm Machinery, Power Washing Machines, Cream Separators, Gasoline Engines 
conveniences. Remember that we're here to serve you the best on the market at the lowest prices. 



Across 
from ' 
Auditorium 







T-r 



COMPANY 



^jj^^ ^sbi^a^M^giiMi 



If " 
ii — 




SUGAR PROHTE 
ESCAPE 



Federal Attorney 
ing Balked By 
Poor L 



JRS 
REGUUTION 

Tells of Be- 
I!ourts and 
aws 



q 



Denver, Colo.— In a strong letter to 
the Gunnison (Col.) Empire, written 
on June 3, Harry H. Tedrow, United 
States attorney, explains how he was 
blocked by poor laws and courts from 
restraining the sugar profiteers of 
Colorado. 

Attorney Tedrow's 'letter reads in 
full as foli'ows: 

Hon. C. T. Raw'alt, ; 

Gunnison, Ctfqrado. 

My Dear Mr. RawaYt: The three 
different prices for sugar made by 
jobbers at practically the same time 
for Gunnison possibly, find an expla* 
nation in the following: 

The northern Colorado territory is 
served by the Great "Western Sugar 
company, whose price to the jobber 
is $12. S2 per hundred. The Arkansas 
valley, the south and western pait s of 
the; state, are supposed to be served 
by the. factories 1 in their respective 
localities. These Matter charge a 
higher price to the jobber than the 
Great Western, "; claiming that their 
cost of production is greater. The 
department of justice has recognized 
as reasonable a profit of 1 cent per 
pound to the jobber and 2 cents per 
pound to the retailer, or 3 cents per 
pound between the refiner and the 
consumer. The Gunnison dealer who 
buys of the Denver jobber woui'd find 
liis cost based upon the northern Col- 
'orado refiner's price.- The dealer, who 
buys in Pueblo would find ' his cost 
based upon the Arkansas vitfi'ey re- 
liner's price. My information is that 
the sugar refinery which is supposed 
to serve the. western slope did not re- 
serve any sugar this year for the 
people of that region, but sold it else- 
where, and so it is -necessary to bring 
in sugar from outside the state, for 
western Colorado, including cane 
sugar from the Fadfie coast. Here 
would create the possibility for a 
third and higher price. * 

1 Enjoined by Court 

I have been enjoined from prose- 
cuting under that feature of the 
Lever act, which forbids exacting, ex- 
cessive, or unreasonable prices, and 
can not proceed until the supreme 
court of the United States passes 
upon its constitutionality. In th6 case 
of the 13 Denver merchants versus 
Tedrow, I construed Hie hoarding 
provisions of rthe act as' authorizing 
prosecution of speculators for ship- 
ping sugar out of the state, and that 
it empowered me to keep in Colorado 
that proportion of Us own sugar to 
which it is entitled, and I made some 
arrests, procured indictments, and 
seized some sugar. Yesterday, in 
connection with one of. these indict- 
ments, the federal court ruled that 
my position in that respect is legally 
unsound, so that at this writing. the 
entire Lover act, so far as it applies 
in Colorado is practicably inoperative. 

No Adequte Law 

There is no federal law dealing 
with profiteering excect the Lever 
act. Furthermore, its life is expressly 
dpendeut upon the ■ existence of a 
state of war witli Germany, and when 
peace conies it dies .indeed, congress 
may kill it before then. Is there any 
hope that congress wou.'d pass a sub- 
stitute, if this piece of "legislation ex- 
pires? The .Hinted powers of the na- 
tional government five room for the 
legui claim that the national governs 
ment can not deal with profiteering at 
all in times of peace, although with 
this I personally do not agree, in view 
of the latitude which the courts have 
given congress und)er the interstate 
commerce and iritehip.I. revenue pro- 
visions of the Constitution. However, 
the state undoubtedly * do have a 
cleaier right, and it. is too bad that 
-the states keep eternally surrendering 
their powers to the national govern- 
ment, or at least, depend upon Wash- 
ington to do everything for their peo_ 
p«. The proper sp:rit would be co- 
operation between the states and the 
, national government in this complex 

■ problem of increased cost of living. 
It is to be regretted that the governor 
of Colorado dec.ined to incorporate 

■ the subject in the call for the extra 
session of the geueial assembly, when 



"If the peoples are to be preserved 
from starvation and civilization from 
destruction, not a moment must now 
be lost in making the people aware 
of their great danger and in assist- 
ing them to co-operate. In order to 
overcome it the worid must be ani- 
mated by a new spirit or perish." 



PIONEER OF ST. PAUL 

IS DEAD AT CROOKSTON 



petitioned to do so. Something might 
have been accomplished. The state of 
Colorado can do something in the way 
of co ii, for it actually, owns . coal 
miner. The extinction of the middle- 
man when possible would ontribute 
towa; d lowering costs to the consum 
er, and .at the same- time tend to 
bringjto the producer that greater pro- 
portion of the products of his toil 
which is absoi'uttfy imperative. 

You may use any part of the fore- 
going! for print which ycu desire. I 
wish a had time to write a book upon 
"the thoughts that arise in me." 

"Wi.th best wishes, I remain, 
Sincerely, 

HARRY B. TEDROW , 
United States Attorney. 



SAYS FINANCIER 

SIR GEORGE PAISH SEES CtfAOS 

BROUGHT BY PRESENT 

POLICIES 



New ■ York City — Sir George 
oue of the best known men in 
international finance, who ha^ served 
England on financial missions to 
America on several important crises, 
is thq latest to. denounce the po'icies 
agreed on by the peace council and 
pursued since that time. 

None of the European labor or So- 
cialist leaders engaged in flgnting 
impeilaliom in thejrrespectivenations 
have [enounced it in more open terms 
Ulan loes Paisii in a current number 
ol a Iiondou magazine, Ways and 
Mean ;. 

"Nations, capitalists and working 
force.' are vying with each other," 
says Paisii, "in their effort to secure 
individual advantage and are bring- 
ing tl e world to ruin. 

"U itil now I have, from time to 
time, directed attention to the eco- 
nomic and financial" situation in con- 
expectation that the dangers 
and- wou'xl be averted when 
in power became aware of their 



lident 
could 
those 
existence. Never was there greater 



need 



"N 



of a liberal policy of interna- 



tional understanding and of interna- 
tiona . co-operation, but probably 
never were the individual nations 
more intent upon pursuing their own 
narrow interests regardless of the 
disus er which such policy at this 
time jnust entai:. 



Imperialism Destroys 



)twithstanding the suffering 01 
war 1 rought about by the intenion of 
the centra!/ powers to promote their 
own -marrow interests; regardless of 
the inevitable injury -which they 
would commit against humanity and 
theinseives, the victorious powers are 
now pursuing a similar policy which 
mustjentail an even greater degree of 
suffering not only upon the central 
powers but upon themselves as well. 

"Never was it so necessary for the 
powers to seek their own good by 
prompting, general good and never 
werej they less willing to do so. 

"So far as it is possible to come to 
definite conclusions the course the 
nations are pursuing threatens to 
bring about almost complete paraly 
sis of trade and commerce within the 



next 
any 



few months. I cannot now see 
possible method of preventing 



are 
and 
by 



,i; •:.- -!■-:/ v. V y ,.|..V-P:,l d; v.- ^,;. Ik *s 'riA!| 



the franc from fading as far or near- 
ly as far as the mark, while deprecia 
Hon of the lire may be nearly as 
great Nor can I discover any step 
ilketj to be taken until after the mis- 
chief has been done, which can pre. 
vent the'pound from falling from its 
present of under $4 to ?3 or»even 
lowei .■ 



New Spirit Needed 

"Tfhe nations, one after, the other, 
filing into the abyss of poverty 
I rivation created by the war and 
tqe nature of the peace. 



The funeral' of David H. Turner, 
St. Paul pioneer, who died at Crook- 
ston yesterday after an illness of 
three years, will take place there to- 
morrow. He was 63 years old. 

He was born in St. Paul in 1857. 
He entered the employ of Pdtlock 
Donaldson & Ogden, now Merrill, 
Greet & Chapman, at the age of 18 
and \had been with the firm ever 
since. 

Mr. Turner was an active member 
of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers 
and a close friend of J. J. Hill and J. 
Cj IJurbank. He urged the erection 
of a HiU. memorial in a "Burbauk 
Square," to be developed from the 
bloci between Smith Park and the 
new Union Station. 

He leaves a widow, who was Miss 
Lizzie C* Bohrer, daughter of J. M. 
Bohrer of St. Pan", and three daugh- 
ters. 



a worthy citizen. 

At the funeral services in Crooks- 
ton, on Saturday at two o'clock, Mr. 
Greer, Mr. Sorenson, Mr. Bekman 
and Mr. Storhdi'm were our repre- 
sentatives. 

The funeral took place Saturday at 
two o'coek from the First Congre- 
gational church. 



IN vAPPRECIATION OF 

DAVID H. TURNER 




T CROOKSTON, MINN. 
JULY 7th, 1920 



Mr. Turner entered the employ ot 
Pollock, Donaldson & 'Ogden on Sep- 
tember 24th, 1S74, at the, age 01 
seventeen years, beginning an asso- 
ciation whicli- continued without a 
break for forty-six years, the longest 
in the history of the business. 

About 1S82 Mr. Turner became a 
traveling representative for the house. 
The hard, times and grasshopper 
years of the seventies were past, and 
railroads were pushing into the 
northwest in the fake of immigra- 
tion. His route followed the main 
Hue of the Northern Pacfie to its ad- 
vancing terminus, and included ev- 
erything north to the Canadian 
boundary 1 . 

Now eight routes have been estab- 
lished in territory that Mr. Turner 
pioneered in company with men who 
became his life long friends, making 
team trips in advance of the rail- 
roads that were measured by hun- 
dreds of miles and weeks of time. 

As a salesman, Mr, Turner's stand- 
ards were high. He was i"oyal to his 
house; always watchful for the in- 
terests of his customers, who recog- 
nized his steiUng integrity of char- 
acter, and learned to rely upon his 
sound judgment. 

Mr. Turner was not 0111'y a good 
business man, but a good citizen. 
His early home at St. "Paul in 'old 
lower, town' gave him acquaintance 
with men .who became Headers in the 
development of {he Northwest, in- 
cluding Mr. James J. Hill, who was 
his personiKl friend. He was a use- 
ful citizen of Crookston, and aggres- 
sive in everything that affected the 
welfare of St. Paul. 

As a member of the Minnesota 
Historical Society, and Territorial 
Pioneers, he gavel, invaluable service. 

The friends who have sympathized 
with the sorrows that came to Mr. 
Turner's home, wi)l remember that 
they were not few, nor such that 
time assuages, but each was met "with 
characteristic fortitude. 

After thi<ee yiears jof retirement 
from active service, weak in body, 
but strong in spirit. 'Dave' passed 
away in his sleep, leaving the mem- 
ory of a devoted father, a loyal friend, 



Learned Something 

Tbey were looking down into the 
depths of the Grand Canyon. 

"Do you know," asked the guide, 
"that it took mUlions- and millions 
of years for this great abyss to be< 
carved out?" 

"Well, well," ejaculated the trav- 
eler. "I never knew this was a gov- 
ernment job." ■ 



Modest 

Ethel I understand she was very 
modest at her birthday. 

Helen — Well, I should say so; she 
didn't- have half as many candels as 
she ought to have had : on per cake. 

When you advertise you go half 
way. There's a meeting place for the 
seller and the buyer of real estate. 
This meeting place is in the classified 
advertising columns of this paper. 
The owner is represented by his ad- 
vertisement. The prospective buyer 
turns to these columns — and if the 
ad enlists his interst the transaction 
Is under way. 



gal has helped thousands of people 
and it will positively give you relief 
in all ailments mentioned regardless 
of your age or duration of trouble. 
Write for free literature to Dept. F. 
Digestive Chemical Company, St. 
Paul, Minn. Sold in Thief River 
Falls, by Dr. H. B. Newell, Lambert's 
Pharmacy, also leading druggists 
everywhere. 



COMMON W1TCHHAZEL 

FINE FOR SORE EYES 

It is surprinsing how quickly eye 
inflamatiou is helped by common 
witchhazel, camphor, bydrastis, etc., 
as mixed in Lavoptik eye wash. One 
elderly lady, who had been troubled 
with chronic eye inflamation for 
many years, was greatly helped in 
two days. We guarantee a small 
bottle of Lavoptik to help ANY CASE 
of weak, strained or inflamed eyes. 
Aluminum eye cup FREE. F." J. 
Stebbins, druggist. T-l 



Hemstitching 
MRS. McKINNEY 

Scandia Block 

'Phone 252 

Hours! 10> 12; I to 5 



Wm. J. BROWN 

Lawyer 

Formerly County Attorney' 
Marshall County 

Office Over First National l3ank 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



1 



IQC&LMABKE1S 



Hanson & Barzen 

Wheat, No. 1 northern,- per bu. . .$2. 

Wheat, No. 2 northern, per bu. 2. 

Wheat,. No. 3 northern per bu. 2 

Wheat, No, 4 northern, per bu. 2 

Durum wheat, No. 1, per bu. -2. 

Durum wheat, No. 2, perbu. 2 

Durum wheat, No. 3, per bu. 2 

Durum wheat, No.- 4, per bu. 2. 
Oats, per bu. 

Rye, per bu. 2, 

Barley, per bu. .1, 

Flax, No. 1, per bu. . 3. 

Flax, No. 2 perbu. 3. 

Bran, per cwt. 2. 

Shorts, per cwt. 2. 

Tessum Seed, Grain & Supply Co. 



Cracked Corn, per cwt 3. 

\Vl101e corn, per cwt. 3. 

Hay, per bale 1. 

.Middlings, per cwt. ' 2. 

Oil meal 4. 

Thief River Produce Co. 
Hens, light, per lb 
Heavy hens, per lb 
Roosters, per lb 

Turkeys, per lb . . 

Horse hides ^ .03 @ 

Calf hides . 

Horse. hides 
Eggs, per doz. 

T.R. Co-Operative Creamery 
l-lutter, per lb 
Batterfat, per lb 
Milk, per quart 



14 
18 
10 
18 
05 
.15 
04 to .05 
30 



Wait!-- Don't Operate! 

Take'Sto-Ii-gal, a doctor's prescrip- 
tion for dissolving gall stones, and 
complicated sotmach ailments. 

One box gives instant relief in all 
cases of GALL STONES, liver and 
stomach trouble, such as indigestion, 
dyspepsia, chronic appendicitis, gas, 
sour stomach, ulcers, catarrh, paLns 
in stomach and back, constipation, 
etc. Don't wait but get a box of 
Sto-li-gal from your druggist today. 
Price $1. Attention! No fake tes- 
timonials, but positive facts. Sto-li- 



Thief River Tire Shop 

The Home of PENNSLYVANIA TIRES 

Expert Vulcanizing; and Tire Repairing 
Tire Accessories 



v 1 

AV. A. CLAY, PROPRIETOR 

1 1.... 

313 Main Ave. North 



- It Is Just as 

DANGEROUS 

to be without adequate Tornedo insurance as it is 
fire insurance^ In the majority of cases fire losses 
are not total but when a tornado strikes, it means 
a total loss to everything in its path. 

We have on display in our bank actual kodak 
pictures of the Fergus Falls tornado of last year 
. which shows clearly the enormous destruction of 
property in that town. 

Rates Extremely Nominal as follows: 
Dwelling houses and contents S4 per SI, 000 for 3 years 
Mercantile buildings and contents SS per $1,000 for 3 years 

First National Bank 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 
Resources Over One Million Dollars 



WMCff£ST£jL 




Make 'Sure of Enjoying 
Your Shooting 

"VTOW that it's time to be getting 
•*■'.- ready for the hunting season, 
make up your mind not to ex- 
periment in getting equipment for 
shooting. 

Buy Winchester World Standard Guns 
and Ammunition, the kind you can trust. 
Winchester testing and inspection insure 
your satisfaction, and the Winchester 
guarantee backs them up. 

Come in today and look over our 
stock of Shotguns, Rifles, Shells, Car- 
tridges and cleaning supplies. 

Bottem Hardware Co. 
the mNCH0Smi stork 



mvarmaj*± »- tru'muMi 



q J .-. -->•:>&■ -i-^^/^-^^^a 



'^^{^^^•^■.■•.''.■-'■^.-^■ ■. •\. '.: -; .•;■: 




m- 



ie-— ■ 



TUESDAY, JULY 13; 1930 



8^^^^^^5^5^^^^!3^^!^^!^^^^^^ 



THE TRIBUNE 



Page 7 




v*ir 



B 



DO YOU REALIZE 



That Just Three Short Weeks 

Remain 

of The Tribune's Great $3,600 Auto Campaign? 



During That Time You Can Win A Buick "Six" 

Y doing your best work for subscriptions without delay. The great race is going to be won or lost during the next three weeks. The race has 
been so close, all dur ng the initial weeks, that not one worker has attained a sufficiently large vote reserve to feel even mildly certain of victory. 
The race is really just starting— the deadlock which was in force at the end of the First Period forces the decision to come during the last period. 

You have as much chance to win during the next three weeks as anyone. No one has a Very large vote reserve— and no one is far enough 
ahead of you to cause you any fear or uncertainty. It is a fact that you can begin a whirlwind campaign for last minute votes today, continue it 
until the end of the race, 



Isn't it worth the 



July 31st — and come out a winner of the Buick "Six"!! 






effort? Isn't the Buick "Six" worth doing hard work for, for three weeks? .You can't afford NOT to make these last 
weeks your best weeks— for only by so doing can you hope to win — and you are in to win. Get every subscription possible. Call in all the reserves 
upon which you have any claim. Make every friend give you his best possible assistance. And keep working every minute — until the end. 

The last three weeks can win or lose for you, What shall it be? It depends on you and your work for the next three weeks. MAKE THEM 
WINNING WEEKS— DO YOUR BEST WORK NOW!! . ' " . 



You've Got to Work-and Work Hard!— If You Want to Win!! 



Harry Lund, city 

Mrt). Edwin O. Erickson, city 
O. >L. Cfonstrom, city . . . 
Mrs. L. Hermanson, city 
Robert Halvorson, city .. 
Leo Miller, city 



CONTEST STANDING 



District No. One 



District No. Two 



430,000 
433,000 
553,000 

10,000 
280,000 

10,000 



Mrs. Henry Sandee, EFD, city 10,000 

Julius Liden, EFD, city 10,000 

Mrs. Thomas Rowan, city . . 300,000 
Luella Peterson, city ...... 60,000 

■Mrs. H. F. Boreen, city 10,000 



Betty Johnson, Holt 90,000 

Sylvia PiersOn, St. Hi/aire 365,000 
Martha Albin, PSummer . . 403,000 
Ethel Anderson, Wylie .... 95,000 
.Borgliild Berg, Middle River 10,000 
Mrs. E. Singer, Erie 400,000 



Gunder Tvict, polden Valii-y 200.000 
Arthur O.'son, Middle River 10,0*00 
Emma Anderson, Middle River 10.000 
B. O. Xorby. Goodridge ..... 110. 000 
Mrs. C. E. Lundgreu, Viking 00.000 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES AND VOTE 
SCHEDULE 

Votes will Ibe allowed on all pre- 
paid subscriptions to The Tribune. 
No subscriptions will be accepted to 
count votes unless accompanied by 
full amount ia «asn. , 



SECOND PERIOD 

From Jalyjl2th to July 31st, Semi- 
Weekly Tribune, by Mail or Carrier. 



1 Yrs. Sub. 
3 Yrs. Sub. 
5 Yrs. Sub. 



Price Votes 

$ 2.00 5,000 

6.00 25,000 

10.00 50,000 



FIRST GRAND PRIZE-Buick "Six" five passenger touring 
car costing $1,790; SECOND GRAND PRIZE Overland 
"Four" five passenger; touring car, costing $1,090; also nearly one 
thousand dollars in cash awards and ten per cent cash commission to 
all non winners. WHAT PRIZE WILL BE YOURS? 



First Capital. Prize-Buick 'Six' Cost $1,790.00 




Purchased from and on display at 
The People's Auto Company, Thief River Falls, Minn, 



'There is .still time to win. in The 
Tribune's great prize race. There is 
:stil; a chance for you to enter and 
win a wonderful automobile. But 

' you've got to act fast and work 
hard, if you wish to do so. GET. IN 
THE RACE WITH ALL YOUR 
.MIGHT WITHOUT ONEMOMEXT'S 
DELAY — DON'T LET ANOTHER 
HOUR GO BY WITHOUT .SOME 
GOOD WORK WELL DONE FOR 

■ SUBSCRIPTION?!. If you have been 
entered, but Lave not done much 
work— FOLLOW UP YOUR ADVAN- 
TAGE BY DOING EVERY BIT OP 
WORK POSSIBLE DURING THE 
NEPT THREE WEEKS. Make the 
last three weeks win a ear for you — "^ 
BY WORKING -HARD EVERYMIN- 
OTE!! 



For. further information, address 
Manager, Automobile Campaign 

The Tribune 
Office open evenings Phone 33 



( 



O-Vj.'r-.'-WY 



*£& 



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.*■<*& l^^M^-^ii^&Sdii^^&t^^'^iiii if mm. 



P 



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'Page Eight 



PERSONALS 



dien lfcft 



i; 



Mrs. C:irl Ciiri's'on ami chif. 
Saturday for Foniville. X. D.., to visit 
with her parent: 

Bertha Johnson of Badger left for 
Warren Saturday to visit for an in- 
definite time. 

Mrs. Rupert Nelson and -children 
Pi'. St. Hilaire left Saturday morning 
to visit with relatives at Larigdon, 
Xorth Dakota. 

Mrs. A. E. Mnttgou and children 
who lftivc been visiting at the Gust 



Ed. Lar, 



i^-i-Ll^!: 4 I liii2i2rir ; s'v _£ ^ *' -1 -' ^"'-'■^ l ' 



THE TRIBUNE 



w 



TUESDAY, JULY 13, 1920 



Kirby hone ;eft for their home at 
Warren Sa :urday. 

Tom Upstart left for his home at 
Rhoda Sat irday. - ^-— * 

Mrs. Mi tthews, _wlio lias been 
visiting \ ith her- brother W. J. 
Baleiitiue,,left Saturday for her home 
at FordviT*, N. D, 



son and family motored to 
Hazel Friday returning the same 
evening, 

sear Swanso'n returned 
Tuesday e ening from Superior, Wis., 
after spending a few days /visiting 




The Lyceum- 



Today and Wednesday 

The Mary Pickford Company Presents 

MARY PICKFORD 



a 



The Hoodlum" 



The romance of a spoiled heiress who dropped 
through a coal chute to real life and adventure. 

Joe Martin Monkey Comedy 
"Good Ship Rock and tye" 

A First National Attrac ion 

! Matinee, Wednesday it 2:30 



Thursday and Friday 

N DAVIS 



6 it 
I 



Apfil Folly" 



Ajdashing mystery romance 




friends And relatives. ^ 

Misses Thora Ness.aiuL Ida Larson, 
accompanied by. Mrs. -Ed Siverson 
iipeut Friday at Haze'- with Mrs. ! 
Eli as Peterson. £r i 

^nd^na^jB'ermtftrr^liutbon of this 

cit£. left Saturday for tftpokston 

where Uiey will visit^or some time. 

! Miss Mary ;Post'on ldfc Monday 

| morning' for Hibbiug for a *visit with 

relatives. ' ■'"' 

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Bishop are en- 
joying- ' a tivp week's vacation ■ at 
Maple Lake where they are "occupy-. 
ing a fine large cottage with lots of 
room for friends. 

Mr. and . Mrs. J. O. Sether and 
Oi'af Knmstau motored to Jlillsboio, 
X. D., Saturday to spend Sunday at 
the Rev, O. A. Staavas noiue. 

Sam Oen and son, Sigurd mdtored 
over from Park River and spent. Sun- 
day at the Rasmus Oen home. 

Alfred Dybvik left Monday morn- 
ing for Baudette wher>» he is em- 
ployed by the International Xuciber 
company. 

Vance B. Hunter, recruiting officer, 
returned Tuesday morning from Red 
Luke Fails where be has been attend- 
ing to business. 1 

Miss Ruth Dybvik left Monday 
morning for Baudette, vvhere she 
will visit for an indefinite time* with, 
her brother, Harry. 

Miss Edith Craven left Saturday 
morning for Bemidji, after visitng 
in the city a week with friends and 
relatives. Miss Craven expects to 
be employed in Bemidj'.. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew .Hunugrud 
were pleasantly surprised at their 
home last Friday evening. Only the 
most "intimate friends of Mr. and 
Mrs.. Buringru.! \\j i :-z present. A de- 
lightful time vi- s n-pnrted by all. 

Rev. George Larson returned Mon- 
day evening from Walker where he 
attended the dedication of a new 
church. 

Mrs. R. J. Meadows arrived Sun- 
day morning from Chicago to spend 
a few weeks visiting at the home of 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 0. L. Bak- 
ken. 

Esther Warner who has been em- 
ployed at Lokeu's Department store 
left Saturday to spend a few weeks 
vacation with her parents at Holt. 

Mable Shefei'and of Holt arrived 
in this city Saturday to. spend a few 
days visiting at the home of Rev. 
Xyborg. 

Mi.ises Meta KilnmL Evangeline 
Burns, Lucile Burns. Marian and^Eila 
Miller and Messrs. Oscar Paulson and 
Francis Burns motored to. Itasca 
State Park Saturday. ■ They expect 
to enjoy a week's outing. 

J. J. Vorachek. Miss Anna Vora- 
chek. and Mrs. Hodek motored to 
Itasca State Park Sunday morning 
to spend a few days. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pam' Xybakken are 
spending a few days in tbi- city visit- 
ing at the home of, the for- 
mer's parents. Mrs. Xybakken was 



} formerly Miss Vera Kitzenberg. 



i 



• Alfred Haugen has resumed bis 
dutigs at the, Oen .Mercantile com- 
pany after a few days vacation. 

Mr. and Mrs. P. Bejone.of Lisbon, 
X. D., are spending the week visit- 
ing, a c the Rasmus Oen home. 
| Jordan Penny, " Derby Anderson 
I Rolf Rasmusson; -Aivin Holzknecbt 
' and Archie Dahl , motored to Crooks- 
I ton Saturday where they spent the 
I day taking in the fair. They return- 
: ed to this eity.Sunday_;_... 
j Miss Vivian Tripp;pf -Baudette ar- 
' rived in this' cit'^ifonday to be the 
| giiest of Mrs. <£-_ S,(- jStroonsou for a ! 
j few days. ,-vW.V' "* :V " ; ! 

j "- Mrs. Rierson Of' Holt is spending 1 
i a few days in this city visiting with 
Mrs. Lufkin,- | 

Mary and Alice Mui'dum. who have- 
been visiting the past month at their, 
parental home in this city, left Mon- j 
fWy fifViifaoon for |?ntfso, . X 1 . DJ, . 
where they are emplyed. j 

.Miss Karen Knutson left Monday, 
afternoon for Fargo, X. D„ where sly? J 
will visit with friends and relatives i 
f r about a week. Miss Knutson wilt ! 
take in the fair at the same time. ; 
John Xess and family arrived from j 
Spokane. Wash., via auto Saturday ■ 
and will visit at the Ed Xess home: 
for a week. They, were joined in ' 
Hendrum by Oi'e Rogness and fam- '■ 
i'iy who spent Sunday at the Ed Xess j 
home. ... ] 

Miss- Beatrice ifale of Mcintosh ! 
arrived in this city Monday evening: 
to visit a few days with her sister, ' 
Mrs, J. X. Xesse. \ 

Miss Anna Liemers left Monday j 
evening for Gleuwtfod to spend a few . 
days with her fc , sister. Mrs. Funned, ; 
euroute to San Francisco where she ; 
will spend the remainder of the sum- . 
mer with 'her sister. Mi's. Kueffer. ; 
Miss Onata Stoppel left Monday j 
evening for Alexandria where she i 
will spend a few week's vacation \ 
visiting at her parental home. *j 

Mrs. H. P. Fisher, who has spent ; 
the past inonth visiting with her sis- ! 
ter. Mrs. T. P. Anderson, left Sat- j 
urday morning for Cyrus where she { 
will visit for an indefinite period with ■ 
her niece. j 

Bernard Knudsen left Monday eve. , 
iting for Minneapolis where he will! 
spend a few days attending to busi- \ 
ness matters. •[ 

G. Halvorson left Sunday evening j 
for Dumunt. where be "\*iil attend to 
business matters. 



The Best of A 

80\fears Experience 

in this New 

Small 

Ideal ii ^~ T - J 



TV. 22*3* Weal 



. 



THE jaccamolate J manufacturing experience of over 
three-quarters o ' a century— and the judgment of 
p over -20,000 Idtal owners — Is back of the [new, 

' ;*mall 22 x 36 Ideal thresher. ' 

You know the record and reputation of the larger s&es' 
'of the Ideal— there's n^ farming community that hasrrt its 
Ideal outfits with (heirj satisfied customers. When we were 
called upon to buildj a smaller size separator, we c idn't 
Just "turn one oat"— we built along the same lines as the 
i Ideal, determined that our small = threshers would be 
.leaders in their class just as are die larger. 

So in the small as well as the larger Ideals yon wflll 
rind those features that mean the ■ difference between a 
•toe" and a "guesswork" job.- Ideal thresher owners win 
tell yon that 

Pn nr n ing , or ' cylinder - winding ■ fa i unknown In the 
Ideal— because the Ideal is designed on the principle of 
a steady, even flow or - utrmw through Ota machine from 
the time it enters the cylinder unto, free from all rain, it 
leaves through the stacker. ' - 

First of all, we placed the Ideal grates exactly right in 
rretstJon to the cylinder. '. Then we designed the Ideal 
ening slatted rake to take the straw from thai cyiindei, 
carry it to the straw rack.' Result— more grate sutfact i 
a srmdy even flow of straw, making choking ' 



' impos ih] 



and 
and 

lie. 



Shaking alone, wasn't a guarantee of complete separa* 
tion,so we put sets of lifting fingers on the straw rack,' 
that tear the straw open— nike it— beat it from beneatbj 
Result— complete separation and no-waste. 

Then, to take careof the increased capacity due to these 
inventions and to make the Ideal do a perfect job of clean- ' 
ing, we put in extra chaffer area. The chaffer in the clean- 
ing, shoe, with the adjustable sieve and our special system 
of wind control, guarantee a perfect job of cleaning with- 
out waste. Result— the kind of cleaning that gets "tk» 
dockage" at the elevator. * 

Such' construction shows why the small 22 z 36 iruT 
handle up to 600 trasheb.of wheat in a day's run— 
the 2S x +4 up to WOO- bushels. 

The Ideal is built in five sizes— 22 x 38, 28 x M, 28 x 48 
32x52 and 36x60— standard in design and construction, and 
meeting all needs, from 
the man who owns ms 
own power and wants 
, todoms own threshing, 
to the custom thresher. 

There's an Ideal In 
vour neighborhood. 

Tk» fAoTsnfeaet 

Olf-DUJJlijJBj 

OUPatt Tractor U 
mmiltin$ixntofU 
se ej y tvu H t ml . 



Bakke. Thiof River Fats, Minn. 

WANTED TO BUY— LATHES OB 
Hisses used bicycle. Must be in 
good condition. Phone 500. 30-2 

FOB SALE — 7 COWS AXD 3 
spring calves. May" consider team 
of young horses or car; Tandrup 
Saltvedt, Highliimliug: :!0-4pd 

f.OST — BETWEEN KED LAKE 
Fal.'s and Tliief River Falls, childs 
black silk coat on Saturday, July 
10. Finder return to Gazette office, 
Red Lake Fall's for reward. 

ROOM FOR RENT AT 423 MAIN 
avenue. 30-3pd 

HAY FOB SALE. ADDRESS E. 
Blankenherg. Henry. S. D. 36-2 
Jelly. - Preserve. Vegetable and 

Reiish iabels — all ready to stick on 

the jars — at Laird's. 

Spring Broilers 

WE HAVE A LIMITED XI MBER 
of excellent spring broilers for 
quick disposal — mill; fed — place 
your order now. Phone 3::r>4 y)-tf 

tJOOD YOIW'U HORSE FOR SALE 



cheap if taken at once. Inquire 
Benson Barber Shop 2t 

HAY STUMI'AfiE /in SEVERAL 
quarters near Cn/ih-iiliri. for rent. 
First & Peoples Stale- l'..in:< :;"i-tf 



USED CARS FOR SALE 
-Buick Mcd'i ('. 2.~i.. overhauled, 
repainted and new cord tires $700. 

Ford, late model, equipped with 
shock absorber and Yale lock ?4.'50. 
Marion deHvery car. sacritice price 
$300. Empire Speedster, n wire 
wheels, new tires, a sacritice. at SS00 

Staude tractor attachment for 
Ford. Brand new, pulls two plows 
this attachment sells for $230. Our 
price for quick fcrtle $130.00. 

Overland ""•. Overhauled, new- 
bat [cries and a bargain ar S473.00. 
Studeliaker 6. overhauied- 1017 mod- 
el. Car traveled 'less than GOO milvs 
$S7">. 

These cars can be seen at tho'E. 
C. 1'arsous Auto Co.. Warren. Minn. 




ADVANCE-RUMELY 



Peoples 



^ ; :4ft^j fefeAJ 




A. W. SWEDENBERG 

Physician, and Surgeon 

Eyes Tested and Glasses Stipplied 

Special Attention Paid to 

Eyes, Ears. 'Nose am! Throat 

Phone 350 
First National Bank Buildliitr 




Bear these two words iu mind. Become aiquninu'd wit h 
them. In them lies the hope of rq ief and rosturation ro ihe Ul 
and suffering. 



It's not many years since Chiropructie wa; 
today thoustnd.s who were sick and ailin-ir 
Health and are happy witnesses to the merits 
ern drusless way to health. The haiidfiu of p: 



dis 



jvcie 



1. Yet 
re restored to 
of this the nuid- 
meers h;s ^n. 



own 



Classified Wants 



LOST ON ROAD BETWEEN OI-UAND 
Forks and Thief River Falls via 
Pembina trail, one 33x4 Diamond 
cord tire, (spare) with tire eover 
and rim. Reward paid for ii- re- 
turn. O. Tessum. SG-2 
.Telly. Pivserve, Vegetable and 

Reiish abels — ail ready to stick on 

the jars — at Laird's. 

FOR SALE — THRESHING OUTFIT 
complete for work. Reeves engine 
and Reeves separator- 3G-G0 with 
garden city wing feeder. Engine 
is a 40-80 gas tractor with 400 
gallon gas tank » lounted on truck, 
8 bottom snible pVows. also brack- 
ets, a good outfit for someone that 
wants to go threshing. For par- 
ticulars write or call on me. B. J. 



until there are now nearly 10,(100 Chiropractors 
practicing in the face of the bitterest criticism ;i 
opposition that ever hindered a new and worthy 
praetic Live- and advances becansf it is :igin : It 
suits it obtains are the best arguments in its.fav 



sin- 



Chiropractic demonstrate 
disease and invariably it i 
tific adjustments, without the use 
Chiropractor corrects these defects 
cure. Through 



me 



that there i 

found in Ihr 

r drujrs i 
tin! Nature 



> fully 



fur a I 



V.y 

knifi 
eft' 



t-- 



t he 
■ the 




the percenta'ge of restorations is "so large that -the necessity 
for the employment of other health methods becomes in- 
significant. . It is equally as effective for men. women and 
children.. It is the. HOPE for all suffering IIi;m:ini;y. In- 
formation" gladly given. 

T.M.Kolberg,D.C 

Palmer Graduate 

Oyer First National Bank 

Phone 107 Thief River Falls 



Chiropractic 



Kl-RO-PRAK-TIK 

THE SCIENCE THAT MAKES PEOPLE WELL AND HAPPY 

YOU NEED NOT BE SICK 

Chiropractic Adjusts the Cause of Disease 

The Spine and its Relation to Disease 




AFFECTIONS OF any of the 
following parts mar bo canKd 
by nerves IniDintiedatthe spina 
by a subluxared vertebra: 

BRAIN 

•EYES 

EAR3 

NOSE 

THROAT 

ARMS 

HEART 
LUx\GS 
LIVER' 

STOMACH 

PANCREAS 

SPLEEN 
^ KIDNEYS 
^ SMALL BOWEL 
** LARGE BOWEL 

GENITAL ORGANS 

THIGHS & LEGS '. 



SPINE OF HAS 



Note the above Ulosfration.thovs a nerve that 
ia normal and one that ia '•pinched" There is 
hut one positive result for the latter — Disease 



Going directly to the cause of the 
majority of so-called diseases is the 
reason of Chiropractic efficiency . as 
a drugless health agent; that is why 
adjustments benefit you when all 
"treatment methods" have failed. 

Investigation costs nothing and 
means health and happiness. 

Chiropractic Eventually 

—Why Not Now 

L. V. Johnson 

Chiropi actor 

Office in Scandia Block 

Hours Phone 213 

10 to 12; 2 to 4 

Outside Calls by Appointment 



j^^j|aa»«ni- : i^;i>'^. 



L 



^^^-J-aaa:-j.-Ss'ry/.i. i, :,r. : . ■ ■ 



w 



•^qf^tem&^vgt^m*^ 



VOL 20 No. 37 



SHORT TI^ 
UNTIL v ilR 



L ettf '.. v^ii provide 



•< ,„ ft \ ^ - ' fficates us tlxby become due. The 



itf* - ; 



L..J ..... 



GATES OPEN 



BIGGER AND BETTER THAN 

EVER IS THE SLOGAN OF 

DIRECTORS 



Just a trifle more than two weeks 
remain until the opening day of the 
Pennington count}- fair arjd the fair 
board are working mighty hard to 
get everything in readiness for this 
annual event. They have made all 
necessary arrangements for taking 
care of the l'argest crowd in the 

■wVrstory of the association and it is felt 
that this year's attendance will far 
exceed that of 'any previous year. 
The exhibits are ai'so expected to be 
better than usual this ; year due to 
the wonderful crop prospects and 
from every hand is heard the ex 
pression that the cpunty fair this 
year is certain to be the best ever and 
that no cause for complaint will be 
given in the presentation of the shows 
and free atractions. 

Art Williams, who is considered 
■the most fearless of all flyers, will 
be here every day of the fair and 
win give two exhibitions on each 
day. He is the man who walks all 
over the plane while it is high in 
mid air, dropping in a parachute 
■while the plane is five- thousand feet 

i iu the air. He is rated as one of 
the big attraction of all county fairs 
and has been givting entire satis- 
faction wherever he has appeared. 
Lieut. Larrabee has also bcen'secured 
for the fair and will give some 
thrilling exhibitions in the air. He 
has one act that is called the fnllng 
leaf. In this act he lets ail "control 
of his 'plane go and drops from a 
height of 5,000 feet, slighting his 
plane while hut eighty feet from the 
earth. He also has a I'nrge number 
of thrilling acts that will be given 
for the. benefit of those who attend 
this annual event of Pennington 
county. 

■ ' The flying circus also is scheduled 
for every day of the fair and their 
act is calculated to raise the hair on 

.the head of a wooden man. They have 
stunts' that have seldom been tried 
before and their act is called one of 

* the best that the people of this state 
have been fortunate in seeing. They 
•carry a large crew of people with 
them and give everything that could 
be hoped for in this line of . amuse- 
ment and then a little more. They 
are booked for all three days and 
from all indications and reports they 
are well worth seeing. 

Many more acts and special fea- 
^ure>j are to.be booked and every- 

" cuing points to a wonderful and in- 
teresting three days when the big 
Pennington cpunty fair gets in full 
•swing. ' > 



JUDGE HOLDS 
INJUNCTION IN 
PAVING INVALID 



SO DECIDED AT WARREN ON 

WEDNESDAY OF THIS WEEK 

—CITY TO PAVE 



Judge Andrew Grindei'and has de- 
cided against the paving injunction 

* signed by a few of the citizen's of 
the city asking that all work on the 
paving program mapped out by the 
^ity^for his year be held, up. The 
decision was reached by Judge 
^^jndeland at his home in Warren 
and -the city couneil are now going 
ahead 'with the preliminary work of 

" paving. It is not known how much 
■of the work can be accomplished this 
year, but an effort will be made to 
get in action on the work at once 

. and if possible to complete as much 
as possible before cold weather sets 
in. The opinion of the judge is as 
follows : 

- "Under said Chapter 65 the city 
has the power to issue certificates for 
the payment of the 'whole or part of 
said improvement', and section nine 
thereof provides that the "'amount of 
any such certificates at any time out- 
standing shall not be included in de- 

.. termining any such municipality's net 
•indebtedness under the provisions of 
any applicable Taw.' 

"Prom a fair and reasonable con- 
struction of said .Chapter 65, Laws 
1919, the court is 'of the opinion that 
the eity can Issue the cerificates in 
payment of the city's proportionate 

_iShare of the cost of the mprovement 
'■ jvell as hat which is "to :be borne 
Dy special assessment against .abut- 
ing property. Hence the city can 
raise by such certificates a sufficient 
amount to pay the entire cost of the 
improvement and pay 'the contract 
price. complained of. The said Chap- 

-«r 65 further, provides that ■ the city 



"The cour 



injunction is 
the restraiiiii 
aside." 



The cars we 
by Secretary 
mereial Club 
dent of thte 
and piloted nto town, 
accompanied 



jj f sfi^pjp^j^ 



BrWaKXj*uAjMj]-u>.i*j.-i-4.:.j.*. 




1m -£SOj, 






A/ 



THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY, JULY 16, 1920 



Official Paper of 'Pennington County 



funds to meet the certi. 



'. court can see no vahd reason presem 
ed by the pit adings whereby the city 
cannot apprc priate from the general 
revenue fund of said city each year a 
certificate falls due a sufficient 
amount, plus the amounts received by 
the city for special assessments, to 
meet the cerl ificates as they fall' due, 
and this may cover a period of 20 
years, if the < :ity so desires, and there 
the pleadings which 
:e to the court that the 
jnabi'e to meet the cer- 



nothing in 
would indica 
city will be 
tiflcates as they fall due. 



is of the opinion that 
the complaint fail.-; to state a cause 
of action am , the application for an 
therefore denied and 
g order vacated and set 



Booster? in City 



THIRTY AUTOMOBILE LOADS OF 

BOOSTERS HIT CITY AT 

NOON TODAY 



In. the negiborhood of thirty auto- 
mobiles vlsitc d thi s city at noon to- 
day, loaded with boosters from Grand 
Porks boostii g for the Grand Forks 
fair which :s to he held at that 
pi'aee this month. 



1'"""' ""- "'"'" ' 
Th 
sli 
— ^t.,..., ...... ,,.'d ii 



ere met north of town 
Scott Laird of the Com- 
uid Geo. Streeter, presi- 
Pennington Auto Club 
They were 
by a band and before 
lunch the band gathered at the in- 
hird and LaBrfie 
sboi| concert. The 
in the city on sched- 
ule time and with the blowing of 
horns and other noises routed out 
the greater share of the population 
on their wayl into town. 

Another booster excursion is due 
in this city on JulyTJlst when the 
St. Paul boosters arrive. They are 
iluniing -by special ti<ain and wili 
be accompanied by the Minnesota 
State hand. I'liey will remain 'in the 
city for a little more than an hour 
before contin ling oh their way south 
ward. 



A r 3 THIS IS 10 JOKE!! 



Dance rollowing Concert 
There will be a big dance held at 
thte auditori ini next . Wednesday 
evening foi'lo ling *he concert by the 
Million Doila • band at Squaw. Point. 
The band wi I furnish the music for 
the dance aid it is expected there 
will be a large attendance. 



PETITION FILED 
MOIfDAY FOR 
TWO DITCHES 



BOTH ARE 
WEST or 



TO BE LOCATED 
THE CITY AND 



MEAN BIG IMPROVEMENT 



A petition for ' two large ditches 
came up for 1 learing on. Monday eve- 
ning and the! plans for the . work 
were turned over to Engineer Irving 
E. 0.uist. O.j A. Naplin acted in the 
capacity of attorney for the petition- 
ers and drew up the petition. Noth- 
ing of special' importance was done 
at the meeting Monday evening other 
than the preliminary work, and the 
meeting was jidjourued until Tuesday 
evening of next week. 

The two proposed ditches, numberh 
6S and 69, are both to be established 
west of towhl Ditch 68, i s to begin 
at the state [road, four miles, west 
and run sraitht south five miles, 
emptying into county ditch number 
one. Ditch 69 is to begin one miie. 
south in the town of Sanders and 
also run south, emptying into county 
ditch numbed one. This ditch is to 
be one mile east of ditch 68. 

The meeting to be held Tuesday 
evening is to determine whether or 
not the project shall be started and 



carried thru, 
present time 



expected there will be more or less 



opposition, 
county ditch 



This is true of every 
that is placed and it 



is felt this project will prove no ex- 



ception to th 
interested in 



> rule. However those 
he establishing of these 



ditches are prepared to push the pro- 



ject thru to 
they will' be 



the finish and believe 
able to carry. the same 



thru to a successful conclusion. 



and become a 



Saturday anc 




No opposition at the 
has appeared but it is 



Bib! s Chautauqua 
Those who have been at the meet- 
ings are com ng again ; are you not 
coming? M you understand the 
Scandinavian language you should 
come and hea t the following subjects 
on Friday ami Sunday evenings re- 
spectively : "The Saint's Inheritance," 
Shall the Ji ws return to Palestine 



nation again?" 



ing every- evming at 7.45, 



Meet- 
except 



Monday evenings. ; 



Jelly. Preserve, Vegetable and 
Bei&h labels- -all ready to stick on 
the jars-^o.t I aird's 




Father Dies 

Wm. Michelet left last evening 
for Minneapolis where he was called 
on account of the ' death of his 
father. The news has been expected 
for some time as Mr. Michelet has 
been iu poor health most of the 
summer. 



Married. 

The M. E. parsonage was the 
scene of a quiet wedding on Satur- 
day last. July 10. when Ormond H. 
Eaton and Miss Mary G. Johnson 
were united in the bonds of matri- 
mony by Re,v. Jno. B. Smith. The 
ceremony took pi'aee in the presence 
of Chris Berg and Miss Esther John- 
son. The contracting parties hail 



MUST NOT SLOW 
UP IN RACE FOR 
TWO BIG PRIZES 



WORKERS IN TRIBUNE'S $3,600 
AUTOMOBILE CAMPAIGN URG- 
ED TO WORK HARD 



^ 



"No." said he. "Its mighty hard 

work — and. anyhow — what's the use 

from Goodhue county and their mar- of keeping on working when I know 



riage will be 
friends in Red 



surprise 
Wing and 



to their 
vicinity. 



Take River Trip 



ALL PHYSICIANS AND NURSES 

TAKE PICNIC UP RIVER THIS 

AFTERNOON 



CONCERTS BY 
BIG BAND SURE 
TO PLEASE ALL 



PENNINGTON 
CATTLE TAKE 
ALL RIBBONS 



NOTED AHLLION DOLLAR BAND GUERNSEYS FROM THIS COUNTY 



HOLDS ALL RECORDS FOR 
BEING TIP-TOP 



Every one wants to know how 
Haroi'd Baehnian's band camel to be 
known as' the Million Dollar Band. 
Mr. Bachman tells the story as fol- 
lows: 

"It was on Christmas day, 191 
that the jtl6th Engineer's band was 
doing its/best to cheer up the lonely 
soldiers df the 41st Division, who 
were spending their first Christmas 
away from home. General Hunter 
J. Liggett was the guest of honor at 
a celebration for the men at which 
this band furnished most of the 
music. Noting the cheering effect 
which the music had on thte men, 
the General paid*close attention to 
he program which Director Bachman 
had arranged, . especially for Christ- 
mas day. At the close of one number 
General Liggett's chief of staff come 
to the band and after presenting the 
compliments of the General to .the di- 
rector, said: 'General' Liggett wishes 
me to inform you that in all his 
forty-one- years experience h)e has 
never heard a better band in the 
American army." This compliment 
must have inspired the band mem- 
bers to even greater efforts, for after 
the next number General Liggett 
turned to Colonel Walker, commander 
of the 116th Engineers, and exclaim- 
ed, "Colonel, that band is worth a 
million dollars to the United States 
army." 

The concert to be given July 21, 
at Squaw Point by this band prom- 
ises to be a hummer. The price of 
admission is only 50 cents for adults 
and 25 cents for children. 



WIN SWEEPSTAKES 
OUTSIDEi FAIRS 



AT 



Pass Thru City 
Mrs. W. B. Whities and son, Rob- 
ert, "of Iowa City, Iowa, passed thru 
the city last night enroute to Detroit 
Mrs. Whities and BDbert • are well 
known in Thief Biver Falls where 
they have visited on many occasions. 
They went to Los Angeles in No^ 
veinber and were just returning via 
the North coast and Canadian route. 
Doctor Whities will join his family 
at Detroit, where they own a cottage 
and grounds, for a six week's vaea- 
ion. 



Large Sweet Clover Acreage 

County Agent McCann advises us 
that 24,000 pounds- of sweet clover 
seed was sowed in the county this 
year or a trifle- oyer 2,000 acres. This 
points toward : more than $200,000. 
An even greater benefit will accrue 
to the land by reason of planting the 
crop. Remember, it improves thte 
quality of the land, shades the ground 
and clears up foul weeds* - The roots 
left in the ground are a great ferti- 
lizer, ten,tp twenty tons of roots per 
acre from a seed crop remain as fer- 
tilizer. : Sweet clover will pay inter- 
est, taxes and'the mortgage debt It 
will pay' for the. farm and make a 
poor ; farm .a-jgopd. farm.;/ " "• 

It j^s^ljoadye^ltee in The Tribune. .: 



Leonard Houske, State Dairy and 
Food Inspector has written in to the 
Farm Bureau office in Thief River 
F4jls giving the results of the pre- 
miums awarded on the Guernseys 
from Pennington county at the North 
Dakota state fair.. Kildee, of Ames, 
did the judging and both grand cham- 
pionships were awarded to the Guern- 
seys of Pennington county, in com- 
petition with herds shown at the 
National Dairy Show last year and 
which will be shown again this year. 

F. B. Conklin won the grand 
champion on his cow Cif . H. C. 
Woolson on his sire, Robert's Boy of 
Minnesota. Mr. Conklin won first on 
cow three years old and first on 
cow two years old also on senior 
heifer calf and senior y earing Dull*. 
Mr, Woolson won first and senior 
grand champion on aged bull, first on 
junior buil calf and second on cow 
in a class of strong competition with 
herds from the North Dakota Agri- 
cultural college and three others 
from Montana. 

• Pennington county Guernsey's 
have taken ail premiums at the other 
fairs on the show circuit ' in - Ada, 
Fertile and Crookston. They are 
now showing iu # Fargo, and will make 
the Grand Forks fair during the week 
01! July 19. This exhibition is mak- 
ing Pennington county famous for 
its purebred ' Guernseys and the ex- 
hibitors from this pi'aee have had 
.oppotunities to sell every head of 
stock that they the exhibiting. 



All the physicians and nurses of 
the eity were absent from duty this 
afternoon when a large picnic party 
was made up and they all' hiked to 
the river, edge where launches and 
boats were waiting and an excursion 
up the Red River was made. The 
party went up the river about five 
mijes and then . landed, enjoying a 
picnic supper. The wives and fam- 
ilies of the physicians ai'so accom- 
panied the party and there were 
twenty-five at the dock when the 
full party assembled. 

The physicians provided fofj 
emercency iu case of an accident by 
leaving their office gin's in charge 
and also by having a launch ready 
at the river edge in case any of 
them were, needed. For the first time 



1 can't win anything?" 

This contestant was discouraged 
— mighty discouraged. Things had 
gone wrong — subscriptions upon 
which he had couuted had been re- 
fused him or given to other workers, 
friends upon w-hom he had looked for 
help had refused to give it. And, 
all in ali' — things looked pretty bad. 

Admittedly — there wasn't that de- 
gree of smoothness which is always 
to be hoped for. But, what was the use 
of wanting to give up the race, simply 
because one day's work had been met 
with obstacle after obstacle? Would 
you ever see a business man or a 
farmer sell his property at a miuious 
figure, simply because one day's work 
or one mouth's effort had gone for 
nothing? Would you ever find any 
sensible man or woman really to give, 
up everything they had gained, sim-' 
ply because one little project had 
failed? 

Of course you would not— and the 
contestant himself, was losing a 
mighty valuable investment, a mighy 
worth-whii'e reserve, when hi' thus 
si- wed up, discouraged and dis- 
heartened. 

You can't afford to slow up or 10 
lag behind in The. Tribune's great 



: ?o,«0U automobile campaign. You 
in the history of the city there was : can't afford to give up or cease your 
not a doctor within a short distance | hard efforts, simply because there 
in' case anything serious turned up. come times when things don't go 
On no occasion in the past has this' right. It's the worker who keep's go. 
ocdrred, bd_t with the piVeau.lions j ing in the face of defeat and rebuff 
taken by the city physicians, with i and discouragement . who's going to 
a view of being reached in an emer- j win — it's the worker with strong 
gency. the city was 1 amply protected i heart anil will and determination who 
and continued the even tenor of its ! will ultimately eome out of the race 
way, alt' unaware that they were ] in the lead. 



without 
arily. 



medical protection tempor- 



NEW HOME OF 
BANK NEARING 
COMPLETION 



FIRST AND PEOPLES STATE 

BANK TO HAVE MODEL 

BANKING HOME 



Play Grygla Sunday 
The local ball team goes to Grygla 
Sunday and will meet that team in 
what promsies to be one of the fast 
games pf the season. The Gryga 
team have T)een playing some mighty 
good ball and it is expected the game 
on Sunday will draw a large crowd 
of rooters from ali sections. Several 
of the local fans plan to accompany 
the team from this place and if root- 
ing will do any good they expect to 
put the local team across the plate 
for victory. 



To Entertain Boosters 

At the Merchants meeting held 
Wednesday evening, a committee 
for the entertainment of the many 
boosters that are coming here from 
St. Paul oh July 31 was appointed 
and plans for the booster trip were 
also made and arrangements for the 
perfection of the tour were taken up 
and disenssed. Those appointed for 
the entertainment of the St. Paul' 
boosters are F. H: Herrick, chairman, 
E. O. Mogensen and L. L,' Cohen. 
The committee for thte booster tour 
to be made on July 27 is, Geo. Loken 
chairman, E. O. Mogensen and W. 
A. Hall. ■ ... '-.-- . 



Zion Lutheran Church 

George Larson, Pastor. , 
Services in city at 11 a. m. Mission 
fest at Sam-. Groveh's grove Sunday 
afterndott;at 2 vpi m'; ] ,.1 a. •' - ■'" 



The new home for the First & 
People's . State bank is fast nearing 
completion and if nothing unfor- 
seen occurs the new building will be 
.ready for occupance in the course of 
a few weeks. The delay caused by 
the non-arriva'i of stone for the 
front has been overcome and' all ma- 
terials necessary for the completion 



If you at 
tinie to ilo 
race in the 
.Bllick '"Six" 



of the building arc now on the f them 
ground, and the work of completing 
the new home of the bank is being 
rushed. 

The bank is to be equipped with 
the very latest- in modern banking your best work, 
facilities. An extra fine piece of ' 
workmanship in the way of a vault 
is installed find not ling like it short 
of the larger places has been placed 
in the smaller communities. The 
door of the vault is two inches thick 
and is made of soi'id steel. 

A special feature of the new in- 
stitution will be the modern conven- 
iences that are being installed facil- 
itate the work of the empoyees.' Ev- 
erything that is known to modern 
banking is to be in readiness when 
the new home is opened to the pub- 
lic. One feature is a special room 
which is buii't for the adding ma- 
chines aione. This will do away 
with much unnecessary noise in the 
bank proper and will add to the effi- 
ciency of the entire force. 

The building now occupied by the 
bank has been purchased by the 
Walker-Gesefl Land Company, who 
are to take possession as soon as the 
bank, vacates. The building now oc- 
cupied by the Land company has 
been leased by the Laird Specialty 
Shop. The building now used by 
the Laird shop is part of the. build- 
ing leased by the J. C. Penney Com- 
pany who are to open a large store 
in the Meehan block. 

These changes are notable for the 
fact that it is a step forward in the 
business life of the city dnd mean 
that the town is progressing in 
spite of the high cost of all building 
materials and labor. 



Work — hard work — Work without 
cessation — is the omy.key to siu.-eess.- 
And you can't do winning work when 
all the time you are oonviio-e-l that 
you arc losing — that yotir're hot iu 
the race — that you can't win. When 
you begin to believe that the rare 
holds nothing for you bat failure — 
you have lost. ■ ^'' y' 

But ifyvou keep on working. In-ui 
in your determination to win the 
Biiick "Six" or nothing — they can't 
beat you. All that it will take lo 
win is constant work and good work 
from now to the end of the ra<-e — 
two weeks from toniorrow night. 

So — put ill your very hardest effort 
froih-nnw to the end. Don't let well- 
meaning friends discourage yon or 
dishearten you- — don't let ilit'.e ob- 
stacles and little deift*ats persuade 
you to slow up. Remember — you've 
not having one trouble that isn't also 
coming- to everyone -of your rivals. 
To every worker comes the same 
sorf.s of troubles — -and it's only the 
exceptional worker, th"* winning 
worker, who can keep on iu spite - 



in to win — now i- the 
so.- If you are in the 
hope of winning the 

■now is thv time to do 



Meeting July 24th 

The Minnesota Public Health as- 
sociation will hold a meeting at the 
Auditorium in this city on Saturday, 
July .24/ Dr. Pearce, child special- 
ist of St. Panl, will be present and 
conduct' the clinic. AH mothers are 
invited to be present" and bring the 
children to this clinic. 



Go ahead ami work with ail your 
might and win ! I 



Locate at Santa Anna .. 

Word comes from California to the 
effect that Dr. Ganibe.ll has invested 
in a fine home and twenty acres of 
orange grove property right in* the 
city limits of Santa Anna. California. 
The family wii'f move there from their 
present home in Los Angeles in a few 
weeks, and the^ doctor wilf establish 
himself iu practice. Doctor Gambell 
and his fine family honor any town 
by their presence. The doctor ser- 
ved nearly two years in the Russian 
War Zone in Red Cross work. He 
will enjoy his new home and settled 
down Kituatifiu. No finer 'fainiRy 
ever lived in iriiief IJiver Falls. No 
finer family/niever ived in Santa 
Anna. 



Allow. Large Sum 
'The sum of $25,000 was allowed 
last Monday by the State Board of 
Relief to care for expenses incurred in, 
the distribution of relief among flood 
sufferers by State. Appraiser Scott 
Laird last winter aud Spriog. 

Mr. Laird went to St. Paul Sunday 
night aud met with the board in spe- 
cial session Monday morniag, sub- 
mitting his estiina.e of the probable 
total amount which will have been 
spent when alt of the bills aud seed 
grain notes have been filed, audited 
and allowed. The figures brought 
the total up to $^00,000 and as only 
$175,000 had previously been allot- 
ted the above action was necessary. 

No additional allotments are be- 
ing made by Mr. Laird to flood suf- 
ferers as some have thought from 
reading accounts in some of the- 
newspapers . wherein it was stated . 
that an additional' $25,000 had been 
appropriated. ; 



-*A:i' -i'^J'Miflri^ 



y^s4s <'^T^>f ^-^S | v 1 ?"is ; :|Aii;' I ii"-;<- ■'•"-'' 



I 



.—I 



rXTlri 



i 



^^f^^^l^ - vr 




Page Two 



Automobile 



"LABOR WINS ALL,"— Tacitus 



This column conducted by Auto- 
mobile Campaign Department* The 
Tribune. 



A LITTLE ADVICE 

Diligence is the mother of 
good luck, and God gives all 
things to industry. — Franklin. 

Trust yourself, rather than 
others. — Emerson. 

Always -be cheerful! It pays 
in its effect; on the customer, 
and in its effect on yourself.. 
The man who believes he is go- 
ing to succeed, will find his 
customers and liis friends 
gradually coming- to believe the 
same thing. — Stanley. 

The trouble with the aver- 
age salesman who is a faUure 
is that he doesn't 'stop to think, 
and does not learn by. his "mis- 
takes or his successes. He who 
will apply the lessons which 
experience has taught him, to 
the carrying oUt of his work, 
will find it easy jto get ahead. 
— Wood worth. }■ 

Men can only improve their 
circumstances by improving 
themselves. The ■ man who 
does not shrink from temporary 
dlsaon^forts or< difficultiies, so 
long as tliey aid him to ac- 
complish his object, will sure- 
i'y reach the goal upon which 
his heart is set. — Allen, 

Any salesman,- to be success- 
ful, must cultivate the art of 
ciose observation, and the abil- 
ity to reach a decision from 
,the facts observed will- come to 
Mm.- — F-rom "Success and the 
Man." 

Not one- really greet man has 
achieved success except by 
coming over a path of hard- 
ships and disappointments. It 
is because ho has had the 
courage to keep on in spite of 
difiiculties and. rebuffs and 
.disappointments, that he has 
'succeeded. — Greene. } 

Hard wprk — continuous, nev- 
er-ceasing — is the bni'y royal 
road to success — and it- may. be 
followed by one men as well 
as by another. — Addison. 



Why pay hard-earned cash for an 
automobile? Join The Tribune's 
gieat automobife campaign with all 
your might, work bard .and work 
constantly, put up a brave fight and 
a strong light — a:id get one free for 
three weeks' work, 

DON'T HOLD BACK 
SUBSCRIPTIONS , 

"When you .take a Subscription, 
for no matter what length of time — 
send it in-without delay. Walt only 
' until you have a fair-sized order — 
don't, for any reason, hoi'd back the 
subscriptions for any length of time. 

There is no object to .'be gained 
by so doing — and there is much to 
be lost. The average man, when -he 
subscribes for a newspaper, wants 
tihat newspaper without delay — he 
doesn't want to wait and wait for 
weeks before receiving it. 

You can't afford to have one of 
your friends become angry because 
of the. kind of service you are giv- 
ing. You can't afford to allow any 
antagonistic feeling to spring up, 
right now. And— there's no quicker 
"way to lose the support of your 
fnends than by holding back their 
subscriptions. To send in your order 
at once means to get the subscrip- 
tions started at once — means to sat- 
isfy your friends, and to leave such 
a good feeling that, later, you can 
go back and get .their hern further. 

SEND IN YOUR SUBSCRIPTIONS 
AT ONCE — AND KEEP SENDING 
THEM IN ALL THE TIME. WORK 
HARD — AND WIN!! 

Pcssibly a few — a very few — -peo- 
ple have eome to you and told you 
that you've not a, chance in the 
world; that the great $3,600 auto- 
mobile campaign is unfair and notto 
be decided by merits — iu short, that 
. the dea' is not square. DON'T BE- 
LIEVE THEM ! ! Behind every; pub- 
lished or written promise made 
stands the word of The Tribune. 
^ 'What/ y^'u win — you wiK, receive, 
(tour work and your work aibne can 
win or lose for you. MERIT WINS ! ! 



to slow 

trying- 

This 



YHE TRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JULY 16, 1920 



Campaign News.,... 



Legal Publications 



for this amount — TO SLOW UPi 
NOW MEANS TO LOSE IT ALL!: j 

The t reat has not yet been de- 1 
eided. 3 To one contestant has a Ieadl. 
which c; in assure him or her of vie- i 
tory — -n( worker is far enough behind 
to feel ;ure of defeat. The tables ! 
may be turned by July 31st — those 
now in ;he lead may be far behind,! 
and tho e who are now iu the rear 
may win. IT ALL DEPENDS ON 
THE iaND OF WORK EVERY CON- 
TESTANT DOES FOR THE .NEXT 
TWO WEEKS. 

If thi t work is good work — hard 
work — c >nsistent work and determin- 
ed work — then voctory is almost as- 
sured. But if, on the other hand, 
any oik contestant allows himself 



up, to lag behind, to cease 
DEFEAT IS CERTAIN, 
campaign means a wonder- 



ful vict< ry to you and a wonderful 
profit. With the money that your 
victory win earn for you, you can 
do many things — can renovate your 
farm home, can add new machinery 
or purchase, addi|ionat i|tockf, can 
increase 
yourself 
stock to 



for you- 



your farm acreage, can put 
thru college, can add new 
your store. Eighteen hun- 
dred dollars will buy so many things 



-will do so much for you 



and those dependent on you. 



AND 



NEVER IN 



WILL YOU COME 
WHEN 



IT IS EASIER TO MAKE 
SUCH A LARGE SUM OF MONEY 
THAN iJlGHT NOW 

Go oi t and dig in with all your 
might — vork ad the time and with 
all your might for subscriptions. Go 
to every friend and every acquaint 
ance air 1 every neighbor and tell 
every one of them that you want 
and nee T his subscription — and why 
you need it. AND STICK ' UNTIL 
YOU GET IT. Call! in every avail- 
able res n've get all the back prom- 
ises and the back subscriptions that 
you can SIMPLY DO THE VERY 
BEST WORK HUMANLY POSSI- 
BLE 

And — rkeep it up until the end! 

The i ext two weeks will mean 

victory ir defeat for you. WHICH 

IT BE? MAKE THE DE 

VICTORY BY WORKING 

NOW TO THE 



SHALL 
CISION 

HARDE$T FROM 
END ! ! ! 



MANE IT A HOT ONE!!!" 



hi 



The 
man w 
waits ui 
Do your 



Mr 



YOUR 
TO A 



LIFE 
TIME 



man who acts today is the 
;ets there. "The "man who 
til tomorrow never arrives, 
best work today!! 



. B. Busy Says 




Subscriptions are easy to get, if 
you go i.fter them in the right way. 
Don't tell your prospect how much 
the subscription will help YOU— tell 
him how much it will help HIM. 
Don't a; k for the subscription in 
that winning, dispirited tone which 
leaves Uie impression that without 
the subscription you are. sure to fail. 
GO TO 8TOUR PROSPECTIVE SUB- 
SCRIBERS WITH A STRAIGHT 



BUSINE 



SS ' PROPOSITION — SHOW 



THEM HOW MUCH IT MEANS TO 
YOU AJjD TO THEM — TELL THEM 
THAT JOV WANT THEIR SUB- 
SCRIPTIONS NOW IF AT ALL BE- 
CAUSE YOU ARE GOING TO WIN 
DURING THE NEXT TWO WEEKS 



-AND 



THEY'LL BE GLAD TO 



WHAT IT MEANS 

Eighteen hundred dollars, for 
three weeks' , work — six hundred 
doli'ars a week — one hundred dollars 
a day — twenty dollars an hour. 

THAT IS MORE MONEY THAN 
YOU ARE MAKING RIGHT NOW 
— T HAN YOU CAN POSSIBLY 
MAKE. IT IS MORE MONflY.THAN 
YOUR FARM ORYOUR BUSINESS 
IS PAYING YOU ABOVE EX- 
PENSES. And it in more money than 
you can afford to Vose.. 

Yet, since The Tribune will give 
the equivalent of that amount to 
some worker in the great $3,600 
automobile campaign now entering 
is second stage, and since your work 
1 as made you '■ an active contender 



THE 



What is the customary way to 
treat obstacles? Archer Brown says 
that it is humau nature to DODGE 
HARD WORK — to slip past difficult 
places and to slur the obstacles which 
seem to mean a little extra woik. 
YOU'VE GOT TO GO OVER RATH- 
ER THAN AROUND YOUR OBSTAC- 
LES NOW— YOU'VE GOT TO OVER 
COME DEFEAT AND RISE UP 
ABOVE REFUSAL. AND YOU'VE 
GOT TO STICK— AND KEEP 
WORKING — TO WIN. 



JUST TWO MORE WEEKS 

Just two more weeks remain in 
The Tribune's gieat 53,000 automo- 
bile campaign. Just two week s /from 
tomorrow night, the whole fight will 
end — just two weeks from tomorrow 
night at eight o'clock, the judges 
will commence a count of votes and 
cash which will' give to hard workers 
a total of two automobiles and ten 
largeg cash prizes. And — the ques- 
tion for you to consider right now is 
this — WILL YOU BE ONE OF THE 
WINNERS? 

Be honest. Go back over the work 
you have done, and review the work 
you plan to do during the next two 
weeks — the last two weeks of the 
campaign. Tell yourself, if you can 
do so honestly, that you are ENTITL- 
ED to success — and then remember 
that the only guide to the awarding 
of prizes in The Tribune's great 
prize race will be MERIT and RE- 
SULTS. ,If you have done work of 
winning quality — YOU WILL WIN. 
If you have not — YOU WILL FAIL. 

You may feel- that, for some 
reason, you have fallen behind your 
rival's. What of it? The next two 
weeks will be the greatest and the 
hardest weeks of ail — the weeks 
during which the most desperate 
fighting for subscriptions, the most 
determined work for votes, the most 
consistent labor for subscription cash, 
will be done. Next week may change 
the whole" complexion of the. great 
race. You. who are today a little be- 
low a winning position, may do 
enough good work to place yourself 
in line for one of the two fine auto- 
mobiles. You. who fee.' today that 
you are beaten already and that 
there is no use in struggling further, 
may be able to pii'e up a sufficient 
vote reserve to win THE WONDER- 
FUL BUICK "SIX." 

So — don't slow up now!! Rather 
—increase your efforts. ■ These - last 
weeks are the most important of the 
whoic race; now or never, you've 
got to do the work that will win for 
you. Your friends will' realize your 
need, when you te'.i' them that only 
"two weeks remain of the campaign. 
They will see now* why it is that 
you have redoubled your solicitation 
for their Assistance. They will be 
glad to give you their own subscrip- 
tions and to heip you secure the sub- 
scriptions of other acquaintances; 
now more than ever before will they 
stand behind you' and work, with 
you. YOU CAN STILL WIN — OR 
YOU CAN STILL LOSE. The de- 
cision rests with yolu.i Hard work 
wili win for you — poor work will 
lose. You have invested so much 
now. in valuable time and hard effort 
and constant application that you' 
CAN'T AFFORD to sacrifice your 
advantages by letting . your rivals 
get ahead at the last moment. YOU 
ARE IN A POSITION TOWIN — OR 
TO LOSE. 

WHICH SHALL IT BE? 

YOUR LAST TWO WEEKS' 
WORK WILL TELL THE TALE. 
Make those weeks winning ones, by 
working with alii your might, b'y 
fighting all the time, by keeping go- 
ing all the time — lu short. BY PUT- 
TING UP THE HARDEST RACE 
OF WHICH YOU ARE CAPABLE!!! 

YOU CAN WIN — YOU ARE 
BOUND TO WIN— IF. YOU MAKE 
THESE LAST TWO WEEKS 
WEEKS OF WORK AND APPLICA- 
TION- AND EFFORT. 



Citation for hearing on Petition for 
Administration. 

.Estate of August 0. Schneider 

State of Minnesota, County of Pen- 
nington in Probate Court. 

Iu the matter of the Estate of 
August 6. Schneider, Decedent. 

The State of Minnesota, To The- 
r ssa Schneider and all persons in- 
terested in the granting of adminis- 
tration of the estate of said deced- ! 
ent: The petition of. Theressa 
Schneider having . been filed in this 
Court, representing that August O. 
Schneider, then a resident of the 
County of Pennington, State of Min- 
nesota, died intestate on the 29th 
day of May 1920, and praying that 
letters of administration of his 
estate be granted, to Nick Bundhund 
and the Court, having fixed the time 
and place for hearing said petition: 
THEREFORE, YOU AND EACH OF 
YOU, are hereby cited and required 
to show cause, if any you have, be- 
fore this Court at the Probate Court 
Rooms in the Court House, in the 
City of Thief River Fall's in the 
County, of Pennington, State of Min- 
nesota, on the 24th. day of July, 
1920, at Ten o'clock A. M., why 
said petition should not be granted. 

Witness, the Judge of said Court, 
and the seal of said Court, this 29th. 
day of June 1920. 

' Ira. C. Richardson, 
(Court Seal) " Probate Judge. 
J. M. Bishop 

Attorney for Petitioner 
j-2-9-16 k 



C. M. ADKINS 

Physici an and Surgeon 

Office Over First National Bank 



THEO QUALE 

Lawyer 

Practice in all Courts and B* 
fore U. S. Land Office ' 

AlcQinn Building 

Thief River Falls, Minn. - 



EMPIRE FARMS CO. 

Capital $2 5,-GOO 

Lands Loans City Property Insurance 

Bring your business to us. 
We Promise courtesy and efficiency 

215. Main Ave. N. 

'Phone 443, 

Thief River Palls, Minnesota 




Shrunken 



Dollars 



HIGHEST CASH PRICES 

Paid for all Kinds 

of 

LIVE POULTRY 

«t ■ 

DeCremer's Meat 

Market 



- \j hue a dollar will not buy as 
much as formerly, it will stiii' earn 
5% if left here in a savings account. 

./\.lso — a day is coming when these 
shrunken dollars will buy twice as 
much as they- will buy today — per- 
haps more. 

X hen will be the time lo SPEND" 
them. TODAY is the day to SAVE 
them. A savings account here was 
never so good an investment as it - 
is today.' Start one NOW. N.. 



Citizens State Bank 



HELP YOU!! 

Any i aan can learn to do a thing 
as well as any other man has ever 
done it, if he wilt only apply, himself 
well to the doing of it. The mere, 
fact tl at other aye meqttng with 
or have met .with more success than 
you iu rour work, doesn't mean you 
can't, 1 y hard work and constant 
application, pass THEM Stick — 
:nd WIN! 
the bottom of the causes of 
the sucdess of any man, and you wllf 
find thajt the foundation of the struc. 
has built is made of HARD 
AND HONEST WORK. You cannot 
escape jr deny the fact that only 
perseveiing, determined 1 effort, kept 
up withput fagging, will ever achieve 
while goal for you. 
W O R LD ADMIRES A 



work- 
Go t< 



a wortl 
THE 

FIGHTER. . The world admires a 
worker, as it must, because only the 
worker and the fighter ever achieve 
anythin; worth -white. And the 
reason ;hat the world admires' such 
a man is because that man is THE 
MAN TV HO DOES THINGS WORTH- 
WHILE . You've got to work to Win. 
HOW I ARD ARE YOU WORKING? 



WORKER WINS!! 



An honest man- — there is not a 
thing in life that he cannot achieve. 
There is not a victory that will not 
eome to him, or post in life that he 
cannot reach. The greatest and 
most important form of honesty 
right now is HONESTY WITH 
YOURSELF. -You've got the chance 
to win — you've the opportunity to 
achieve a wonderful goal. BUT 
YOU'VE GOT TO DO THE WORK 
WHICH WILL MERIT THAT RE- 
WARD—AND YOUR OWN HON- 



Continued on Pa£«3 




GOME 10 DS FDR 

POINTING 

That Sells Goods 




BOYS 



BOYS are well-known. You don't have 
lo go to far lands or to the County Fair 
to look upon them. Everywhere, it is 
stiU the style to have Boys. » 

Perhaps you are trying to run one or more 
Boys right this minute. Then you will know 
, that since the world began they were never 
so tremendously important as now. YouT 
hopes and your aims center on them. You 
must deliver them out of Boyhood into ' 
successful Manhood. 

WiU your sons stay with the land, or will 
the wiU-o-the-wisp of the cities cull them 
away? Armies of country Boys, who could 
be happiest and most successful on farms, 
respond to the artificial glamour of town life 
before they are old enough to know their 
own minds. They do not know that the 
rewards of country life — in money, health, 
and happiness — are far greater. Make them 
realize that! Guide the restless ambitions 
of your Boys and spare no pains ! 

Machines have been a powerful factor in stem- 
ming- the flow to the cities. Machines banish 
drudgery and make labor interesting; machines 
foster the love of mechanics in the Boy; machines 
are builders of fortunes. 

You now own many of the machines made by 
the International Harvester Company. We are 
headquarters for the International Full Line, in- 
cluding Titan tractors, International engines, and 
manure spreaders, Primrose cream separators, 
McCormick and Deering harvesting, haying, and 
corn machines, tillage tools, P4Q plows, etc. Give 
the Boys every chance for liking farming and 
farm life. Perhaps more of these machines will 
help keep them contented. 



C. GUSTAFSON & SON 

Thief River Falls and Grygla, Minnesota 







b!&£^±&&&-. 



SQjKJi^^fiu 






f 

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■Ji^4S*«:£7M^<j=jS^ jRJ 



FRIDAY, JULY J6J(-i9SO 



Automobile Campaign 

News 



Continued from Page 2. 



'i 



■<f~, 



ESTY WILL TELL XOTJ WHAT/ 
THAT WORK MUST BE LIKE, Hon/ 
est effort will ! win you a wonderftH 
prize. GO AHEAD AND WORK 
"WIN!! 



i 'it" 



ire to hor than 
ition : — since as 
oftener they 



offers while 



WHERE THERE'S/A 
WILL 

(Note: This true story /of a 
young man's great success, • un- 
aided by riches or. influence, in 
a campaign exactly similar to 
that now being conducted by 
The Tribune, and w/itten by 
that young man. several years 
ago, will appear in installments 
m this column during the pro- 
gress of The Tribune's great 
$3,000 campaign. / READ IT- 
DO N' T MISS /IT — IT HAS 
MUCH IX IT FOR YOU.) 
(By Roberf Douglas) 

Chapter Thirteen 
"Listen, Mr/ Sloan," I said "If 
a^'i you've got toe/much reading matter 
already; it's a; sure thing that you're 
not Heading /what you've got. If 
you read at/nil, you want something 
ft) read that is Worth-while — that 
doesn't waste your; time without 
giving yah any retjirn for the time 
given. The AVorld tarries more real 
news than any other newspaper in 
Brown /county — it gives the people 
that read it better and quicker ser- 
• Tice than any newspaper published 
anywhere in the United States. YOU 
CAN*T AFFORD TO PAY MORE 
TH&N YOU PAY FOR THE WORLD 
—and you can't afford to pay less 
aiid get less value for your money." 
/"Just what do you mean?" sbe 
lisked ."I always thought The Star 
/carried just as much news as" The 
'World." 

That was the opening I wanted — 
for she had admitted, tacitly, that 
she MIGHT be willing to change — 
if I could convince her that it was 
worth her while. So I went into de- 
tail, giving her every feature of The 
World separately, and emphasizing 
every one. I told of the editorials, 
, v written sanely and intelligently 
about topics of everyflay interest and 
meaning to thinking Americans, 01 
the news handled si that it was 
ftcsh and reaily NEWS, of the cor- 
respondence from neighboring towns 
and of the market jjage, of the ad- 
> vertisements and the want ad page 
— every feature that The World 
boasted. I explained to her why the 
advertisements in a thrice- weekly 
newspaper -meant m< 
in a weekly public 
they were published 
were, newer and m ire up-to-date, 
giving her an opportunity to get in 
on sales and speeiu 
they were new 
She didn't have a 
. t erf ere or stop my fljiw of tn'/k, and 
after I had talked fir neojrly ten 
minutes, she didn't 'want 'to. Ail 
she could do was to i take out her 
— cheek-book — butter and - egg money 
-*Jo -be used only for imperative nc- 
■"-' cessitie-i — and write out a cheek for 
ten dollars. . for a three-year's sub- 
scription to The World. "Honestly , 
Bob — I didn't know you had it in 
you," she snii.'ed. "You talk just like 
one of them city salesmen — the fel- 
leis that, always makers Hoi'eotnb and 
them other grocers buy so easy." 

She bade me good-day with a 
smile, and I went out of there walk- 
ing on air— -pretty much, convinced 
that my sales-talk was good. 

At tile next farm, I wasn't so 
lucky, for only the 'hit)}' of the house 
— was at home, and she was of the 
type who do nothing' without their 
ihusband's iconeonl)— it very praise- 
worthy trait, no doubt! but one which 
is very hard on subscription solicitors. 
,' At the next, and the next, I got six 
month subscriptions. ■'. after talking 
"' perhaps ten minutes at each. 

Then I came to Frank Smith's 
farm — old Frank Smith, the greatest 
miser in the. country- — a deacon on 
Sunday:-, but whose religion never 
blinded his "shrewd sense of money 
values. 

Luckily, he was in the kitchen 
when I called,, instead of being 
--*1iway, a s I had feared. He didn't hire 
-~. a housekeeper: — his wife had ttecn 
dead for years — because a!'i house- 
keepers wasted too much food. He 
was washing his clothes in a bat- 
tered tub when I entered, and met 
met at the door with a hard-bitten 
smile that didn't do a lot to reas- 
sure me. ; 

"Weil, whaddya want?" ho growl- 
ed. ■ ; . 

"Why— why— -" I was pretty much 
seared, at first — then I determined 
to show this sour; faced old miser 
that he couldn't bluff me. "I came 
out here today to take your sub- 
scription to The World!" I blurted 
out boldly ' and without hesitation. 
"Don't want it!! Wouldn't have 
it as a gift!.! Papers ain't no good 
no more anyhow !!*.' lie rasped. 

"Just a minute!" I pretended to 
get a little bit angry. "You've no 
right to tell me that a thing is no 
good, when you've ;not investigated 
it. How do you know that you're 
•, not wasting money by NOT taking 
Tho World?" ; 

"Aw — what's th' 'use o' payin' 
four er five dollars h year fer a pa- 
per thefs half lies : an' half adver- 
tisiu'?" he demanded. 







—- ff 




COW IS GUEST OF HONOR AT BANQUET 




. r. .I™ 19 A1 e atera » world's champion jersey, "steps oat" and dines In luxury. Mayor George L B-'- 
.01 Portland, Ore., to the foreground, proves that ho has not forgotten the days back on the firm "i 
serving fresh milk for some of the toasts. 



As t) the lies— I've nothing to 
say— beyond the fact that I know 
hetter, aid so do you. But— you've 
just adnitted the truth of my claim 
that you couldn't afford NOT tt> take 
The World." He stared curiously 
and amafeedly at me. "Do you know 
that everyone of those, advertisements 
represents real, hard cash to you' 
Do you" Realize that you can, by 
buying ttnu one of these advertise- 
ments at d by comparing prices and 
selecting the lowest one, save hun- 
dreds of dollars a year? Don't you 
know thjit these , advertisements arc 
■'each just such men as 
jaw tiirust out suddenly — 
l UTI V.. 1vi { le " !Uvake ' spn sibi'e business 
tie rci'axed and a smile be- 
crinkle around his nps 



Prices of 
newspnpe 
— now is 
and 



that, 
name of 
fourteen 
cain't afford it 

"Mr. Sinith, I 
mean that 
who, a 



;ha;ioe to 



in T 
which 
all the 
market 
the conn 
managers 
business 
take The 



Honestly, Mr. Smith," I went on, 
warming up to my subject and wax- 
ing more, and more earnest as I 
reached {he thought of my argu- 
ment, "ijou're losing money all the 
time if yon don't take The World. 
""' — """ everything are going up— - 
rs will p.ove no exception 
the time to get a bargain 
insure yourself against future 
increases, by subscribing now for a 
long tern ." 

He wai almost convinced — I knew 

Bi t Smith hadn't gotten the 

the hardest customer in 

counties for nothing. "I 



don't believe you 
I said. "A man 
you . do, markets large 
quantities] of grain and stock, must 
know when is the oest time 'to se.'.l 
—when prices are highest. We carry • 
World, a full market page, 
:vos you full quotations and 
i formation you need about 
:'iiiditions. Farmers all over 
iti-y have complimented the 
bf The Won't! pu their 
i nd market section. .If you 
World, you'd not only save 



ESPLEE 

1 Mr and Mrs. Wi Gerrulat were 
callers in Esplee Tuesday. 
■ Mrs. O. H. Olson and children have 
spent a short time visiting with 
relatives and friends near Oiil'iy. An- 
ton Knutson of Gully, a brother of 
Mrs. Olson, returned home with them 
ojT Sunday. He will look after his 
farm here and then return to Gul.'y 
accompanied by hts niece, Dena 
Olson. 

Henry Olson returned from Bemidji 
where, he has been working „ince 
spring. 

Wm. Gerrulat win have n auc- 
tion .sale on July 15 on account of 
Mr. Gerrulat's health not being good. 

Mr. and Mrs. P. Sund and family 
enjoyed a brief visit from Ole Ness 
and Guttorm Korvik, from Alaska, 
the fatter being a nephew of Mrs. 
Sund. They left Saturday enroute 
for their parental home in Helgeland, 
Norway. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. llenrieks and 
Pete Henricks of Thief River Fall's 
visited at the home of P. P. Sund 
on Sunday. 

Oscar H. Olson visited with Jacob 



Eirnerson of Bear Grove on Sunday. 

Mrs. B. Gullenback called tin 
friends in Esplee -Tuesday. 

Mi's. Peter Strand is enjoying a 
visit with friends and relatives in 
Chicago and the near by cities this 
summer. Mrs. Stromberg is keeping 
house at the Strand home during 
Mrs. Strand's absence. 

Ui.'ey Chapman, of Drayton, N. D., 
is here for a short visit with friends 
and relatives. He announced that 
his father, James A. Chapman, was 
united in marriage on July 4th in 
Dakota. Mr. Chapman is weft 
known at this place and we extend 
t>> tlie new'ly weds a wisji of a 
happy life. 

J. E. Ralfou called on Mr. Sund 
Tuesday. 

Mrs. W. E. Chapman, who has 
been visiting in Iowa for the. past 
four weeks, returned home last Sat- 
urday-. - . 

A hard rain fell here last Sunday. 
There was a little hail but not 
enough to do damage to the crops, 
but further north from here the dam- 
age, was quite great as the hail was 
very large and fell in abundance. 



~) 



P. P. Sund and Geo. Hook,, contrac- 
tors of keeping State road No. 12 in 
good condition were very busy last 
week grading and leveling a piece of 
new grade just put in where the wash 
outs since the spring rain were and 
now the road looks pretty good 

Max Konig wasa caller in Esplee 
Sunday. 

Warren Lewis is spending a short 
time at his home after working in 
Dakota since spring. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dahlstrom enroute 
for their home at Thorhult, were 
callers in Esplee Tuesday between 
trains. 

On Saturday, July IT, the school 
election will be coming oft" and we 
trust that everybody will be good 
and turn out. Follows, take your 
better half and come, show that" you 
mean business. 

Axel and Arthur Sund were busi- 
ness callers at Ali'yn Tunibull's Tues- 
day evening. 

The members of the. "Seven up" 
telephone line had their meeting at j 
A'llyn TurnbuU's home last Friday ■ 
evening. ' j 

Tile Inst rain put a stop to the! 
many who were haying for the pres- 
ent. 

P. P. Sund transacted business at 
Thief River Falls Wednesday and 
Thursday of this week. 

Allyn Turubuil wa s a ; Goodridgc 
caller Wednesday. . 

Ida Englund left Wednesday for 
Grand Forks where she will lie em- 
ployed for some time. 

Ed Martinson and Pete Nelson 
werp business callers at Esplee on 
Wednesday. 



Page Three 



cents; winter work per month, $44. 
To these wages room and board 
should be added. 

Labor is going to be tempted to 
leave the city for the farm, thinks 
Mr. French, inasmuch as such wages 
with room and board added give the 
laborer more than he can earn, ac- 
cording to the present scale in- the 
cities. 



MINNESOTA GETS FIRST GRAD- 
UATE FROA1 A1ARINE CORP 
INSTITUTE 



FARA1 WAGES HIGH; 

WILL TEMPT LABOR 



. What fanners are willing to pay 
for labor in Minnesota is being found 
out by F. L. French." secretary of 'the 
Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation; 
Thru the county agents Mr. French 
is gathering statements from farmers 
as to what they regard fair wages. 
Reports from 32 counties widely 
distributed have, been leeched. These 
•lew tint lcr general work by the 
d'iy fanner-- lix the w ige on an aver- 
age at $:i.t», Cor wn.'-l; by the month 
lcr -n months. ?l!S.Sli: for \vor.; <:t 
haying by the day, ?:!.S0: shocking. 
S4..'!(l; threshing, $4,315; fall work, 
$3.35; com picking, per bushel, 



Sergeant Henry II. J. . Krnger, 
Rrniucril. Minn, whose enlistment in 
the Marine. Corps expired .Inly 11, 
lHJll. has the distini'iion nt' being 
the first Marine Corp insiituio cadet' 
to complete (he at'iomobile course of 
the .MCI at ijuantico. Va. SerL"/TWu- 
ger enlisted ill SI* Paul and has sew- 
ed with tin. Marines at Man' Is.ainl, 
I'al.: Nicaragua. Panama; Key West, 
Flu.: Norfolk. Va. : New York. X. Y. ; 
France. Philadelphia, Pa., and i.iiian- 
tii-o, Ya. He is an expert ritieiiian 
add has made an exceptional" record 
having been awarded a Coed Conduct 
medai. 

Upon reporting lo the commanding 
ofiieer of the vocational srlieols he 
was appointed orderly fer the ad- 
ministration olliec and enrolled in the 
complete automobile course and made 
rapid progress until he has developed 
into the best instructor ami examiner 
in his class of over one hundred 
students. 

Sergeant Kruger will go out into 
civil life well lifted to command a 
large salary because of the exception, 
al training he has received and the 
thorough manner in which lie has ap- 
plied himself. His loss will be felt 
both by his instructor associates and 
fo!Jow-e!assnlou. He is a Marino 
through and through and'ilie entire 
school wishes him a world of sin ress 
ill his new iiei'd of endeavor. 



Wm. J. BROWN 

Lawyer 

Formerly County Attorney 
Marshall County 

Office Over, First National tJank 

Thief Rifer Falls, Alinnesota 



money bw getting more than what 
you pay or, but you'll also MAKE 
money, tint receiving information 
daily that will enable you to market 
your prod icts at higher prices.' 

I had f mud the secret of the man 
— with h s eternal lust for saving 
money, inything that suggested 
"something for nothing" or receiv- 
ing more than he payed for; appealed 
to him. I complimented him again 
and agaiij, boidly, for his business 
foresight and "honest judgment" — 
and he liked it. 

At about eleven o'clock, I was on 
the road again, with hissubseription 
for three years in my pocket. 

And" even the horse was happy as 
wo started down the road. 




The Best of 

SOAfears E^perienfc^ 
in this New | 

Small 



\ 



(To Be Continued Tuesday) 



Notice of Sale of Bonds 
School District No. 15, Pennington 
County, Minnesota. 

Public notice is hereby given that 
bids will be received by the School 
Board of pchool District No. 15, 
Pennington County, Minnesota, at 
clerk's office in Mavie, in said Dis- 
trict on the 30th, day of July. 1020, 
until S o'libek P. 'm. for" School 
Bonds issijed by said District! for the 
purpose of erecting and equiping a 
new school house in said District 
No. 15, Pl'nnington County, Minne- 
sota, said bonds to be in the aggre- 
gate amoulic of $0,500.00. in denom- 
inations of $500.00 each, to be 10 
in numbeij and numbered from 1 to 
10 inclusite, payable semi-annuahy 
on tile 1st days of January and July 
of each ydar until paid, to be dated 



10, and to be absolutely 



July 1. 

due and p lyablc July 1st, l'j:!g 

without ojtion of prior payment. 

No bids will be received for less 
than apr mid accrued interest and 
the right o reject any and oil bids 
is reservet by the board. Ail bids 
must be u iconditional ami accom 
panied by an unconditional certified 
check pay ible to the order of the 
Treasurer if said School District for 
$500.00 The School Board will 
furnish 1 the legal opinion o: Elmer 
L. Williams of Minneapolis. Minn, 
as to the legality of said issue. 

Ail bids shall be addressed to 
Carl Tallej , Ciork. 

By ordtr of the School Board of 
School Di triet No. 15, Pennington 
County. M ilncsota. 

Dated tl is 13th day of June 1020. 

: Carl Tali'ey 

Clerl of School' District No.. 15, 
Pennington County, Minn. 



Ideal 



&4m 



IkJtiNIW 



e f 



TRB accomnUte^ maraifartnring exp«rl*ae* of.oraf 
•hree-qnaitera at a century— «ndrth» Jndgmeot'crf 
' o»er -20,000 Ideal otnwn— iaft>ack*of itba>iiem 

l «saH 22 x 36 Ideal Thrtshec 

. , - Y°» kn , ow tte record and reputation of the Wer ttzea< 
erthe Ideal-tbere's no farming community Oat harot its' 
(Ideal ontats with their satisfied customers. Whenweven 

e called upon < to build a smaller size separator, we didn't 
"mm one oat"— we bnilt along the same lima as the 
iV determined thationr email i thrasbera . would be 
en In their class just as are the larger. '■ 

-_?l ,n *"? m " n «» »«II as the larger Ideals yon wffll 
S^J? 088 , f ™ tnre > rt»«t mean >thei difference .between a 
. -We" and a "guesswork? job. i Ideal thresher owners wffl 
tell you that. 

Bunching, oricylmdert winding :S>nnknown fa the" 
Meal-because the- Ideal is designed v on,tha principle of 
eoreaifr, even flow of straw through tbe machine from 
the time it enters thejcylinder nntil, free from all grain, it 
leaves through tbe stacker. 

, .?"* a " n » we I J,a< * d dw u e«I pates exactly tight In 
; TeJation to the cyllndeii*Then we designed the Ideal trav- 
elling slatted rake to take tbe straw from the cylinder and 
carry itto the straw rack. Result— more grate surface end 
• steady even flow of straw, making choking impossible. 



_ Shaking alone. wasn't a guarantee of complete separ*. 
tion, ao we put sets of lifting fingers on the straw radJ 
that tear tho straw open— rake h— beat it from banemthj 
Result-Complete separation and no waste. 

Then, to take care of the increased capacity doe to these 
Inventions and to make the Ideal do a perfect job of clean- 
ing, we put in extra chaffer area. The chaffer in the clean. 
fag shoe, with the adjustable sieve and our special system 
of wind control, guarantee a perfect job of cleaning with- 
out waste. Result — the kind of cleaning that gets "no 
dockage" at the elevator. 

Such construction shows why the small 22 x 36 wflT 
handle up to 900 bushels of wheat In a day's run— ■' 
the 28 x 44 up to W00 bushels. 

The Ideal is built in five sires — 22 x 36, 28 x 44, 28 x 4J 
32x52and36x60 — standard in design and constracdon, and 
meeting all needs, from 
the man who owns his 
own power and wants 
todohis own threshing, * 
to the custom thresher. |1b> 'j 

There's an Ideal. In 
▼oar neighborhood. 



Peoples Auto Co. 



Thief ■ River Fails, Mi 



inn. 




77lc guaranteed 

oiUbumingt 

oil- cooled 

OilPail Tractor i$ 

built in sis€t to fit 

•very size Ideal. 



ADVANCE-RUMELY 





f ' 

r 



T~T — -r— : ^ ." — - — * — r~7 -V,. 



— !■: 



_j 



<^~ 



ll 



».;- 



r^> 



Page F6ur 



The TTribune 

SEMI-WJSbkIjY 



ESTABLISHEP ISM. 



Official County Paper 



Pennington Trlnttnr Company 
' • Publishers 



Taos. A. Way, President 



Published every Tuesday and Friday 

at 

Thief Klver Falls, Minn. 



•B. B. McWUUams, Editor and Malinger 



Foreign Advertising Representative 
THE AMERICANPRES5 ASSOCIATION 



Entered as second class matter at the 
post office at Thief River Fails, Minn,, 
cnder the Act of March 3, 1879. 



.When Harding becomes president 
we may have a real investigation of 
the print paper profiteers that will 
.mean something. Drop in print pa- 
per prices, we hope. 



Washington — The. government will 
appeal from Federal Judge Hack's de- 
cision dismissing indictment against 
the American Woolen Company of 
New York and Massachusetts. This 
was announced by the department 
of justice. 



McAd'oo can still live "in silence" 
at his home in New Yonk. The con- 
vention is over and the country is 
saved from any possible misrule from 
a man who has been largely respon- 
sible for present highly inflated finan- 
cial conditions and labor troubles in 
this country. 



It is not impossible that Penning- 
ton county may be the greatest 
sweet clover county in the United 
States. .The crop ! this year may 
prove that. We have broken other 
records in agricultural pursuits. We 
may easily be the top notch county 
of the union in the production of 
this great and profitable crop. The 
Tribune will give you the compara- 
tive information at the close of the 
season. 



Frank 'Day says the nomination of 
C* x "is an insult." How many times, 
Frank, are you going to allow your- 
self to be "plunged in deep despair", 
before you give up trying to be a 
Democrat? Remember the time the 
president vetoed the Volstead bill, 
and what tears you shed? You won- 
dered then if "that wet duck of a 
-Tumulty wasn't to blame for getting 
our president in bad with the good 
people of the country." You cau't 
blame Tumulty for the nomination of 
Cox. He was for that noble sacrifice 
offered upon the alter of the admin- 
istration who reduced the high cost 
of living — Minneapolis Tribune. 



MACHINERY FOR STATE MILL TO 
COST $300,000 

Bismarck, — Contracts for machin- 
ery, the estimated cost, of which is 
about $000,000 will be let soon and 
installed off the power house of the 
6tate_. mill and elevator under con- 
struction in Grand Forks, it was said 
following a meeting of the state in- 
dustrial commission. 

Figures on .the machinery needed 
for the power plant were submitted 
for the board and engineers are en- 
gaged in checking them. — Grand 
HeraUl. 



FIXANCLiL NOTES 
Boston — Mills of the American 
Woolen company thrudut New Eng- 
land, New York state, yesterday 'sus- 
pended activities .ndefinitely in the 
first great reaction from the war- 
time rush which had fallen upon 
American industry. More than 40,- 
000 workers are idle and the exodus 
from mill cities has begun. -Lack of 
business, cancellation of rriany or- 
ders and the indictment of the com- 
pany by the' goverment for profiteer- 
ing are given as i the reason for the 
shutdown. ' .— - 

I' *".i>ase note that 40,000 employes 
are idle. This is a shut down upon 
the part of the mill owners to "sta- 
balize' y ^Tmeaning control) the market 
so ci'oth will remain high. This is 
criminal profiteering.- Where is the 
Department of Justice? Where. is the 
statesman who kept us out of war? 



-i_ 



T WOMEN'S VOTES 

There is nothing either 'flattering 
or pi'easing to the great majority of 
women in this country in any pros- 
pect of having suffrage granted as 
a vote-bribing scheme. Nor are they 
any better pleased at those mistaken 
members of their, sex who are threat- 
ening that the women's vote. will be 
thrown to the party which first se- 
cures final ratification of suffrage. 

Whatever the circumstances are of 

finai ratification, neither party is en- 

■ titled-itd any pledge :of the feminine 

vote because of it. There are men 

active in both parties who are true 

champions of suffrage, who have 

worked to secure it without regard 

to party politics, have* voted for it 

•consistently. There are men in both 

. i parties who have fought it bitter»y 

v land still hope that women wilf not 

*be given* the "Dali'otj In time for the 

"•■coming election. ■■; While the repnbli- 

' " ■ ' can party is largeVy- responsible for 

the law which will permit women to 

vote, neither party is entitled solely 

" to the women vote as a reward for 

' obtaining (suffrage; neither merits 

the wholesale, withdrawal of femin- 

...sxsJne-.Buppprt.pn. the ground of. haying 

denied it. . 

Suffrage is not a question of poli- 
tical parties.b ut of citizenship, and 






L 



,-■ ■.- -. 



FRIDAY, JULY 16, 1930 



citizenship involves th'eTight to the 
ball it;"' and the ■inah^n'aW'rignt^ 
chotjse party affiliations nntrammeif; 
efl. ','.... 

Whatever the mistaieii^dMS oj 
falsi hopes of eitn'er' ! ihanf*or female 
poii icians may be, when the eleanr 
cut, 
the 

bribe, bnt as her right, and she will 
it- as- her conscience and Judg- 
ment dictate. 



thinking American women* gets 
vote, she will accept it hot as a 



/ 



DUN'S PREDICTS LOWER 
I PRICE3< ■'■;•. 

The fact that sellers ' no ,-Ipnger 
dominate about all' markets ismade 
clea • by each succeeding week's dis 
patches, and the desire. ' to" move 
gooc s is more pronounced in chan- 
nel where the changed attitude of 
the lorisuming public, which does not 
now purchase, so extravagantly as in 
the past, or with so ' litti'e regard to 
pric >s, is fully appreciated. The de- 
velo [vnient of such phases as these 
had not been unexpected, and the du- 
ration of the present 'mil in business 
will depend largely .upon how soon 
fche pri'q'e ?^eacu)m "becomes wide- 
spread, and to what extent it -is car- 
ried That much work is yet to be 
done to offset the war-time restraint 
upon private enterprise, is not to be 
doul ited ; but prices that are still far 
aboie the 1914 level are not conduc- 
tive to sustained mercantile and in- 
dustrial activity under peace condi- 
tion! as many cancellations' and 
revii ions of orders have demonstrat- 
ed 

Observers of economic conditions 
hav< not failed to detect signs of 
price reaction in reports from various 
markets, and some further evidence 
of t le readjustment appears in cur- 
rent compilations of index numbers. 
As measuring by Dun's report, which 
is based on the estimated per capita 
cons jmption of many essential corn- 
mod ties, the general levei' of whole- 
sale prices was about 0.7 per cent 
Towei' on July 1 than a month earlier, 



and 
cord 



treme rise of nearly 120 per cent 



abov 



e the 1914 basis, the recent de- 



1.1 per cent under the high re- 
of May 1, this year. After an ex- 



cline seems trivial, and prices, are 
still' more than 5 per cent higher, on 
the 1 verage, than they were when the 
pre.s >nt year .opened.o 

Close analysis 6f the figures, how- 
ever! discloses the fact that the sus- 
tained firmness of most foodstuffs 
has jai'oue prevented a larger reces- 
sion in the index number, and that 
the yielding in the clothing class has 
already made considerable progress. 
With a reduction o» f ood costs, which 
cannot be indefinitely postponed if 
present prospects for abundant grain 
crops are realized, the price situation 
will' assume more favorable aspects 
from the consumer's viewpoint. 



COAL 

Sipnx Falls Press : Attorney General 
Pain er has for some time insisted 
that I there is no coal shortage in the 
country, now comes George H. Cruch- 
ing managing director of the Ameri- 
can |wholesa*.'e Coal association de- 
claring there is no foundation for re- 
port! of an impending stringency. 
Assuming that these officials are cor- 
know is, where is the coal, if there is 
know is, where is thecoal, if there is 
no shortage? Business in the north- 
west! has been crippled for weeks foi 
laekjof ample supplies of fuel. Public 
service corporations iu many com- 
munities have' been using their mea- 
ger supplies almost as rast as receiv- 
ed and some towns have reported 
theyl are completely out. The vast 
docks at Duiuth are hundreds of 
thousands of tons short of their nor- 
mal quantity on hand at this time 
of year and it was late in June that 
the railroads entering Chicago were 
given notice by that city that if coal 
were not delivered immediately to 
meet the deman'ds for light, fuel. and 
Beat the coal in the yards of the car- 
riers would be confiscated. There 
may not be a shortage but such 
thin !s as these look dangerously like 
it. It is true that there have not 
been enough cars to transport coal to 
communities in need of it, but this 
one element alone cenrtainly has 
proven sufficient to create a shortage 
in at least some sections. There may 
be sufilcient quantities of fuel for the 
nation's needs already .taken from 
the mines and awaiting distribution, 
but ji pile of coal as big as the whole 
state of Pennsylvania does not help 
the people if it is out of their reach. 
The 1 interstate commerce commission 
but recently issued an. order, requiring 
railroads' to accord preference to coal 
mines east of the Mississippi river in 
the assignment of open-top cars, and 
the jme reason for this order was the, 
shortage of fuel in various communi- 
ties. The statements now going out 
fron Mr. Cushing have already led 
to protests from certain business in- 
terests against enforcement of the in- 
terstate commerce commission order, 
on the grounds that if thee is no coal 
shortage, cars should be released for 
the [use of 'other industries. And as 
a result of much talk and little ac- 
tionj the nation drifts toward winter 
witbj a big percentage-of the coal bins 
emptyj 

G >verhor Burnquist of Minnesota^ 
na s requested the governor of South 
Dak >ta and .the executives -of .several 
qthc r northwestern states to join with 
hini in a-reques to- the federal gov- 
errii lent: for a temporary restoration 
of t^e fuel administration tosolve the 
Dres >nt fuel situation, but how- far 
fnovement will get i s problemati- 
One thing is certain, however, 
that is the northwest cannot.af* 
. tp.P.efP»itwinter±o a MnWon I with 

sflortage of coaf ifftnTSfolreoln-'' 

mm ities and many of them virtually 

ana when we know that the 



the 
car, 
and 
ford 



out, 



?.: liir.^^i^ik&jldij iJmS^MMS&sMSd 






docks at DuirmiHwhich'are-puT-chSt 
source -^bfSai^'Sf^plily^ilte'Hifaess'' 
than^half-.itheir .normai* .cniantity - on. 
hantftlr* there ij jajfenty of-'c&l,- some- 
one supuM get bdsyjgettihgfcart 3>f it 
•ut here:- To Snow' there is lilehts' 
of coal in Pennsylvania does the: 
northwest as much good as knowl- 
edge that France is well' supplied, if 
we do not get it transported and 
.distributed where it is needed, 

T£e coal problem today is not 
academic. It is a straight business 
proposition of getting: fuel to the 
people..and .to industries that, demand 
it.: x It is now midsummer; "ind; the 
^'situation is litti'e if any- better than 
it was earlier in the; year.- -Argument 
and thesis are hot going to solve the 
problem. It is time for a little official 
'pep looking to moving the coal after 
'it is mined. 



Mrs. L. G. Larson of Bridge street 
is announced as candidate for school 
director. The name of Mrs. J. J. 
Reichter has been most favorably 
mentioned. Beth ladies are admir- 
ably qualified for the position. If 
elected they will meet the require- 
ments of the office with ability, cour- 
age and honesty. E. O. Mogensen 
has also been mentioned as a candi- 
date. His qualifications are also un- 
questioned. The election is tomor- 
row — Saturday. 



Jelly. Preserve, Vegetable and 
Relish iabels— all ready to stick on 
the jars— at Laird's. , . 



ROSEWOOD 

P Sorenson returned Friday eve- 
ning from Warren and Angus where 
he has spent a few days visiting with 
his daughters, Mrs. Anderson and 
Mrs. Stroble.' 

The Oscar Blomberg family re- 
turned to'their home at Crookston the 
first of the week after spending a 
week's vacation with the Haugeu 
Bros, families here. Their oldest son, 
Herman, remained and wiil spend a 
few additional w T eeks here. 

The annual school meeting 'will be 
held at Rosebauk next Saturday 
evening, July 17. Both a new clerk 
and a new treasurer will be voted 
in besides other business pertaining 
to the scohol district. Both men and 
women of legal age and residence of 
the district may vote. 

The "Farmers State bank moved 
into their new building last .Monday. 
.This is the finest building n' town, 
modern and up-to-date -and a 'recom- 
mendation to the community; 



NOTICE OF ANNUAU SCHOOL 
MEETING 

Notice is hereby given that the 
annual meeting of the qualified 
voters of Independent School District 
number eighteen of Pennington 
couty, Minnesota, will be held at the 
Auditorium in .the city of Thief Biver 
Fails in said county on July 17', i920, 
at seven o'clock P. M., for the pur- 
pose of electing two directors, each 
for a term of three yearsv'to succeed 
F. F. Haynes and H. S. Dahlen, 
whose terms will expire, and to trans- 
act any other business which may 
come before the meeting 

The following aie the names of 
the candidates for the office of school 
director for whom applications have 
been filed and their names be placed, 
on the ballot as such candidates at 
said meeting, to-wit: None. ^ 

July 7, 1920. 

P. O. Jlyhrum 

Clerk. 



Notice To Contractors 

Sealed proposals will be received 
at the 'ofllee of the Town clerk of 
the Town of North, County of Pen- 
nington, State of Minnesota until 
Two o'clock- P. M. on the 31st day 
of July 1920 for the construction of 
two piers and one abutment on the 
Long Bridge. Plans for'the proposed 
work may be seen at; the Town clerk's 
oSBee Thief River Falls, Minn. 

July 7th, 1920. : . 

T.-'H. Bjerke 
Town Clerk, Town lof North. 

July 9-16-23 



- -Benson-Barber • Shop. ■—-'-■ — r -5tf 

•HATEtaHHIMEAGB 'OIEsaiBVEHAIt 

quajtera. near Goodjidge; for rent, 

: FirstjSKEe'optea State'Bank 35-tf 



USED (CARS FOR SALE 

Buick Motfe? 0< 25.,. (overhauled, 
repainted and new cotd tires $700.' 
' Fordj late model, equipped with 
shock, absorber- and Tale lock, $450. 
Marion delivery car, sacrifice price 
$300. Empire Speedster, 5 wire 



-wheejs," new tires, a sacrifice at $800. 
^'Staude tractor attachment for 
Ford. ;: Brand new, pulls two plows 
this attachment sells for $230. Our 
^rie'e for quick sal'.e' $130.00. 

Overland 75. Overhauled, new 
batteries and a bargain at $475.00. 
Studebaker 6, overhauled 1917 mod- 
el. Car traveled less than 600 miles 
$.875. 

These cars can be seen at the E. 
C. Parsons Auto Co., Warren, Minn. 



A. W. SWEDENBERG 

Physician and Surgeon 

Eyes Tested and Glasses Supplied 
. Special Attention PaitL to 
Eyes, Ears, Nose and Throat 

Phone 350 

First National Bank Building 



Classified Wants 

FOR SALE — MAXWELL TOURING 
car. Good condition. Will sell cheap. 
Elmer Klungness, Thief River 
Falls. Phone 279 37-lpd 

LOST ON ROAD BETWEEN GRAND 
Forks and Thief River Falls via 
Pembina .trail, one 33x4. Diamond 
cord tire,' (spare) with tire cover 
and rim. Reward paid for ; its re- 
turn. O, Tess'um. - 36-2 

FOR SALE— THRESHING OUTFIT 
complete for work. Reeves engine 
and Reeves separator 36-60 with 
garden city wing feeder. Engine 
is a 40-80 gas tractor with 400 
gallon gas tank , tounted on truck, 
1 8 bottom stuble, plows, also brack- 
ens, a good outfit for someone that 

■wants to go threshing. For par- 

' ticulars write or, eall' on me. Bi'J.- 

Bakke, Thief Hiyer "Fails, Minn. 

WANTED TO BUT— LAMES 01} 

, Misses used bicycle. Must be in 
fgobd condition^ Phone 506.- : 36-2 

FOR ; ;§AIiEr-:r COWS jJKD ,'3 

- spring calves; May consider team 

of young horses or car, Tandrup 

SaltVedt, Highlanding. . 36-4pd 

LOST— BETWEEN RED T.AKTil 
Falls arid Thief River Falls, childs 
black silk coat oh Saturday, July 
10. Finder return, to Gazette office, 
Red Lake Falls for reward. •;•, 

ROOM' FOB. RENT AT 423'' MAIN 

& ayennKSM. \ ~3Z££\:-/- -.^S-Spd 

GOOD YOUNG HORSE. FOR SALE i 
cheap if taken at once. Inquire 




Special Steels Eliminate Useless Weight in a 

MAXWELL 



The reason the Maxwell engine is so 
responsive' and yet thrifty, the reason 
the tires roll into big mileage is due 
largely to one fact: A Maxwell is 
burdened with no useless weight. 

Special steels, make this so. They are 
made to Maxwell's own formulae. No , 
other steelsih any car are just like 
them. 

These special steels are' of great 
strength and make possible the. ideal 
Maxwell construction of brute strength 



with light weight. 

Obviously, they are high priced 
metals. They equal, pound for pound, 
the steels in any car built. 

The wisdom of their use in the Max- 
well becomes evident when one ob- 
serves the rapid growth in public 
favor of this remarkable car. 

Consider that nearly 400,000 of 
them are now in use; that 1 00,000 
more will be add»d to this total in 
1920. 



PRICHARD AUTO COMPANY 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 



- 




Sedan Convenience 
at Low Cost 



Orerland Sedan Averages 27.6 Miles Per 
-Gallon in Los Angles- Yosemite Run 



THE OVERLAND SEDAN JisJJproving .to owners 
everywhere the advantages of closed-car summer 
motoring. A permanent top keeps off sun and rain; 
plate glass, windows shut out wind and dust. And 
now the 355 mile. LosJ Angeles- Yosemite Economy 
Run shows remarkable fuel average of 27.6 miles 
per gallon — a striking endorsement of this Sedan's 
economy and the ridingjqualities of Triplex Springs. 



Northwestern Auto Go. 

K. A. Sua^ahl. Prop. ; 



**s»Hav>«22-*.s 



?t-c* ^ ■. l r ".ri r ., '. j^.. 



yw^i^ 



FRIDAY, JULY^ i*i, i»ad ~ 



■*- 



^ 



Free: Attractions 
Featured at 

AUGUST 4th, 




THAT FUNNY CLOWN with"Th< 
Savages presenting a side splitting 
act on the mechanicai revolving lad- 
der. 



^?ffia;a£?ffl;^ ' -. . ... ' .-■ ' -.-. -. " 



uiJunnjK t 'iu. | u-.uj r . , JvV.^ 






Page Five 



PENOTJgl^ 



5th and 6tfy 1920 



!fr5'--V 



"Afternoon and Evening Programs 




MISS IRENE SAVAGE of The 

Atlas *Trio, ; one of the most clever 
Triple. Trapeze artists appearing he- 
fore the public. * 




■&£ ' 













--—;-- •■'^=3r- 










SIDE DOWN 
OR ANY /IDE I 




:;vV^3M 











ART WILLIAMS, that Daredevil Birdman who 
walks on the wings in m id air, hangs by his knees 
on the supports, and era wis all over that plane 
.hundreds of feet in- the 
air finishing his perfor- 
mances' with a drop in a 
parachute from the aero- 
plane .'ac an altitude, of 
0.000 feet the greatest 
thriller in the amusement 
world of today. Appear- 
ing August 5th, oni'y, 
afternoon and evening. 



^ 



BRANCEL & JACK — Introducing one of the most beautiful and clever 
slack wire acts in Vaudeville. 

Presenting a wonderful line of juggling and balancing tricks on a thin 
thread of a wire, he also rides forth and "back on a unicycle a trick 
which- must be seen to be appreciated. 

He is assisted by Jack, no Jack is not human he is a clever little Fox 
Terrior and does everything but talk. 





THE ATLAS TRIO— These 
artists 25 feet in the air perform 
the most daring and hazardous 
feats of strength and agility ever 
presented to the public. 





A1ISS EVELYN SAVAfiE •■:h„ 
the. real rhrhliT. with Jlic Aim.- Ti 
Triple Trapeze Ai'i-iii! Casliii;: .\.-i. 



TffE SAVAGES 

The original Mechanical Revolving 
log the most comical Gown now 
lie. This act will be especially pi'easing 



ladder Act introduc- 
appefring before -the pub- 
to the kiddiea. ' 



^ih/li 



■ L 'J3£y >*»iv£^*<' 




The Little 
GIANT 
SHOWS 

— Featuring — 

New Aeroplane Carro- 
usel, Merry-Go-Round, 
Ferris Wheel, and 
man/new and novel 
feature shows and 
amusement devices. 



LIEUT. LARRABEE, known as 
"The Flying Squirrel" with the 
Jlinneapiim Daily News Flying Cir- 
cus. Appearing August 5th, only, 
afternoon and evening. 




: V**-* ^.' 



fc&&2£ 







THE GREAT SIGFRIED 

The Champion Ski juniper of Sweden anil hoi'der of 
the Canadian Cross Country championship in an exhibi 
tion of that great Scandinavian.. 'National sport, the 
most novel aiifl entertaining act appearing before the 
publfc. Sigfried is the only man-In -the world '-putting 
:Oh.such an exhibition ~irL. in' id-summer; ■■■ 




'■■%:, 



i\ ■?:■$. 



urn 




THE ATLAS TRIO 

In their death defying Triple Truiion- 
Act, they, defy every law ' of gravitation 
the world upside down. 



t'astini; 
mill turn 



^&pa&ga.&^^ 



;_.1 








Buildings Razed and 
Four Winds; Two 



over 
barn 



The ominous looking, cloud that 
"was noticed in the northeast Vast 
Sunday moving southeast proved a 
disastrous/ tornado to a few parties 
to the etvst of town, } ars Erickson's 
farm two and a hal southeast of 
Gatzke received the fill force of it. 
His large frame barn -was Iitterali'y 
torn to pieces and i battered 
forty acres of ground, 
contained live horses. two of which 
were killed, the other three being 
'saved. . His -well house-, machine shed 
and other smaller buildings all went 
too. His house being of logs set 
up endwise stood the strain and did 
not fail, tho it wqs somewhat wrench, 
led, the walls in places: being torn 
away from the floor a space of six 
inches. The kitchen mrt'is a one 
story.log addition on'tl.e east end of 
the house and at. on§ instant the 
northeast corner of this addition rais- 
ed up a foot from the ground and at 
that instant Mr. Erickson and the 
women-folks of his household ex- 
pected the house to go over, but it 
settled back and the danger was over. 
Mr. Erickson and his. . household 
stayed near the south 'door and did 
not leave the building. Even the 
plastering did not fall off tho it was 
cracked up somewhat. A fine grove 
of poplar trees nearly surrounded the 
Erickson buildings and this grove is 
a complete wreck, few] of the 'trees 
remaining undamaged and most of 
them broken over and j the broken 
tops, twisted into snaiji's. Trees a 
foot in diameter were broken up the 
same as he smaller ones. Mr. Erick- 



tion, - It 
him as 



and household goods as well as his 
outbuildings, is left' in a hard situa- 
comes particularly hard on 
e is still feeling the effects 
of being! completely drowned out in 
last years flood.- 

Along! with the wind there was 
haii that did some damage to crops 
in places, tho the hail damage was 
not general. According to reports 
the hail was worse further north and 
east, haij stones as large as a man's 
fist being reported from the country 
around Salol in Roseau county. Some 
minor dainage to buildings, trees and 
kmtstandng property, was done in 
the Han on neighborhood ten miles 
northeast of- town. — Middle River 



Pioneer. 



When 



DQ YOU 'MEMBER 



Ad rerrtising is an Asset 



the nation was at war and 



the German subs were sinking the 
shipping of the world, when we had 

to have s hips by the millions of tons 
in burden and the government took 
over the milding of ships to win the 
'war, Edvnrd N. Hurley was placed 
at the lead of the United States 

hipping board. This same man 
whose ju lgment was sought in the 
hours of the nation's peril now tells 
the Ad Club of America that adver- 
tising is lot only a necessity but an 
asset. He says: 

'Adver ising today is a necessity 
and an a; set. The time has arrived 
when the manufacturer and the mer- 
chant mist figure advertising costs 
and carry in his budget as an ex- 
pense jus : as essential as rent or la- 
bor. Advertising has been hurt by 
emotional appropriations — by. spas- 
modic flakes. For instance some 



, men still advertise only when they 
son's neighbors gathered there on j have spar > money and never put out 
Monday and gathered lift and stacked j a line wh >n times are dull and they 
w4iat they could find of j>0 or 30 tons | need busi less! The amount and na- 
of new tame hay that had recently i turo of a< vertising is to be planned 
been put in the barn. | The Lund- j with the i induction scale. Only then 



setter place a mii'e west iif Erickson's 
was damaged some too,! a threshin 
machine being demolish*!. A couple 
of parts of the Lundsetfcr threshing 
machine, were picked up in the Erick 
son grove, having been Mown a full 
mile. Thus does a stonfi do strange 
pranks The Frcsbyte$an church 
about throe miles west <jt Erickson's 
and a mile northwest of Rodis was 
■ also destroyed. It stood. on the C. 
E. Williams farm and the wreckage 
is scattered over probably forty acres 
ofjiis land. The marks oil the ground 
show that the building! was first 
lifted off its foundation ^ind skidded 
on the ground right side'iip for about 



Neighborhood JVebvj. . 

Contributed fey Th\-Tribune's Wide- Awake Correspondents. 



an we stabilize manufacturing, nier* 
'hnwlisini and advertising." — Time* 
Ropublicai , Marshailtown, Iowa. \ 

THIS WILL ASTONISH 

THIEF RIVER FALLS PEOPLE 



The quidc action of simple witch- 
hazel, can phor, hydrastis, etc., as 
mixed in Lavoptik eye wash, will 
surprise phief River Falls people. 
One girl v ith weak, strained eyes 
was helpe 1 by a single application. 
Her mother could hardly sew or read 
because of eye pains. In one week 
she too wa 5 benefited. We guarantee 



fifty feet before going ovir. • The cu- j a small battle of Lavoptik to help 

po!a under which the bell hung was j j^ Y CAS * : "'""'" -'--'- - J - '■- 

driven into the ground about 100 \ p?,"™ v\ at , , . , ,\ - 

, . ,. , „ . * "kk- F. a. Stebbms, druggist. T-2 

feet, from the former sife of the ' ' "^ 

buiuling. The stove wlicln-was a 

good sized round upright] heater was 

standing right side up" in the field 

about .100 feet from theSfoundation. 

unbroken except that the? doors' and 

legs were gone from it. j Pieces of 



IQWMADKFnfc 



the dfgan. chairs and othjr furniture i Wheat, No~ 
and apparatus were scattered over a i Wheat, Xo. 

j Wheat, No. 



wide expanse of territory.} 

Hut the hardest hit nia| in all tho 
storm swept area is Geo|ge Curtiss 
who lived in town of Whitftford about 
live miles west of the Iiollis church. 
His house, barn, machine shed and 
all other smaller buildings excepting 
the chicken house were demolished, 
household goods, machinery and all 
being broken and scattered. Mr. and 
Mrs. Curtiss and the smaller children 
were visiting at the W. ,T. Evans 
home half a miie north at the time, 
but the three older chi'di-en were in 
the house and miraculously escaped 
unhurt, the oldest girl of i the three 
pulling the younger two out from 
under the wreckage after the storm 
had passed. A mare and a couple of 
colts were tied in the barn but were 
unhurt, being found nearby tied to 
tho two-by-four which' had formed 
part of the manger. The tamarac 
grove near the Curtiss buildings was 
"badi'y torn up by the wind, too, tho 
it does not appear to have been as 
hard hit as was the Erickson grove. 
Mr. Erickson fortunately carried 
$1,500 hi storm insurance which 
will help out some in .making good 
bis loss, but Mr. Curtiss, carrying 
jio insurance and losing his. house 



Wheat, No 
Durum wh 
Durum wh 
Durum wh 
Durum wh 
.Oats, per 1 u. 
Kyo, per b 
Barley, per 
Flax, No. 1 
Flax, Xo.- 



Hanson & Barzen 

1 northern, per bu. 

2 northern, per bu. 

3 northern per bu. 
-4 northern, per bu. 



'at, No. 1, 

No. 2, 

fat, No. 3, 

at, No.- 4, 



Bran, 
Shorts 



per ( wt 



per 






ST. HILAIRE 

Miss Ruth Gigstad left last Thurs- 
day morning via the Soo line fpi 
•Honeyford, N. D., to visit at the C. 
Foss home. v 

After a three weeks' visit at the 
X. E. Beebe home, Miss Verna 
Thompson left Thursday for her 
home at Akeley. 

This village is to be favored' with 
a resident dentist in the person of 
Dr. J. F. Sprafka, who, upon investi- 
gating the surroundings, is satisfied 
that this will prove to be a spi'endid 
location for the practice of his pro* 
fessiou. He has made arrangements 
for office rooms on the second floor 
of the Haga store building in the 
main part of town, and is installing 
a complete modern equipment. Dr. 
Sprafka has had several years of ex- 
perience previous to his service in the ' 
army, from which he was discharged ! 
last fall, and is highly recommended. I 
The M. E. parsonage has been leased j 
for a place of residence and Mrs. 
Sprafka who is visiting relatives in 
Montana will' join her husband in the 
near future. ■ 

The St. Hilaire base ball team ac- 
companied by a .number of their en- 
thusiastic fans, journeyed to Oklce 
Sundaj; to play a matched game with 
a team of that village, but suffered 
defeat by a score of 3 to 9 in favor 
of Oklee. . 

The. load on Minnesota avenue has 
been improved by replacing the wood 



and son Marvin, of Black River 
township; Oscar and Frank Peter- 
son of Hazel; and Roy Sumpter of 
this village were initiated into the 
lodge. Officers were also installed 
and the members of the lodge took 
the opportunity to make the event a 
festive. one in honor of Mrs: C. Swan- 
son, who is about to depart for 
Minneapolis. After the completion 
of business for the evening, various 
social diversions were indulged in 
and refreshments were served. 

Mrs. Karl B. Johnson arrived Wed- 
nesday .from Caribous, Minn., for a 
fortnight's visit at the home of her 
uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs H. O. 
Jackson. 

Roy Wallin left Wednesday for 
Minneapolis, after having spent a 
couple of weeks at the home, of his 
mother,, Mrs. I{. Wadin. 



Hemstitching 
MRS. McKINNEY 

Scandia Block 

'Phone 252 

Hours 10 to 12; I to 5 



Take Sto=IUgal, a doctor's prescrip- 
tion for dissolving: gall stones, and 
complicated sotmach ailments. 

One box gives instant relief in al 
cases of GALL STONES, liver and 
stomach trouble, such as indigestion, 
dyspepsia, chronic appendicitis, gas, 
sour stomach, ulcers, catarrh, pains 
in stomach and back, constipation, 
etc. _ Don't wait but get a box of 
Sto-li-gal from your druggist today. 
Price ?1. Attention! No fake tes- 
timonials, but positive facts. Sto-li- 
gal has helped thousands of people, 
and it will positively give you relief 
in all ailments mentioned regardless 
of your age or duration of trouble. 
Write for free literature to Dept. F. . 
Digestive Chemical Company, St. 
Paul, Minn. Sold in Thief' River 
Falls, by Dr. H. B. Newell, Lambert's 
Pharmacy, also leading druggists 
everywhere. 



was a 



VIKING 
Dr. Johnson of Xewfolden 
Viking visitor Sunday. 

The John Nelson .family visited 
relatives in Holt Sunday. 

The Y. P. S. met in the church 
Wednesday evening of last week. A. 
Axelsou . served the dainty refresh- 
ments for which the proceeds totaled 
$12.25, 

Rev. Drotts conducted services in 
St. Hilaire Sunday. 

Miss Jennie Anderson and her 
en culvert near the A, Seaverson j brother, Alfred, from Minneapolis 



It Is Just as 

DANGEROUS 

to be without adequate Toi-nedo insurance as it is 
tire insurance. In the majority of cases fire losses 
are riot total but when a tornado strikes, it means 
a total loss to everything in its path. 

: We have on display in our bank actual kodak 
pictures of the Fergus Falls' tornado of last vear 
which ^hows clearly the enormous destruction of 
property m that town. 

Rates Extremely Nominal as fallows: -' 
Dwelling houses and contents $4 per 51,000 for Shears 
Mercantile buildings and contents S3 per $1,000 for 3 years 

First National Bank 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 
Resources Over One Alillion Dollars 




per bu: 
per bu. 
per bu. 
per bu. 



bu. 
per bu. 
per bu. 



cwt. 



$2.66 
2.61 
2.06 
2.36 
2.64 
2.61 
2.56 
2.49 
.SB 
2.03 

.1.02 

•3.20 

3.13 

2. SO 

!.90 



place, by an iron culvert, and what 
remained of the old board sidewalk, 
except across the creek on that ave- 
nue, is being removed. 

Mr. and Mis. E. M. Hoif and son, 
Abner, returned to Middle 'River 
Monday, having motored dowii Fri- 
day to visit with old-time friends. 

Mr, and Mrs. G. W. Hooper ac- 
companied by Mrs. Norman Patter- 
son and son, motored to Fargo, X. D.. 
Saturday and Were, guests at the A. 
Hesby home until Monday. 

A picnic for the benefit of the 
Xor. Luth. Sunday school will be 
given Sunday afternoon, July IS, on 
the cast side of the river between the 



Visited at the Frank Anderson home 
last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gustnv Larson were 
entertained at Fred Larson's Sunday 
afternoon. 

Arthur Anderson returned home 
Monday morning from the cities 
where he had spent a week visiting. 

The Farmers Shipping Association 
will ship stock Saturday, July 17. 
. Joe Jacobson, who has been em- 
ployed in Wisconsin for some tim . 
returned home this week. 

Frank Anderson's entertained a 
large crowd- of relatives and friends 
at dinner and supper Sunday in hon- 



Martz and Loberg places. A pro- j of Miss Jennie and Alfred Anderson, 
gram will' be tendered, lunch will be i of Minneapolis, who are visiting 1 
served and ali' may be assured of a ' them at present. The following were ! 
welcome. j present: Fred Peterson and family! 

Miss Mabel Patterson returned ■ and Mr. and Mrs. Gust Peterson of I 



' Tessum Seed, Grain & Supply Co. 

Cracked C< rn, per cwt 



Whoie covt , per ewt. 
Hay, per bile 
-Middlings, jirr cwt. 
Oil meal 

Thief River Produce Co. 
per Jb 
per lb 



3.70 
3.60 
1.50 
2.30 
4.60 



Hens, light 
Heavy hem 
Roosters, p> ir lb 
Turkeys, p< r lb 
Horse hides 
Calf hides 
Horse hides 
Eggs, per'coz. 

T.R. Co Operative Creamery 
Butter, per " 
Batterfat, rfer lb 
Milk, per qt art 



.14 
.18 
.10 
.18 
.03@.05 
.15 
.04 to .05 
.30 



Monday from the Physicians' hos 
pital at Thief River Fall's at. which 
place she underwent an operation for 
appendicitis about ten days previous. 
It. J. MeKercher returned Tuesday 
evening from Wadena where hehad 
lepreseuted the Potato Growers' or- 
ganization of this community at. 'a 
State Potato Growers' convention. 

Miss Vnlborg Sandum of Thief 
River Fall's accompanied by her 
guest. Miss Laviua Xelson of Minne- 
apolis, were visitors at the Carl John, 
son home over Wednesday night. 

After havjng spent a few days 
with the tatter's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. LA. Car/son, and with other 
relatives in this community, Mr. and 
Mrs. L. Ludke left- early in the week 
on the return motor tour to" their 
home in the Iron Range. 

Mrs. Rupert Nelson and children 
left Saturday for Langdon, X. D. to 
visit at the home" of Mrs. Nelson's 
sister, Mrs. Powers. - 

After having spei t a brief vaca- 
tion at the home of her luother, who 
resides south of the village, Miss 
Ida Engh returned Saturday to Hills- 
boro, N. D., where she is employed 
as a nurse. 

The ideal Rebekah lodge was in- 
creased Friday evening, when five 
new members nameiy.-Mre; M. Miller 



The One Food Above All 



It is delicious 
It is wholesome 

It is absolutely the only economical 
food to be bought today. 
FRESH EVERY DAY 



MOTHER'S BREAD! 



l : 



Warren: the Hed family and Miss 
! Gigstad of St. Hilaire: Albert Tornell 
family. Rev. Segerstrom. Mrs. E. 
Taugquist, Grandmother Taugquist, 
A. Axelson family and c. LindeS 
family. 

Xels Berg's of north Viking gave 
a barn dance Saturday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Myrbo and Al- 
bert Mrybo attended the funeral of 
their mother, Mrs Myrbo of Kensing- 
ton, last week Mr. Sands of Alva- 
rado had charge of the bank during! 
their absence. ! 

Ed Bigiow is drillin- a we.l onji 
ch • Malcolm Tangqu;-;r Carm. 

Mrs. S. Hanson TisiV> i nt the 
l.o-i.e of ,">r daughter in -Angus ovei 
Sunday. 

The Oscar Drotts family attended j £ 
services in Vega Sunday afternoon. 

The Skonovd young people took in j • - 
the Y. P. S. Wednesday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Tostrup arrived! ■ 
home from Frontier where they had 1 1 
been visiting. 

Emit Meilem from Nekoma, X. D., 
was a Viking caller Wednesday and 
Thursday. ' 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Backlund and 
children from Strathcoua, Mr. and 
Mrs. Carl' Bloom of Rosewood visited 
at S.S.Xordgaards Sunday. 




t tHI "Wi l Ml l i l HUh 



The Sun May Be Shining Bright f 




to-day and to-mirrow the 
worst storm i„ ycars mav 
break. It's the same with 
the hro situation. You never 
can tell when the devouring 
element may devour vour 
property and cause you irre- 
parable loss. There is only 
one sure protection — a policy 
of fire insurance in such 
strong companies as we rep- 
resent. If you are not pro- 
tected, see us without delay. • 
Don't let another night pass 
unless you are covered. 



-♦- 
t 

r 

i 



Lawrence Mtg. Co. 



: .aiS Main Ave. N. 



H-f 



" ' " . ' HMM M f 

■■**'.■ 



Phone 443 



-- t 




F RIDAY, JULY x6, 1930 | THE TRIBUNE 



aHmmuwi^^iwjuilJi-Jtrr.Tr;: .. Aj ■. ■!\-:v-. 



Page 7 




■Ic", 






Wft/cA .SVto// it -Be--? 



IT rests with you-.-it rests with you whether you shall come out on July 31st the winner of the Buick "Six" in The Tribune's 
great $3,600 autonkobile campaign, or a complete failure. It-rests with you, and with your work for subscriptions during 
the next two weeks. The great race for prizes is nearing it close—there is very little time in which to lag behind. If you're in 
the race to win-YOU'VE GOT TO WORK RIGHT NOW-and work MIGHTY HARD! 

The race is almost overt— true. But in the next two weeks will come the decision— for victory or defeat. The race is almost over— yet you can start 
work for subscriptions right now, and win a huge automobile on July 31st. 

IT'S GOING TO TAKE REAL WORK TO WIN THE BUICK "SIX." It's going to take honest, conscientious, determined effort for subscriptions-and 
it's up to you to make a whir wind campaign of the last few weeks, if you wish to win. 

MAKE EVERY MINUTE COUNT. Don't let a moment or an hour go by without some good work done for subscriptions. Don't let a day go by without 
increasing your vote reserve- -without increasing your lead. Keep working all the time— for in these last days must come the decision. NO ONE IS 
AHEAD RIGHT NOW— it's up to you to see that you come out a leader on July 31st. Make these hours and days win a car for you: 




CONTEST STANDING 



District No. One 



District No. Two 



Mrs. Henry Sandee, RFD, city 10,000 
Julius Liden, RFD, city . . .* . 10,000 
Mis. Thomas Rowan, city . . 430,000 

Luella Peterson, city 60,000 

Mrs. H. F. Boreen, city .... 10,000 



Betty Johnson, Holt 00,000 

'Sylvia IMersqn, St. Hilaire 405,000 
Martha Albin, Pi'ummer . . 503,000 
Ethel Anderson, Wylic .... 95,000 
Borghild Berg, Middle River 10,000 
Mrs. B. Singer, Erie 500,000 



Ounder Tviet. (;oji>en Valley :!00,000 
Arthur O.'son, Middle River 10,000 
Emilia Anderson, Middle River 10,000 
B. O. Xorby, Goodridge .... 110,000 
Mrs. C. E. Luudgreu, Viking 00,000 



The vote jstanding above does not contain a great number of names. From it has been culled every name of a contestant who 

could not ke.ep up the work— from it has been taken every name but those of really WINNING candidates. But those which now appear represent dan- 
gerous competitors to you. Everyone them has done good work and is doing good work— and will keep on fighting for subscriptions and votes right up to the 
end— You must beat them in order to win. So—put up the hardest fight during these last weeks— You must do so in order to win. Work with all your 
might all the time- Don't let i day or an hour go by without some good work well done for subscriptions. You CAN win— but in order to do so you've got to 
put up the hardest fight of your life during these last weeks. MAKE IT A HOT ONE! 




First Capital Prize— Buick 'Six' Cost $1,790.00 




Purchased from and on display at 
The People's Auto Company, Thief River Falls, Minn. 



Your Campaign 





local. 




. Uebiiardi. .Peteqsou aud nephew, 
George Johnson, who Imve been 
■visiting here, a few- days lift Monday 
afternoon, for Crookston where. Mr. 
Peterson is employed. 

Mr. Berveu "of Minneapolis, who 

has spent a couple of. days in this 

. city visiting at the home of his cousin 

Mrs. O. Tcssuni, left . Monday eve. 

ning for Montana. 

Miss Lucile McGIunity, who has 
been spending her vacation with, her 
aunt, Mrs. John Ford, of Red Lake 
Falls, returned to this cry Monday. 
She will' visit at. her parental- homo 
about one week. 

R. L. Hill, of Red Lake Falifc, ar- 
rived in this city Monday where he 
wih' receive medical treatment at the 
Physeians hospital. 

Clifford Storholm returned to this 
city Monday, after spending the 
week end with relatives in Gonvick. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lute York ' and 
Nephew arrived in this city Friday 
afternoon to visit for a:i indefinite 
period at the T. P. Anderson home. 

W. J. Reed, who has been employ- 
de at Glenwood, spent! the week end 
with, his wife, who is receiving med- 
ical, attention in this city 

Mrs, G. B. Evenvold, of Detroit, ar- 
rived Monday to visit one week at the 
Gust Woflen home. 

"Wm. Rodman and Jens Bolstad of 
Deer park, and Carl Olson, of May- 
field, were in the city Monday meet- 
ing with the county board on some 
ditch matters. ' 

Mrs. Nei's Larsou pleasantly enter- 
tained a number of her friends at her 
home Saturday afternoon. The after- 
noon was spent in needlework and at 
six o'clock a two course dinner was 
served. The affair was in compli- 
ment to Mrs. Lawrence Larson, of 
. Milwaukee, who has ' been visiting 
here. 

Miss Theima Christenson enter- 
tained a number of her little friends 
at a theater party or? Saturday after- 
noon. After the show the guests 
went over to Black's' : Sweet Shop 
where lunch was served. 

Mrs. John S. Anderson and daugh- 
ter, Carmen, of Minneapolis, are 
spending a week visiting at the J. 
Zavarol home. 

Mis. O. Taraldson of: Gully is Visit, 
ing at the home of her daughter, Mrs, 
A. Gunderson. 

Miss Edna Anderson of. St. Cioud 
Spend Sunday here visiting friends. 

Mr. and Mis. # Uoy Morgan return- 
ed Satimlay"~evonins from a fishing 
trip nt Fcdeal Dam. They report 
having tine luck. 

Hannah and Freda Erickson, of 
Dale, are visiting at, the home of 

Mrs. X. P.. "Waldorf and daughter, 
Bernadetie, left Tuesday for Crooks- 
ton where the.v win spend a we.k or 
ten days visiting ( with friends and 
relatives. ! 

Mrs. Ilarry.Tisher returned to this 
city Tuesday from Cyrus, where she 
has been the guest of her niece, Mrs." 
J. J. Morteiison. 

A. A. Babcock, of Bronson, spent 
Tuesday iir the city attending to 
business matters. 

Rev. G. O. Parish, . of KeHog, 
Idaho, who was at one time pastor 
of the M. E. church here, wi'il be in 
the city Sunday and will speak to 
the Methodist "congregation in the 
evening. 

Nels Aarnos. of Haze'i,. was at- 
tending . to business/ matters in this 
city Tuesday. 

Miss Evelyn Peterson, ^of Hazel, 
will spend, the remainder of the week 
in the city while she is i assisting on 
the board of audit. 

.Mr. and Mrs. K. . T. \ "Wang and 
daughters. Ruth and Laura, of Bad- 
ger, spent Tuesday iu this Jity visit- 
ing with friends enroute to Long 
Lake where they will .spen I the rest 
of the summer. ■ 

Mrs. Russeh'. of Superior, has been 
a guest, for the past week at the 
Chris Christiansen home. 
*. M. Jensen, of Rhoda.! spent Tues- 
day afternoon 'ooking after business 
interests in this city. ; 

Miss Marguerite "Wilkinson, of Red 
Lake Fa':ls. has been a guest at the 
Tandberg home for the past week. 

Mrs. Hans Haaven arrived in this 
city "Wednesday evening to. spend a 
-few days at the home, of ker brother, 
/ John Gullingsrud. 

John and Arnold WoU'en. returned 
to their home in this; city, after 
spending the past six weeks visiting 
at the O. J. Johnson home in Ford- 
viile, N. D. 

. Mrs. John Bergstrom and children, 
O"' Federal Dam, arrived "Wednesday 
evening -to visit for about two weeks 
at the L. "W. Manther home. < 

Miss Doris Johnson, who has been 



in Ford vine, . {.'D£? for the past week; 



visiting witl 
returned to 
eyenhg. 

Allan Crai 
ployed by t 



friends and relatives. 
this city Wednesday 



y, who has been ein- 
- . ... .e Lambert Drug com- 
pany, left W dnesday evening for his 
home in Isai ti, Minn, where he will 
spend his vication visiting at the 
home of his ; iarents, Mr.- and Mrs. E. 
A. Grady. 

James Partntau returned" 



city Wednesday, after 



few days wi J 
Miss Leal 



with friends. 
Miss'Ei'odi 
her' .home ii 
evening from 
been receivin 



THETRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JULY 16, 1920 



to this 
spending a 



h his brother in Noyes. 
Taqnin 'left this city 



Thursday m irning for her home in 



Oklee where 
definite peri( 

Miss Heta 
morning for 
be employed 
summer. ' 

Miss Alice, Paulson left Thursday 
for Oslo whore she will visit for a 
few days wi ;h friends. From there, 
she will go :o Minneapolis where 
she will spen 1 about two weeks visit, 
ing with hei 
Paulson. 

Misses Ma :hilda and Mable Bjors 
uess of Nev folden spent Thursday 
in the city mopping and visiting 



she will visit for an in 
d with her parents. 
Tison i'eft Thursday 
Radium,- where she will 
for the lemainder of the 



sister, Miss Lutrella 



> Paulson . returned to 

this city Wednesday 

Warren, where she had 

; medical treatment. 

In honor di his sixteenth birthday 
the Fisk Clu > pleasantly entertained 
for Blrie Beife at his home on Main 
avenue, Tuc sday evening. Bi'even 
guests were present and at ' ten- 
thirty a ligh : lunch /was served. Ah 
enjoyable tine was reported .. by ail. 

Roy H. Brown, who has been in 
Bronson. for [the past week visiting 
with relatives, spent Tuesday in this* 
city with frjends. He returned to 
his home in Grygla Wednesday. 

Albert Arvpsbn, of Neptune, spent 
Tuesday in [this city attending to 
business matters. 

B. A. Hermauson, of. Minneapolis, 
who has spent a few days visiting at 
the home of) his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. H. Hermauson of this, city, re- 
turned to Minneapolis Tuesday , eve- 
ning. Mrs. Henuanson and children 
will remain here for two or three 
week*, to visit with friends and rel- 
atives. I 

Mrs. W. IlaFave left Wednesday 
morning for IFort Francis, Ontario, 
wharo she will spend about a month 
visiting at th > home of her daughter, 
Mrs. W. E. F-enneit. ' 

Mr. and i !rs. .Dargon, of Bovey, 
who have bei 11 visiting for the past 
week in Red Lake 'Falls, spent Wed- 
nesday in tins city visiting at the 
home, of tli€ former's sister. Mrs. 
Jacob Thill. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. Rowan, who 
have been vi liting with* friends and 
relatives in J rgyle for the past few 
days, returnel to this I city Tuesday 
evening. 

Clarence C iok of Karlstad was in 
this city. Tuc sday afternoon to look 
after his bus ness interests here. 

Mrs. Ed Krohn and daughter, 
Lillian, of Viking, arrived iu this 
city Tuesday to visit a few days 
with friends ind relatives. 

Elmer Smith motored over from 



Alvin Holzkneeht and 

The party continued 

to Detroit where they 

Hid two weeks outing 



was joined b; 
Willie Bakke 
their journey 
expect to sp 
at the lakes. 

Mr. and llrs 
Mr. and Mrs 
are their gue: ts, left Thursday morn- 
ing for Winnipeg where they wil 
.-ppnd the da ,* 

Mr. and J rs. E. M. Benues and 
daughter. Ruby, Mrs. O. D. Ostby 



Fred Johnson and 
George Beadly, who 



and daughter 
Mrs/ M. G 
i-ft Thursdaj 



afternoon foi 



Maybelle. and Mr. and 
'riiorson of Goodridge, 
for Minneapolis where 
they .will spdnd a short time shop 
ping aud visiting. From there they 
will go to Siring cJrove where they 
will visit wiljb friends and relatives 
weeks. They will' 
make the entire trip by car. 

Miss Esther Bennes left Thursday 
here she will visit for 
about two we|eki with her aunt, Mrs. 
John Ashley. 

Misses LavVna Nelson and Valborg 
Wednesday afternoon 
for St. Hilaini, where they will spend 
a few days ^ isiting with friends. 

Mrs. W. Li rrant and children, .who 
have been visiting with Miss Lottie 
Austin, .returned to their home ill 
Grand Forks N. D. Wednesday af- 
ternoon 

F. C. Brejndeck left Wednesday 
Chicago where he wul 



spend about a week attending to 
business matters. 

Miss Mable Satre' left. Wednesday 
afternoon for Spokane, Wash., where 
she will visit for an indefinite period. 
Miss Satre will' be joined iu Fargo by 
Miss -T^ina;Pjsland. 
1 Ivy afialFem Thompson, who have 
been visiting at the home of their 
uhcie, B. Swanson, left Wednesday 
for their home in - Montivedio. 

Misses Selma and Emma Swanson 
left Wednesday; for Fargo where they 
will' attend the fair and spend a few 
days visiting with friends. 

Miss Amy Nelson returned to this 
city Wednesday from Minneapolis 
where she has spent the past ten 
months. She was accompanied by 
her nephew, Bobby Johnson, who will 
visit for an indefinite period at the 
home of his grand-parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. O. H. Nelson. 

Mrs. L. Lawrence, Mrs. R. Lam- 
bert, Mrs. Willis Akre, Mrs. T. A 
Way, Mrs W. B. Lawrence and Mrs 
Arthur Lawrence motored to Crooks- 
ton on Wednesday. They returned 
the same evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Tommeraasen, 
of Wiilmar, arrived in this city Wed 
nesday. where they will make their 
future home 

Wm. Michelet returned from Red 
Lake Fall's Wednesday where he has 
spent the past x two or three days 
looking after his business interests 
in that city. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. York returned to 
Argyle Wednesday after, visiting for 
a few days at the T. P Anderson 
home. 

Miss Hii'da Alberg arrived in this 
city Wednesday from her home in 
Hazel. She expects to find employ 
ment here. 

Rudolph Kusmak of Argyfe, who is 
Sergt. Hunter's latest recruit, Ieti 
Wednesday for Camp Grant, 111., 
where he will be stationed with the 
51st Infantry 

E. J. Lauderg, L. Irer.nd and Miles 
Lauder, who are pathfinders for the 
Grand Forks Better Acquaintance 
auto tour, were in this city Wednes- 
day to make arrangements for the 
tour. About seventy-five of the citi- 
zens of Grand Forks expect to par- 
ticipate in the ' trip, and the path- 
finders made arrangements with Mr. 
Provencher to serve lunch for the en- 
tire party. 

Alfred Anda, of Oklee spent Thurs- 
day in this city attending to busi- 
ness 

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Smith of 
Ponca. Nebr., arrived Thursday to 
visit at the home of their daughter, 
Mrs. C. C. Snyder for an indefinite 
period. From hero they w T ill' go to j 
Canada. ]\ 

Christ Steen returned Thur'sdayp 
from Fargo where he had been at-ij 
tending the fair. 

Mrs. A. W.. Phillips of Haze'i, S, 
D., arrived in this city Thursday to 
visit with friends. From here she wil. 
go to Goodridge where she will visit 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Grini'ley. 

Peter Dryer, who is employed in 
Plumuier. arrived in this city Thurs- 
day evening, to visit with his family. 
He returned Friday morning aeconi- 
pained by his daughter, Miss Loretta, 
who will visit in that place with 
friends for a few days. 

Mrs. Harry Miller returnefThurs- 
day evening from Columbus, N. D., 
where she has spent the past week 
visiting at the home of her brother, 
R. Newberger. 

Miss Eva Orroek, of Park Rapids, 
arrived in this city Thursday to spend 
a week visiting with friends. 

T. Quale left Thursday evening 
for St. Paul where he will' spend two 
or three days attending to business 



matters. 

Mrs. Albert vEngen and daughter, 
Mildred, left Thursday evening-^or 
Minneapolis where: they win spend a 
few days. From there they will, go 
to Waukon, la.'* where they Avill visit 
with relatives for about four weeks. 

Mrs. S. P. GhiMs, who has been 
visiting at the home of her. daughter, 
Mrs. A. Bottelsori, for the past six 
weeks left Thursday evening for her 
home in St. Paul! - 
' Miss Gladys Johnson, a graduate 
of the 16eai high seb.00,1, left Thurs- 
day for Fort Wayne, Indiana: where 
she will attend a business college. 

Mr ; and Mrs. A. G. Gabrieilson and 
Mrs Emma Orme motored to Oklee 
Thursday to spend the day ' with 
friends. 

T. C. Orme left ' Thursday evening 
for Minneapolis to attend to business 
matters. ' He will' be gone for about 
three days. 

After spending - two week's vaca- 
tion with her parents in this city, 
Miss Ruth Wold returned to Lang- 
don. N. D.. Friday morning. 

Mrs. A. J. Ildstad, of Grand Forks, 
is spending a week visiting at the 
home of he mother, Mrs. T. Lee. 

0. C. Hanson left Wednesday eve- 
ning for Minneapolis in connection 
with some real estate deal's he is in- 
terested in. He will be gone about 
one "week. . . 

Ross Potter, cashier Commercial 
bank, and Ellis Bloomfield, merchant, 
both of Mason City, Iowa, passed 
thru this city Wednesday afternooi 
on the Jefferson highway enroute to 
Winnipeg. 

Mrs. Wm. Herron left Friday morn- 
ing for Viking where she will spend 
a few days visiting with her daugh- 
ter. Mrs. J. S. Jansen. 

Miss Selma Peterson, of Roseau, 
spent Tuesday in this city consult- 
ing physicians. 

Mrs W. H. Thompson and daugh- 
ters. Irma and Laverne, of Crookston, 
have spent the past week in tniB 
city visiting at the G. G. Mattison 
home. 

Miss EiViiia Schmalenberg who 
has been empoyed for the past six 
weeks at the Thief River Wholesale 
house, left Thursday afternoon for 
Grand Forks where she has accepted 
a position -with the Creasey Corpor- 
ation 

Fred Protz left Thursday for 
Crookston where he will attend tne 
Mail Carriers convention! He will re- 
turn. Sunday. 

Mrs. L. M. Rayson aud daughters, 
Lucile and Lorraine, left Thursday 
for Red Lake Falls, where they will 
spend the remainder of the week 
visiting with friends; 

J. Thiil. who is employed' in Red 
Lake Falls, motored .over to this city 
Wednesday to spend the day with 
hi s family. He returned Thursday. 

Miss Ida England of this city left 
Thursday for Grand Forks where she 
expects to be employed.' 

: Harriet and Teddy Muzzey of 
Sauk Center, who have been visiting 
at the J. A. Wassgren home for the 
past we-ek, left Thursday for Red 
Lake Falls, where they will bo the 
guests of their grandmother, Mrs. W. 
Zaiser. 



hist Tuesday evening in honor of 
Mrs.-Q; N;- Eussell, of Superior, who 
has been visiting in this city the 
past week. The evening was spent 
in sewing, conversation and music. 
The rooms were profusely decorated 
with wii'd flowers and .at ten-thirty 
a delicious lunch was served. The 
guests were seated at small tables. 



Mrs. J. E. Bloomquist pleasantly 
entertained a number of her most 
intimate friends at her home on Main 
avenue Thursday evening The eve- 
ning was spent in music, conversa- 
tion and sewing. At twelve o'clock 
a delicious lunch was served. 



Mrs. N. J. Silk and Mrs. 0. C. 
Hanson entertained at a one o'clock 
luncheon last Wednesday. The affair 
was in honor Of Mrs.> O. N. Russell, 
of Superior, and tue Misses Sophie 
and Rowena Yqtter. of Madison. Wis'., 
who are visiting in this city. There 
were twelve guests 



The O. D. 0. Club entertained the 
same ladies at ii picnic held at Squaw 
roint Thursday -r-f ternoon. About 
thirty guests were present and an ex- 
ceedingly enjoyable time was reported 
by all parties concerned. 



SOCIETY 



Mrs. Christerson entertained the 
W. C. T. U. last Tuesday afternoon 
at the Finberg home. Election of offi- 
cers was held and thh following were 
elected to office for the coming year: 
Mrs. Anna Watson, Pres. ; Mrs. J. O. 
Sether. Vice Pres. ; Mrs O. A. Naplin, 
Sec; and Mrs. C. Hillard, Treas. 
Lunch was served on the lawn. 



Mrs. E. Jj Richards entertained 



D ANGE 



-at- 



MAVIE! 

Saturday, July 17 

TICKETS $1.00 
LUNCH INCLUDED WITH TICKETS 

Two-Piece Orchestra 



317 Horace Ave. N- 



-Thone 1 5 



Hall Brothers Co. 

Hardware— Farm Machinery 



Sxf loud! Vies/ 



Shovind 'Propeller • l:~7?^&.. fpi 
cjrd ueyser h\^^- ,]£) 
e.vOT/;:.t-. l*sX^'>-sS£r 




f^i JpR ■ j ... 



"A Good Place to Trade" 

Thief River Falls, Minn, 





A Barn Does Not Need to 
Cost A Lot of Money to Be 
A Good Barn 



/~\F course, size has considerable to do with 
" the cost, but very often careful planning 
makes it.possible to house more stock com- 
fortably and successfully in less space than 
might be necessary in a barn not well planned. 

'A CAREFULLY MADE 'PLAN IS THE 
FIRST NECESSITY in building a new barn 
these days whether it be a large one or a 
small one. The. barn of today and the future 
must be designed to fit the farm labor situ- 
ation — everything must be convenient and 
every labor saving devise possible must be 
installed. 

The barn must be built of good material 
--built to last— built to withstand wear and 
tear-rbuilt so that repairs and upkeep will 
be cut to the lowest possible figure. 

We can help you with such a barn for 
your farm and help you keep the cost down 
to the lowest possible figure. 



Prichard Lumber Co. 




-r-xy .-.. 






s^r»^!-^^wr'%y«s^^??H'a!?^^S'^Sf 'W 



VOL 20 No. 38: I 

BIG PROGR^ * 
ARRANT *>R 
FAT^fslTORS 



i*-; 



EVERYTHING THAT HAS BEEN 

-tilVEN BEFORE AND MUCH 

MORE ASSURED 



The nineteenth annual, fair and in- 
dustrial exposition of the Pennington 
' County Agricultural Society which 
opens its gates for the big show on 

. August 4lli. 5tU and 6th is snreiy 
going to be a record breaker from all 
Indications. [ 

Amusements and exhibits of every : 

, known brand and description are 
booked for this greatest event in the 
life of the country and according to 
all predictions ithis year is going to 
*xceed anything of a like attempt. 
The directors have spared neither 
time nor money to make this the 
banner fair of them all and large 
crowds on each day of the fair are 
looked for. 

Good, clean shows, free attractions 
that are only shown in the larger 
places are booked and everything 
presented will be of a high class and 
sure to pi'ease all. The aerial fea- 
tures alone are worth, many times 
the admission price of the fair and 
these attractions, have been booked 
at great expense to the; fair. It is 
felt however the. crowd jjwill justify 
the extra expense and help cut down 
the initial outlay. : . j' 

Exhibits in every Jj department 
promise to surpass thosoj of previous 
years and it is hoped that every one 
•will - make it a point: to have some 
sort of an exhibit. The woman's 
department, which is Id be housed 
in the auditwitini wilh the school's 

' industriai exhibit, is giving every 
promise of being Hie best yet. The 
ladies of the county are jinaking ev- 
ery etYorc to make ;their exhibit this 
year much larger and interesting to 
an extent never before attained. The 
industrial exhibit of the schools i. 
also one that is going to be hard to 
«qunl and in tlie opinion of those in 
charge of this work, the exhibit is 
sure to be the best so far presented 
to the people of this county and will 
do the school's and their instructors 
full justice. 

To. Be Entertained 
The Luther league of the Trinity 
Lutheran church meets Thursday 
evening, July 22, at 8 p. in. Lunch 
will be served by Mrs. A. Dybvik, 
Mrs. S. Quanunen. Mrs. C. Larson 
and Mrs. J. .1. Weeks. The follow- 
. — ing program will be given: 

Devotion : Arthur. Rholl 

Piano Solo ....... Palina Langseth 

Reading • Gladys Nelson 

Vocal Solo ,'. Ella Miler 

Speech Rueben Aga 

Piano Solo Mrs. G. Ward 

Vocal Number Mixed Quartette 

Business Meeting. 
Everybody invited. 



BAND 



which 



■ : skvys:j^:^' WH^.hw v-" . 








THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA. TUESDAY, JULY 20, 1920 



Official Paper of 'Pennington County 



TO PLAY 

A1 r'AIR GROUNDS 



The, Million Do'.i'ar band, 



was scheduled to. piay 



at; S(Aiaw PoiWt tomorrow 
evenii g, is to p'.ay at the 
Fair Grounds instead. It 
was d' icide at the last min- 
ute that the Fair Grounds 
would! be much more desir- 
able and the committee in 
chargi announce that the' 
concert will be given at the 
Fair Grounds at the hour of 
S:30 p. m. Remember the 
changp and tell all' your 
neighbors. 



I 



Coming In Force 



LARGE DELEGATION OF MANU- 
FACTURERS AND BOOSTERS 
FROM CITIES COMING 



Says Colorado Looks Good 
A line from J. B. Conner requesting 
that his Tribune be sent to his new 
mddress at Hoiyoke. Colorado, was 
received by The Tribune the first of 
the weeX, In his communication 
Mr. Conner states that "crop condi- 
tions are good in this locality. The 
estimated yield of wheat runs from 
thirty to forty bushel's. Corn, cane, 
wheat and millet are the principal 
crops of this country. In the valley 
everything is all irrigated, sugar 
beets, alfalfa and wheat being the 
main crops." 



We. are advised by the St: Paul 
Associate n of Public & . Business 
Affairs tl at the annual Trade Tour 
which vis its us on July 31 bids fair 
to have he largest delegation ever 
sent out on any trade tour by St. 
Paul's wli olesai'ers. 

The tr p is over the Sob line to 
Portai ai d return via Detroit. The 
train will consist of five standard 
sleepers, wo dining cars, observation 
ear, two ourist si'eepers for the band 
and train employes, and two baggage 
cars. Th; fact that the train travels- 
at night i.nd also very of ten at meal- 
time males it necessary to include 
sleeping ind lining car faculties on 
tlie train. 

The party will be accompanied by 
the Minn ?sota State band of twenty 
five pieciss which has a reputation 
over the entire Northwest of being 
a very tii e concert band, and a high 
grade iim of entertainment is assured 
our peop e. ■ 

Tlie pr rty will also have a com 
uiunity singer and everybody will' be 
given an opportunity to do a % little 
singing, Song sheets will be ills- 
tributde o the school children and 
others. There will' also be a~"good 
variety of souvenirs for distribution 
by repref entatives of the various 
houses pi .rticipating in the trip. 

Immediately upon the arrival of 
tlie speci il train there will be a pa- 
rade, henled by tlie band, thru the 
'business section of the city. Follow- 
ing the I arade tlie band wil: play a 
concert (n a main street. while the 
St. Paul business men are calling 
upon the r friends and .customers. 

The tiain schedue has been ap- 
proved b.r operating officials of the 
raii'road i nd barring accidents or un- 
usual conditions of some kind tlie 
train will arrive on schedul'e. 




Buys Fine Farm Home 

M. T. McFarland closed a deal Vast 
Friday whereby he becomes the own- 
er of rile Robt. Oi'sou farm. located ; 
three and a half mi:e s east of the i 
city, lying on the panks of tlie Red i 
river 1 . The purchase of this land 
give* Mr. McFarland one of the ! 
choice tracts of the county and it is i 
his intention to erect a new brick i 
bungalow and new ' bain, silo and i 
other improvements. His intention is ' 
to go in for purebred cattle and he 
lin s decided on tlie Hi.Vstein strain. 
It is the intention of Mr. McFarland ; 
to live on the place, driving back i 
and forth to his work in the ciry. ' 
This will make an ideal home for the : 
McFarland's and when shaped around [ man „.,,„ „ l>t< „ 
to suit will be one of the picture: (>„. ism , swett Marden, 

Mardi'u wrote this 



HARDWORKFOR 
TEN DAYS WILL 
WIN FINE CAR 



DECISION IN TRIBUNE'S PRIZE 

RACE TO COME DCRINQ THE 

NEXT FEW DAYS 



''The man who 



today i< (he 
tomorrow." — 



farms of this section. 



I 



Election Is Quiet 



AUTHORIZE 
FUNDS FOR 
DRAINAGE 



E. O. MOGENSEN AND MRS. L. G. 

LARSON ELECTED TO SCHOOL 

BOARD 



RED LAKE DRAINAGE BOARD IN 

SESSION GET SPLENDID 

RESULTS 



RETURNS FROM 
TRIP TO BIG 
CONVENTION 



The school eiectiou held last Sat- 
urday was rather quiet, only 84 bal- 
lots being cast. Thorc n<re three 
names up for the ■leusiou of the 
voters, those of Mrs. L. G. Larson. 
Mrs. ,T.- ,T. Richer ni:d E. O Mogen- 
sen. When the final count was made 
the total showed tlie foi'mving vote: 
Mrs. L. O. Larson, 44 : E. O. Mo- 
gensen. 2il : Mrs. J. J. Richier. 10. 

Very little excitement was created 
over tlie election as is evidenced by 
the total vote cast. 'Pie two elected 
are well quaified for rli-> position 
and will undoubtedly make splendid 
member^ of the already- eltieient 
board. 



PLANS FOR BIG 
BOOSTER TRIP . 
AkE PERFECTED 



GRAND TIME ASSURED ALL WHO 

TAKE IN TRIP NEXT 

TUESDAY 



^s'ext Tuesday morning bright' and 



early wi 
lined up 



Win Sunday's Game 

The Thief River ball team journey- 
►' ed over to sGryg'.a on Sunday and 
took the Grygi'a team on for is. nine 
round exhibition of the national pas- 
time, ending with defeat for the 
Grygla teiim to | the tune of 13 to 3. 
The Grygla aggregaton played good 
ball and did ad in their power to hoid 
the score more even but were simply 
outclassed from) the. start and could 
not connect with the local organiza- 
tion at any stage of the game. The 
score at- the finish, stood 13 to 1 in 
favor of tlie locals and in the last 
half of the. ninth- the Grygla team 
managed to slide two more soores 
over the home ipi'ate, giving them a 
little larger tally on which to buii'd 
their future hopes and aspirations. 
The local team- is playing mighty 
cle.ver bail a\id it lakes a good; team 
with plenty, of pep and real ■ ball 
■ playing qualities to take them into 
:amp. When they settle down to 
Ihe game in earnest , it is hard to 
beat them and from nil appearances 
they have settled down for the bal- 
> ance of the season, determined to 
clean up everything that comes along. 



'trip and 
The trip 



:1 see the fair boosters ad 
in front of the Commercial 



club reat y to start on their tour 
north to acquaint the good people of 
that sec ion that Thief Rive r Falls 
is very nuch on the map and still 
anxious to hold the good will and 
fellowship of their northern neigh- 
bor: 

While the . trip is taken primarily 
to boost the fair that is to be held 
next moith, it is also a good will 



a get aquainted excursion. 

taken last year still lingers 
in the niemories of those who were 
fortunatt enough to participate in 
the sami: anl it is certain there will 
be a lar re turnout next Tuesday 

to make the trip. 
The trip will be made as origin- 
ally plaiined, instead of taking the 
Great Northern route up, the Soo 
line rout : will be folowed and the re- 
turn trii made by the Great North' 
ern routi . The trip will end at War- 
road and the party will stop over 



Miss Lena Botliman, of St. Hilaiie, 
was in this city .between trains Mon- 
day shopping and visiting with 
.friends. ' . j 



night. • 'he return trip will be made 
the folo ring day and all towns on 
the nort l of this city will be visited 
by the b losters. 

Banners and advertising -matter 

carriod along boosting tlie' 

the members of the band 

be honored . guests on the 



will' be 

fair and 

will ai'st 

trip. Sljops will be made at ail the 

towns a 

given al 

tention 



Walte 
business 



CHAS. VORACHEK RETURNS SAT- 
URDAY FROM BANKERS CON- 
VENTION AT DULUTH 



The board of directors of the Red 
Lake Flood Control and Conservancy 
district obtained a court order from 
Judge Andrew Grindeland at this 
place last Monday providing for the! 
raising of a preliminary fund of $'a]- \ 
000 from tlie various counties com- \ 
prising the district, to pay for the: 
surveying of the project and the pre- 1 
liminary expenses of organization.! 
The amount apportioned -to- each! 
county is in accordance with the area j 
of the county within the district. The 
various counties are to pay as fol- 
lows to S. E. Hunt, treasurer of the j 
district.: Red Lake, $350.80; Pen- 
nington $470.22; Polk, $1,0S2.45; 
Marshall,. $307.88; Beltrami, $1,700.- 
18; Clearwater, $524.03; and Kooch- 
iching $298.08; The members of the 
chambers Monday were President C. 
G. Selvig of Crookston, Ed A. Aubol 
of- St. Hii'aire, and Axel Nelson of 
Holt, together with Attorney Chas. 
E. Boughton of Red Lake Falls. 

'grids district is really too big for 
the present laws," said Attorney 
Boughton, "in that under the present 
law the district can only raise $5,000 
for preliminary expense and survey, 
whereas Engineer James Walker has 
estimated that the. cost of surveying 
the Red Lake and Clearwater river., 
will come to $10,000 alone. All that 
can be done is for the engineer- 
start surveying and keep on as long 
as the money holds out. It will be 
necessary for the -next legislature to 
amend the law so that enough money 
can be spent by the counties in the 
district to complete the survey." 



Health Clinic Saturday 

Saturday. July 24. at the Audi- 
torium in Thief River Falls -frar.i.!) 
a. m. to 5 p. in. under the auspices 
of the Pennington County iSjlu'ic 
Health Association. Dr. 1'earee, BiRlv 
Specialist from St. Paul will i.-«mdipf 
a free clinic for our children under 
five years of age. ' 

A clinic will be held at Ihe fair 



-i part of 
las great volume on '•Su,-,- l . >s in Life" 
— but it wil! continue to be koo.I ad- 
vice for anyone. 

And particularly is it good advice 
right now for workers in The Tri- 
bune's great -$3,600 automobile cam- 
paign. "He who acts today ttins to- 
morrow" — the worker workKg hard- 
est and most efficiently today will 
come out in the lead on July sist. 
For right now — in the short time re- 
maining before Saturday night, at 
eight o'clock on July 31st — you can 
win the Buick "six. The race is 
ciose — mighty close. ' No one has a 
worth-while lead — mi worker has 
achieved such a position of strength 
as to feel safe in victory. Yon eaii 
go ahead and beat any worker m the 
Hold, by applying yourself with the' 
very utmost' of your abMiij-'aml tin- 
very utmost of your energy— by 
working^ to the limit among y*>iu- 
friends anil nciiuainienocs — by stick-, 
ing to you,- work and by making the 
work win for you. 

You have the greater , -banco 
right no\* that iki. over conii- to you. 
For the race can bo yours — you can 

win it decisively ami i-ompVtely 

if you increase your cITorts .„„| re- 
double your work during the -hurt 
time remaining. 

Don't big or hesitate Dmi'l ;r|ow 

yourself to slow up or |o 

t the end of Ihe ,ong ■ 

fully remunerative r;o-c. 

mit. yourself to I mi:r 



Bring The Babies 

Mothers bring your babies under 
five years of age to the free clinic 
at the auditorium in Thief River 
Falls, Saturday, July 24th, eouduct'ed 
by Dr. Pearee, Baby Specialist froii 
St. Paul. Hours from 9 a. m. tq 
5 p. m. To avoid waiting make ar- 
rangements with Mrs. J. J. Richter. 
Telephone call 506. 



Charles Vorachek, assistant cash- 
ier of the Citizens State bank, re- 
turned Saturday from the bankers 
convention held at Duluth on July 
7 and S. Mr. Vorachek was gone 
two weeks and took in .every feature 
that the convention offered, making 
the boat trip from Duluth to Chicago, 
leaving Duluth on the Sth and spend- 
ing four days on the boat. One day 
was spent In Chicago where' the 
bankers of the state were the guests 
of the Chicago bankers and a splen- 
did time was enjoyed by the guests. 
Leaving Chicago on a special train, 
the entire party returned to the Twin 
Cities where the. convention broke up 
and all returned to their homes. 

At the convention held in Duluth 
C. L. Hansen, president, of the First 
National bank at this place, received 
the nomination and election to the 
office of state treasurer of the asso- 
ciation, and enters. on his new duties 
in that capacity at once. 

Mr. Vorachek states that the. senti- 
ment expressed at the convention 
was that money be loaned only for 
necessities and that none should be 
put out on a speculative basis. Only 
legitimate and sound loans were to 
be considered and the needs of busi- 
ness to come firs? anove ail others. 

Conditions generally are reported 
exce.llenr by Mr. Vorachek and in his 
opinion the .country is in fine shape 
and with the proper nppication to 
business and the proper handling of 
the nation's funds, everything is 
sure to be. straightened out satisfac- 
torily to ail without serious incon- 
venience. 



in- disheartened or sclf.s; 
, ., , , . , . . , victory. Yon have no! 

grounds on the second day ot the fair! voll .,,.,, „,,, V( . t ( |.-f,--i n-.i 

' " i " lc j is' a toss-up— :he do.-isio, 

"W" | favor of you or againsj : 
i pending on your work lor tbt 



and arrangements have in 1 
for the appearance of a hea.th 
on tile second and third days in ol- 
der that every child in the county 
may have the privilege of meeting 
the wonderful health clown. Mothers 
are. especially requested to visit the 
cliiiie on these days and to bring the 
children. 



' *.<'!'. 


u 


nv 


Hi Wii! 


.1 


•r- 


]Ur,w 




IMl 


ntisiii- 


l 


in 


ye; w 


u 


— 


'I'll- 


r. 


C'l\ 


ni:iy i. 


o 


m 



1— de 
alanc 



ong the route and concerts 
each stop. It is the in- 

Df those in charge of the 
tour^to nake this the best yet and it 
is hoped that ail who can possibly do 
so have their cars out bright and 
early next Tuesday morning, all 
greased lp and ready to go. 



Reed, of Badger, was a 
visitor in this city Monday. 



Thune-Arneson 

Ole Gerhard Thune and Miss Clara 
Eline Arneson, of Hazel, were quietly 
married on Saturday, July 17, at 10 
a. m. at the Zion Lutheran parson- 
age, Rev. George Larson officiating. 
The bond was sealed by giving and 
receiving the wedding ring in the 
presence of Clarence Arneson, a broth- 
er of the bride, and Alma Thune, 
a sister of the bridegroom. 

The young couple left immediately 
for their home in Hazel where a 
Wedding dinner was waiting for 
theni.. Their many friends wish them 
a prosperous and happy fife. 



Lutheran Picnic 

Ziou Lutheran congregation will 
have a Sunday school picnic at Tin- 
oolph park Sunday afternoon at 2 
o'clock. i'he program will t.u:-si-t 
of singing by the children and preach- 
ing by several in English and Nor- 
wegian. 

Ice cream and cake served. The 
ladles of the congregation are asked 
to take a cake. Afl welcome, 



Ordered Out of Town 

Municipal Judge Tarrant intends 
to keep the morals of the city straight 
uuder any and alt circumstances and 
If it is necessary to deport a certain 
percentage of the city's population 
for that purpose he is right on the 
job anl ready to hand out the. travel- 
ing orders. Gussie Shoemaker, a 
notorious character who blew into the 
city a few weeks ago and who has 
since created more or "less trouble, in 
i one way and anoth.-r. was hailed into 
I municipal court yesterday afternoon 
\ and told that she would be obliged 
: to serve, a sentence of sixty days in 
j the city cooler and face a fine of $50 
if she was folnd in 'town after the 
first train left. Tlie southbound 
train on the Great Northern was due 
in ten minutes. Gussie made it. 

Wool. Growers Meet 
The wool growers in the western 
part of the comity will hold a meet- 
ing in the Farm Bureau office in 
Thief River Falls at 7:30 p. m. Fri- 
day, July 23. 

The purpose of this meeting is to 
decide' the advisability of pooling tlie 
wool with the National Wool Ware 
house in Chicago. Prices are very 
low at the present time and accord- 
ing to the opinion of W. A. McKer- 
row of University Farm it is more 
advisable for all wool growers to 
pool their wool fo r a few months 
until prices raise. 



ISSUE ON PAVING 
CREATES MUCH 
DISCUSSION 



CONTRACTORS READY TO BEGIN 

WORK— APPEAL TO SUPREAIE 

COURT TAKEN 



«»f Ihe m,.<'. 

S«i — make that .lr.i>i..n ;i f ; ivor- 
iiblt»- niii-." Tii.-n'.'i.-.'. y..iir work!! 
<'»{:ect thi' louse eii.N— L'.» to ilmso 
who jimiiiisiMi suIki -rip! i<m-. :nnl ^et 
I hem: jro In frieniis win. sii1>-«H1>imI 
once, ami Ki't .Iheiu to sulxrrilm 
n;raiii : jro to ilmso who owe hilN for 
arrears in The Trihitne. if :iny. and 
co'Teei from t lie-in. In shorr — \]<t the 
very l.est and tile ino-I etlieh-i.I untl 
the ino-it eoiisistent work pM-siMc for 
the rest of ;!ie eampaiirn. 

Make your victory a-siin-d "by 
working hanler than ever ri'-rhi now!! 
Don't wait a moment Ioiii;er — don't 
si'ow up for an hour or a day—just 
keep workin-,' and keep liiriiin^ — 
and win ! ! 



I 



The paring' question in this «*ky 
is still up in the air and there is 
much discussion as to whether orjio^ 
any paving will ho done this year. 
The genorai' impression i< that the 
paving will he started, and in view 
of the fact that the contractors have 
signed their contract with the city 
and have sent for their paving equip- 
ment, which is expected to arrive : in 
this city in 'the next two days, it must 
he. admitted that it looks very favor- 
able for paving. 

However there is another element 
that enters into the contract and one 
which is liable to throw a Varge 
spoke in the wheel of aetivities_ Those J a 
who object ro paving "this- year have 
apneaied their ease to the supreme 
.' Hprt and it is their intention to 
fight the paving every inch of the 
way. They maintain they will se.- 
cur.e a restraining, order if necessary 
to stop the actual work of paving 
am! are ready to meet the- situation 
as fast as it comes ai'ong. 

Therefore it now look< a-* if the 
paving matter will he tied up mi j 
some time, and the frank admission t 
of those who have watched the mat-! 
ter closely from the start, is* that! 
it now looks as tho the program was: 
tied up for a longer period than a: 
first. 

The supreme bench has adjourned : 
until September, which means that j 
the petition of the objectors wiil not' 
receive, attention until the court con-: 
venes. and possibly not for some lime' 
then. In view of this they hold that! 
the city win be restrained from en- 
tering into such a contract and that 
the contractors and bonding company 
will not »e able to go ahead with 
the work uuder the order they hope 
to receive from the supreme court. 

The next few days wiil tell" the 
tale as the contractors are fully 
determined to stare work unless 
something comes up to stop them. 



BAND TO GIVE 
CONCERT AT 
FAIR GROUNDS 



COMMITTEE AT THE LAST MIN- 
UTE DECIDED ON ("AIR 
GROUNDS 



I 
Tomorrow evening the Miiion Dol- 
lar baud, under 'the direction of 
Harold Haehuian, makes it - appear- 
> in this city, ffivini: a roneert 
ight thirty at the Fair Crounds 
and later playing for a big d'am-e to be 
held* in the Auditorium. The band 
makes its appearanee in thN ■■iry 
under the auspice-* of Emu-r-.r. Kk- 
lund Post of the Ameriean I.enion. 
The ha mi played in this ciry last 



Don't worry over the troubles* of 
your neighbor. The modern way is 
to let him worry over yours. 



year and are remembered :i> 


■i high 


class organization playing ; ! 


e latest. 


and most popular selection-; 


with a 


skill' seldom eonaied by any 


oi-gani- 


zation. 




There are -evera! -<.!ui ;[- 


in the 


band and n program t hat wi 


! i'Va-e 


everyone i- a<-mvd Th.- .-. 


:--er at 


the Fair < irouiids i- sun* in 1 


... a lee- 


ord breaker so far a< at'em 


ai.e,. is 


eonecriied. and the rini'ini't 


•e- Who 


are seiiiug th-ke-- ai:ii<»',n;«-f.il 


■■-.- have 


met with, very g».f».i Mi<---. 


,- ami 


from all indi^rioi;- i!..- a* " 


.■ndan-e 


wil! be lai-g,.. A f:ee |,.> 


will be 


run from the .■-.rii'-r of Ti 


.pi and 


Lal'.ree to the e.-nct-rt »ro:i 


idv and 


those who have v.<, i»;he r i. 


.■ai- of 


transportation wii, tind thi- 


mighty 


convenien:. 




The l>iir dance wiil be gi 


v:j im- 


mediately after 'the lon-ori 


am! the 


music will lie furni-hed ,1-v 


:i -even 


piece orchestra eompo-ed of ; 


[••miters 


of the band. 




An 'inquirer in a city papt 


1 wants 


io know if it i< legal for 


i young 



man of thirty to adopt -a young wo- 
imwi of twenty-live* It is — with a : 
wedding ring. 




\ 



PageTwci, 



=sss 



*a|L. 



Automobile 



This column conducted by Auto- 
mobile Campaign Department! The 
Tribune. 



A LITTLE ADVICE 



Lcu.ru to use your time. — 
George Matthew- Adams.. 

The -man who thirks ho has 
no chance, destroys 'ii s chance 
by acknow'edgemon: of sei'f- 
deteat. — Herbert Kaufman. 

Make yourself more efiicient 
by working harder. Hard work 
is the tinest training tliere >■'■ 
— Kcll<>& < 

If you Cannot do it one way. 
do another. But— g;t it done! 
— Colonel Charles I'. Martin. 

Never be discouraged. ■ — 
Rothschild. 

Keep your heart up and your 
nerves steady — and you'll do. — 
Itobert I.oiiis Stevenson. 

Learn to. walk past failure. 
— Matthews. 

Push your work, ,tuul your 
work will push yoi;r fortunes 
for you. — Marden. 

Don't stop part way! Don't 
become self-satisfied or content 
with work done ! Knee about 
— work harder and harder!! 
Climb higher, till you roach the 
pinnacle of success. Show that 
you have the will-power to 
reach success, by working until 
you have dfone so. — Shaw. 

Success caalg for hard work; 
devotion to/ your business at 
all times, day and night. — Hen- 
ry C. Frick. • . ' , 

Procrastination is the thief of 
time. — ^Benjamin Franklin. 



r^vj 



Sk^pKSEH; 



U~, 



THE TRIBUNE 



TUESDAY, JULY 26, 1920, 



Campaign News, 



"LABOR WINS ALL."— Tacitus 



tand po)nting to progressive con- \ are always ahead of your rivals. To 
Xoto the large amount of j merei'y go on working well enough 



struetioii! 

correspoi] deuce from neighboring 
rowns and localities which is a fea- 
ture. N( te the large and complete 
and uecuinte market page- — remember 
that this is published twice a week, 
and hem e i* much more accurate 
than rha of a weekly. Remember 
that the twice-weekly publication of 
The Tribune means MOKE FOR THE 
MONEY JX VESTED BY A SUB- 
SI 'KIISEIl — means later news and 
more of pt. means more advertising 
and morn correct market reports. IN 
SHOKT-j-LEARN FIRST YOURSELF 
THAT THE TRIBIJNE IS .THE 
WORTHWHILE NEWSPAPER OF 
THIEF [RIVER FALLS— CULTI- 
VATE IN YOURSEBF A BELIEF IX 
THE VALUE OF /THE TRIBUNE 



BEFORE 
IT TO 
FORGET 



Here's 
— Read 



YOU ATTEMPT TO SELL 
ANYONE' ELSE. DON'T 
THAT/ A SALESMAN- 
MUST HAVE CONFIDENCE IN HIS 
GOODS IN ORDER TO SELL THEM, 
th ■ whole thing in" a nut-sbell: 
Hie Tribune and learn to 



appreciate its features — and then go 



tell your prospects about 



out and 
tjheni. 

You'll be surprised to find how 
easy it will be to secure the subscrip- 
tions you) want and need. 

GET GOING TODAY — KEEP IT 
UP ALLJ THE TIME WITH ALL 
YOUR MIGHT— STICK AND WORK 
—AND WIN!! 



more than money, right now. To- 
day and tomorrow and the rest of the 
few days left of The Tribune's great 
§3,000 automobile campaign repre- 
sent ACTUAL CASH to you. The 
proper use of the. time means much 
profit — the wrong use means a heavy 
loss. MAKE THE LAST DAYS 
COUNT FOR VICTORY! 



to keep even with the field is of no 
avail, nor does it give you any 
credit. But to leap ahead of the field! don't slow up or lag behind for a 



DON'T SLOW UP. NOW 

Whatever you do, in your work 
for 'subscriptions, in The Tribune's 
great ?3,C00 automobile campaign- 



of mediocre workers — to jump into 
the lead and to inalntnm that read 
by hard, eonscientous. determined 
ctfort — THAT' is the fiv-rt step to- 
ward success! 



minute 

Not so much because it will hurt 
you with your friends and supporters 
in the work — though it will inevit- 
ably do so — but because it. means an 
Who rises ever time lw falls will [ ACTUAL MONEY LOSS TO YOU. 
sometime rise to stay. — William C. j if you slow up for one moment, from 
.Morris' What if you get turned now to the end of the race, 
down? — what if tliere tire limes' You have invested, conservative- 
when you t*eX that there's no use of] ly speaking, three hours- a day of 
•-snthiuing? It's not the fellow who 1 good work — if you have not. then it 



YOU HAVE INVESTED YOUR 
TIME AND YOUR ABILITY AND 
YOUR EFFORT IN YOUR CAM- 
PAIGN FOR PRIZES. You. as a 
sensible^ thinking man or woman, 
can't honestly slow up and allow 
this invested time and effort to go for 
nothing — if you are awake to your 
own interests. 

And there is another side to the 
matter. If you si'ow up your work 



now. after having worked hard for 
so long, you wilp definitely lose 
standing among your friends. They 
believe in you — they want to see 
YOU WIN— THEY KNOW YOU 
CAN wiiiyt-au you ai'i'ord to. have 
then: belieVo that you have not. the 
stamina to continue the hard grind 
of work for subscriptions': 



Continued on Page 3 



■Q^TW 



DEVELDPE THESE TRAITS— 

"A sales urn 11. to attain tlie highest 
typo of .siu-cess, must have certain 
charact eristics developed. And the. 
most important of these character- 
istics are: 

I'nnctualily. 

I'erseveranee. 

Confidence. 

Hntluisiasin. 

System. 

Judgment. 

Kespeetahility 
"" Honesty. 

Tins ■ may t'ook like a' pretty stiff 
JLsr to live up to. but it's a list 
which [contains every one of those 
good points of character which the 
successful salesman must have. Ev- 
eryone has these traits — if they'll 
only develop them." — American 
College of Commerce." Bulletin No. 
IV. I 



. The man who never fails is the 
man win never succeeds. You may 
meet rebuff after rebuff, refusal af- 
ter refusal, but, a s Vong as you keep 
younhea^t in the work and maintain 
erminatioii to WIN — there's 
<an stop you! You succeed 
(voiding mistakes, but by 
hem. When you fail tem- 
whe.n you make a mistake 
of some kind — -let that mistake teach 
you how to avbid a repetition of the 
failure. . LvND KEEP WORKING!! 



a firm de 
nothing 
not- by 
making 
porarily, 



1 



WHAT DO YOH KNOW ' 
ABOUT ST? 

A saVesman cannot have too much 
knowledge regarding that which he 
sei'ls — particularly if that salesman 
be a newspaper solicitor. For a. sales- 
man to go out in any' line without 
having made a study of what he has 
for sale, is to invite failure. When 
you offer a certain thing to a prospect 
— he wants to know what he's get- 
ting and he wants all the information 
you can give him concerning it. 

Get hold of ail the general informa_ 
tfon you can concerning the news- 
paper business. Sucri facts as this: — 
' That print paper is. now so difficult 
to secure and of sui'li high cost as to 
make it almost impossible for news- 
papers to sign up long term conrnv.-ts 
for a supply. From .this work to Hie 
statement that, since production cost, 
together with i'abor and supplies for 
newspaper preparation, have Inorca^ 
ed largely — THERE'S NO TETJ.IVG 
WHERE THE PRICE OF COOP 
NEWSPAPERS MAY 00. Therefore, 
it is good business for the wide-awake 
business man or farmer to subscribe 
now FOR A LONG-TERM— in order 
to. protect iiimsetf against any in- 
crease. 

Read over The Tribune carefully, 
Read the editorials* — observe the 
stand-point which The Tribune main 
tains iand has always maintained on 
art national and local problems 



MAKE IT SNAPPY 

Put into your "work ai'l the pep. 
perseverance and push you can pos- 
sibly give it— invest in your effort 
for subscriptions every bit of deter- 
minntiouland energy and ablity you 
■ possibly can. 

MAKES THE WORK OF SECUR- 
ING SUBSCRIPTIONS YOUR CHIEF 
CONSIDERATION DURING THE 
NEXT TAVO WEEKS. For in the 
next two: weeks the great race will 
be won pr lost — and it's up to you 
to win if possible. 

SPEED UP! Give the work every 
hit of hard and fast work you can. | 
Work not only with great energy but i 
with great swiftness. For you have 
om'y twij weeks left — and in that 
length of] time you can win or lose. 

SPEED UP! Don't slow up or 
keep pac; witlnslower rival's. Rather 
leap into the lead by increasing the 
volume and energy of your work — 



never fail's that succeeds — it's the 
w irl'tr who has the perseverance 
and sta.n.'na and det-'rinination to 
STICK :::id to KEEP ON WORKING 
who will win out in the end. IF 
\X.V H-SIv OUT ONCIC— don't, l.t 
it stop you! Rather — get up and go 
on again. And — keep going — until 
you win. 

Five good ru'fes for success are 
these: Hard work, common sense, 
good habits, practical experience, 
perseverance. Add to these a con- 
stant determined application, an en- 
ergetic effort that will not acknowl- 
edge obstaci'es — and you'll succeed. 

There's no profit in doing things 
by halves. To start a thing — to put 
any effort into it — to invest some 
time — and then to abandon the pro- 
ject, just when a little harder effort 
and a little more application can win 
for you, IS CRIMINAL TO YOUR- 
SELF AND TO THOSE DEPEND- 
ENT ONY'OU. If you stop work 
now, you're going to i'ose the worth 
of your time and the return which 
might have 'been given you for the 
investment of that time — you're 
going to lose your chalice at a po- 
tential fortune. YOU CAN'T AF- 
FORD TO SLOW UP OR LAG BE- 
HIND ! ! 

MAKE IT SNAPPY!! When you 
go after a subscription, go after it 
with a firm determination to get it. 
if it is humanly possible, and stick 
until you find whether or not it can 
be obtained. When you set out to 
reach a. certain goal, turn e.vory en- 
ergy and every advantage \to the 
work of achieving it. And — MKE IT 
SNAPPY!!!,! 

Time 



is certain that you have done the 
equivalent of that amount of work. 
if*rou wish to win at ail. This work, 
nuginentdl from l.ow 'to the end*, 
continued without, flagging or loss 
of time. (£n win the Buick "Six" for 
you And the Buiek "Six" is worth 
'$1,790.. TO SLOW UP NOW MEANS 
TO LOSE OVER A THOUSAND 
DOLLARS, which you^ave, poten- 
tially, earned. 




C. M. ADKINS 

Physician and Surgeon 

Office Over First National Bank 



THEO QUALE 

Lawyer j — 

Practice in all Courts and B» 
fore U. S. Land Office 
McQinn Building 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 



Shrunken 



Dollars 



HIGHEST CASH PRICES' 
Paid for all Kinds 

LIVE POULTRY 

at 

DeCremer's Meat 
Market 



w 



hilo a dollar will not buy as 
much as formerly, it will sti'.'; earn 
5% if left here in a savings account. 



,A.lso — a day is coming when these 
shrunken defjars will buy twice as 
much as they will buy today — per- 
haps more. 



hen will be the lime to SPEND 



them. TODAY is the dav 



to SAVE 



them. A savings account hero was 
never so. good an investment as it 
is today. Start one NOW. 



Citizens State Bank 



leap far 
work of 



ahead by putting into the 
ecuring subscriptions MORE 



WORK AND BETTER WORK AND 



FASTER 



by your rivals. 

SPEED UP! Keep working AT 
TOP SPEED all the time.. Keep try- 
WITJH ALL fOUR MIGHT ah' 
Keep fighting YOUR VERY 
cry minute of the time. 

IT SNAPPY! Make your 
ppy and persistent and \em- 



the time. 
BEST ei 
MAKl! 
work sni 
cient — and WIN! 



Mr 



. B. Busy Says 



to do y 



WORK vhan is being done 




The (nly road to advancement is 



our work so well that you 



EMPIRE FARMS CO. 

Capital $25,D00 

Lands Loans City .j Property Insurance 

Bring your business to us. 
We Promise courtesy ajnd efficiency 






. 215 Main Ave.) N. 
'Phone 4AI 
Thief River Palls, Minnesota 






jj^ma&a&i^. 



Unusual Showing 

of Bedroom 

Furniture 



The enormous stock of Bed Room Furniture 
we are displaying at this time is the result of 

of wise buying many months ago and for this reason we 
are in a position to offer many exceptional bargains in bed 
room furniture. Our stock is complete with every desir- 
able piece that is necessary for the complete outfitting 
of the bedroom. Many odd dressing tables in all woods 
and finishes at very special prices. 

Bed Room Chairs and Rockers 
to Match any Design or Finish 



Larson Furniture Company 

Main at Third 




liiifliliM TT \'n~ 'TV'"' -''■'"v ■_• 



"7-^ 



J 




TUESDAY, JULY ao, 1930 



Automobile Campaign 



News 



Continued from Page 2; 



A: 






IIP WORKING!!! Don't slowf 
up for a moment. Don't let any one 
or any thing persuade yon to stop' 
work. Don't allow anyone to frightj 
en you or to iiitluce y ou to give upi 

Simply stick — work — and win! 

HARD WORK IS THE O.NTA' 
RECIPE FOR SUCCESS. Keep work-! 
ing hard— keep trying with all your 
might — and YOU'LL SUCCEED: 1 ;! 



■&*•, 



There are several' contestants right 
in the same territory. All ot il'.cni 
say that the 'territory is worked out< 
Yet the sum total of tile, subscriptions' 
they have turned in is equivalent ro 
oni'y about ten per cent of the homes 
in their . community — if it is that 
great. You've not worked out your 
territory until you've gone to EVERY 

"HOME IX' YOUR COMMUNITY — ; 
and worked in some of them several 

. times. Ten per cent of the homes — 
ton per ven)' efficiency — -isn't enough. 
IMPROVE YOUR AVERAGE— KEUP 
TRYING AGAIN AND AGAIN UN- 
TIL YOU KXdW THAT YOU H-VVE 
GOTTEN EVERY SUBSCRIPTION 
TO BE HAD— AND YOU'LL WIN ! 



The wor'.d admires a worker- -a 
REAL worker. And the world not 
oni'y admires a worker — but it gives 
him pretty nearly everything he asks; 
for. YOU'VE GOT TO BE A> 
WORKER— A REAL WORKER— It) 
YOU WANT TO SUCCEED. And 
especially must you be. a worker from 
now until .Tui'y 31st, in The Tribune's 
great $3,000 automobile campaign— 
FOR ONLY BY' SO DOING CAN YOU 
POSSIBLY HOPE TO WIN!! 



MUCH 



I 



i 



7W 



THE TRIBUNE. 



IN IT FOR YOU.) 
(by Robert Douglas) 



r 



■;} 
'I 



(■■.. 



PERSEVESANCE AS AN ART 

How much. of a reunif can you iako 
before you ijotrin to net anarry and 
'discouraged? tan youtako a turn- 
down and jro on and take another 
a;I then com.^ hurk and make sales 
at both places, on your return trip? 
Can you force yourself to forget you 
own private interests or temper in 
the. cause of a sale .which you want 
to make — in the interests of your 
company? If you can. then you are 



worry about your siicces; 

For it's the man .who perse_veres 
who wins — who goes back again and 
again until he kuows either that he 
positively cannot make a sale, or 
secures the. order he wants. It's the 
man with the nerve to take a licking 
and not whimper — to go back again 
and take whatever pun.shment or re- 
buff is to come, until' he gets the thing 
he's after — that wins. And, until 
you can develop this irait in your- 
self — until you can submerge self- 
interest or temperament in the inter- 
est of your company and in ordr to 
promote the sale of your product- — ■ 
you're not really a salesman. And 
you'll find yourself una'de to achieve 
any very worth-while goal, until you 
DO this. 

But — when you do — you've learned 
one of the cardinal' points of good 
selling — and ir should be easy tx> 
-rte.p from that to the goal you seek. 
CUI/riVATK PEUKEVKRAXCE 
AND STAMINA" AND DETERMINA- 
TION— APPLY YOURSELF WITH 
ALL YOUR MIGHT TO THE WORK 
OF WINNING— AND THEY CAN'T 
BEAT YOU ! ! 



There remained just one week of 
the campaign— I had left just one 
week in iwliich I knew that I must 
win or lose. And, frankly, I was 
down-hearted. Things hadn't come 
as well as they might have — I was 
farther bthind than I coui'd afford to 
be — or so I believed then. And — I 
WANTED TO WIN. So, I deter- 
mined NOT to stop — I promised my- 
self, that] no. matter how hard the 
last week's' grind, no matter how 
hitter th<j disappointment to come, I 
WAS GOING TO STICK RIGHT 
TILL THE END AND WORK ALL 
.THE TIME. . 

And 1 1 did. 

I had n?c a lot to do during the 
morning-j-raih had made it so mud- 
dy that there was little hope of get- 
ting very- far until the side roads 
had had a chance to dry a bit. So 
I hitched kip the roan mare and drove 
into -town, to talk to Mr, Searles, 
the town's biggest reaV estate operator 
who had I helped me' so much, I 
talked for nearly an hour — telling 
him' all tlie points of .my selling taik, 
telling him how I had failed miser- 
ably to succeed; during the past few 
days, and asking for his honest 
opinion as, to what was wrong, 
. "Mayb£ ypu l.et them get TOO 
MUCH INTERESTED, Bobby," he 
said. 

"too much Interested— why 

— I don't get you — how CAN they 
be TOO MUCH interested? I thought 
that was the only way I could sell! 
them subscriptions — by showing 
them my sample copies and ihe pre- 
miums tl at we're giving them." I 
was really at a loss— couldn't under- 
stand hin — but wanted information 
at once. 

"When I sell a man a piece* of 
real estate — I let him look it over, 
toil him ihe good points of it — and 
then take him back to the office to 
finish up the sale. You let your pros.- 
pects get ;o interested in the samples 
that they don't get half what you 
they get more interested 
your selling 



say — that 

in the sajmple than 

taik." 

It was 
new — and 



a new idea to me — very 
for a while it seemed al- 
most preposterous. But I knew that 
Mr. Searles was always— no, nearly 
alwUys— eorredt, aiul I Jechfed to 
giye_his_sugge.stion a fair trial' before 
I (Condemned it* 



FOR . YOUR NEEDS, IN THE 
WORLD! And your subscription will 
help me win a cor, in the big eim- 
pyign thai, they are conducting. With 
the yores which your -.ubscription 
\> ill give me, I may win — and I want 
to if : p*,s-ible. May I write your sub- 
scription receipt for tree years?" • 
'•Write it! How much money d' 

3011 Will!?" 

"Ten dollars, Mr. Groeller." . 

"All right. Here's your ch^ck — 
and luck to you!" 

That sale had been easy — ai'must 
too easy. But I determined tc use 
the 'same plan in other sales — and I 
found .that it really worked; All that 
it amounts to is an attempt to save 
the prospective. customer's time and 
breath — and yours as well. Where 
you can kill' a sale and lose a pros- 
pect, by talking too long, by allowing 
your prospect to become so interested 
in your sample a s to excVude thought 
of your proposal yon can gei the sale 
by the use of a little judicious flattery. 
a careful summary of -features, a 
convincing and emphatic arraign- 
ment of the fine points of your news- 
paper, or a convincing appeal for 
he'p on the grounds of mutual bene- 
fit. AND IF YOU DON'T BELIEVE 
IT WILL WORK— TRY IT!'. i 



Page Three 



(To Be Concluded Friday) 



a good salesman— and you need noiJ_£ Vhen H wnlke(1 int0 t,ie offices of 
i™.-™ nhnnf vn«r ci.oonct- \ufc Union Loan and Trust company, 

on the second floor of the First State 
bank, I carried nothing in my hand 
except my| hat. I had a sample copy 
folded and thrust into a pocket of 
my overcoat, however, and when I 



ot to Mr. Groeller, the man to whom 
I wished to speak, I - took out this 
sample and showed, it to him. 

He took it. looked at it, saw a fi- 
nancial ar:icle — Dun's forecast for 
tin* winter months — which pleased 
him. and started to read it.. I waited 



WHERE THERE'S A 
WILL 

(Note: This true story of a 
young man's great success, un- 
aided by riches or influence, in 
a campaign exactly similar to 
that now being conducted by 
The Tribune, and written by 
that young man several years 
ago, will appear in installment 
in this column daring the pro- 
gress of The Tribune's' great 

$3,600 campaign. READ IT 

DON'T MISS IT— IT HAS 



— not 
looked up 
quite get 



f. 



}ng a word. Finally he 
—for he naturally coudn't 
the idea of my silence. 
WYil, vhat have, you to say — ?" 
Until' ;-ou finish looking at the 
sample, si •, I've nothing to' say," I 
answered rery politely. 

The courtesy ' pleased him — and 
saved my breath. For when he turned 
around, afjter reading the arti<-n-, he 
was SOLD, without one word from 
me.- -I ' ■ 

"I'm asking' you to subscribe to 
7 lie World sir, for two reasons — 
first because your subscription will 
help me, and, second because it will 
help you. | The World carries a full 
market page and o strong financial 
review, eviry issue. The World £i*e s 
greater value for less money than 
any other paper of its size, published 
in this portion of the state — because 
it is published oftener. This means' 
that the, news^carried is fresher and 
more . up-to-date, the market quota- 
tions more accurate, the want ad- 
vertisements land safe ads more, com- 
plete and less distant. The World 
brings to you every bit of news that 
IS news, light when it is new. The 
World con es to you fresh and ci'ean 
', — honest and sensible and 
exaggeration. YOU (SET 



MINNESOTA MAN HEADS 

HORTICULTURISTS ASS'N 
M. J. Dorsejy fruit breeding . spe- 
cialist of. the Minnesota college of 
agriculture, has just been elected 
president of the Official Horticultur- 
ists Association of the Northern 
Great Plains, which held its third 
annual meeting at University Farm, 
Jaii'y G-S. This association is made 
up of representatives of state and 
national institutions in the north 
central states and in the central pro- 
vinces of the Dominion of Canada. 
While its members are interested in 
ail important horticultural problems, 
the great task which they have at- 
tacked is that of developing fruits, 
flowers, shrubs and trees hardy 
enough to stand the cold winters oi 
the northern plains. They are try- 
ing to solve this problem by all sorts 
of lahratory tests in order to deter- 
mine what constitutes hardiness in a 
plant, and by crossing of varieties, 
that are known to be hardy with 
commercial varieties in order to se- 
cure hardiness, coupled with size, 
flavor, beauty and keeping qualities. 
The success of their work means add- 
ed health, prosperity, and home com- 
forts for the people of the northern 
great plains. 



IQCALMAPKEES 



and reliabl 
free from 
THE FINEST PAPER POSSIBLE 



-~ I 



It Is Just as 

DANGEROUS 

j» ■ 

to be without adequate Tornedo insurance as it is 
fire.insurance. In the majority of cases fire losses 
are not total but when a tornado strikes, it means 
a total loss to eyerything in its path. 

We have on display in our bank actual kodak 
pictures of the Fergus Falls tornado of last year 
which shows clearly the enormous destruction of 
property in that town. 

Rate» Extremely Nominal ai fillowsi 
Dwelling housea and contents $4 per $ 1,000 for 31 Tears 
Mercantile buildings and contents $5 per 51,000 for 3 years 



First National 



Bank 



Thief River Falls, Minnesota 
Resources Over One Million Dollars 



lj ^ '.::■■ ■■_ ■'.■.-■* ■-- ■,..fr..6,'--U ftlh; ii£rf>,'.. ,;..<■. bj-vs.^ku, 



Hanson & Barzen 

Wheat, No. 1 northern, per bu. ?2.6G 

Wheat, No. 2 northern, per bu. 2.01 

Wheat, No. 3 northern per bu. 2.56 

Wheat, No. 4 northern, per bu. 2.30 

Durum wheat, No. 1, per bu. 2.64 

Durum wheat, No. 2, per bu. 2.01 

Durum wheat, No. 3, per bu. 2.56 

Durum wheat, No. 4, per bu. 2.49 

Oats, per bu. .S.'l 

H.ve, per bu. 2.03 

Barley, per bu. .1.02 
Flax, No. 1, per bu. ' 3.20 

Flux, No. 2 per bu. 3.15 

Bran, per cwt 2.80 

Shorts, per cwt. 2.90 

Tessum Seed, Grain & Supply Co. 

Cracked Corn, per cwt 3.70 

Whoie corn, per cwt. 3.60 

Hay, per bale 1.50 

Middlings, prr cwt. 2.90 

Oil meal 4.60 

Thief River Produce Co. 

Hens, light, per lb .14 

Heavy hens, per lb .18 

Boosters, per lb .10 

Turkeys, per lb .18 
Horse hides .03@.05 

Calf hides .15 

Horse hides .04 to .05 

Eggs, per doz. .30 

T.R. Cooperative Creamery 

Butter, per lb .56 

Bdtterfal, per lb .56 

Milk, per quart .10 



Wait!-- Don't Operate! 

Take Sto-li-gal, a doctor's prescrip- 
tion for dissolving gall stones, and 
complicated sotmach ailments. 

One box gives' instant relief in all 
cases of GALL STONES, liver and 
stomach trouble, such as indigestion, 
dyspepsia, chronic appendicitis, gas, 
sour stomach, ulcers, catarrh, pains 
in stomach and back, constipation, 
etc. Don't wait but get a box of 
Sto-li-gal from your druggist today. 
Price $1. Attention! No fake tes- 
timonials, but positive facts. Sto-li- 
gal has helped thousands of people 
ami it will positively give you relief 
in ail ailments mentioned regardless 
of your age. or duration of trouble. 
Write for free literature to Dept. F. 
Digestive Chemical Company, St. 
Paul, Minn. .» Sold in Thief Kiver 
Falls, by Dr. H. B. Newell, Lambert's 
Pharmacy, also leading druggists 
everywhere. 



Wm. J. BROWN 

■ Lawyer 

Formerly County Attorney 
Marshall County, 

Office Over First National 3ani 

Thief River Falli, Minnesot* 



avi(k< l ^ih^fe{^i^^ J;4V:^W.ia'-Ah^lL-... 



■MB 



Half old llachman and his 

DOLLAR BAND 




SECOND TRIUMPHAL TOUR 




HAROLD BACHMAN, Director 



30 Artists 

Real Americans 
Real Musicians 

5 Soloists, Every 

Member ,A 

Feature 




ROBERT BRUCE 
Indian Soloist 



Harold Bachman, Director of the Million Dollar Band, which is to play 
in THIEF RIVER FALLS, on Wednesday evening, JULY 21, has had 

a career which fits him admirably for the position he now holds as director 
of a big concert band. After graduating from college, where he specialized 
in music for a period of eight years, he played for several seasons- on the 
road with different concert organizations, among which was the famous 
Bohumir Kryl Concert Band of Chicago. 

Between seasons he studied his -chosen instrument, the cornet, with 
H. A. Vandercook of Chicago, and Mr. Vandercook counts Director Bach- 
man as one of his most successful pupils, using his name on all his adver- 
tisements for his cornet school. 

With this experience Mr. Bachman was well qualified to make a I 
name for himself as director of an army band, in which capacity he served 
for about two years before taking his own band on the road to enter into 
the commercial band business. 

The Duluth Herald has the following compliment to pay to the ab- 
ility of Director Harold Bachman: Those Who have heard the Mil- 
. lion Dollar Band at the Rex feel sure that they have seen one who 
. is to become one of the formost band leaders in the country. Con- 
ductor Bachman fairly gripped music from his finger tips and it 
is small wonder that his company of musicians did so well under 
his competent direction. • 

"Look Out Sousa," was the heading of an article in the Milwaukee 
News on the work of Mr. Bachman, who played to record-breaking 
audiences in the Miller Theatre of this city during the week of 
October 12th last season. 

Mr. Bachman says that his band this, year will be much better 
than ever before. 

Milwaukee News: "Look out Sousa! The Million Dollar Band 
is a Whirlwind." 

Billboard: "Good assembly, capable musicians, selections well 
played." 

Chicago Vaudeville: "This band is far above the average and well 
worthy of its place in Big Time Vaudeville." \ 

Minneapolis Tribune: "Conductor Bachman's Band has proved 

its right to be reckoned among the foremost bands of the country." > 

Dance at Auditorium 

immediately following concert. Music by 7-piece orchestra composed of 

members of this band , 

Free bus from bank corner to Squaw Point from 8 to 8:30 P. M. 

At Squaw Point 

Wednesday Eve., 
July 21st 

Admission: 25e and 50c 



>^ 




The Tribune 

SEMI-WBBKLY 



ESTABLISHED 1001 



Official County Paper 



Pennington Printing Company 
Publishers 



Tho«. A. Way, President 



"Published every Tuesday arid Friday 

at ' 

Tbief River Falls, Minn. 



B. B. McWHIlamg, Editor and Manager 



Foreisrn Advertising Representative 
THE AMERICAN PRESSASSOCIATION 



Entered aa second class matter at" the 
post office at Thief River Fails, Minn.,' 
■nder the Act of March 3, 1S79. 



Harlow Sruber lias 320 acres of 
flax out on the Angus road in Hel- 
gei'and township that is hard-to heat. 
The crop is all on new breaking. It 
is as even as a floor, a rich heai'thy 
color an<l v 'promf<es. a small fortune 
to the owner ihis year -Mr. Stuber 
did an exrepfioniii'ly good job of 
breaking and seeding and the result 
•\vili' he a great crop. Piax is. flax 
this year 



There \va : •{ leiralar parade Sun- 
day out to t' i'ettiesoii swee: ci'nvcr 

lield- on : : K > . , SreuHi IS Sanders 
hmii-diip. It"> -a sight worth seeing 
The e'.over -lands up there from six 
io Steven i'ir- hiiili. and ju-t as thick 
a< it '.-an -;;u:il. 5t .-hades the 
gr«n:!i.i i-.'-ni'.Mi'M-iy. i!n;- lceeniug our 
weed-- aiel- foul jjr.i.---. Sweet clover 
iiuio--u'a:e-; ;h.'"grramd i'"r ai'rtilfa 
and crh-.'-r u-ra-- es. It lireaily rtincSms 
liie s!:ii"::iel is a highly pn.iiiabi'e 
ereii ji/lvi- out a;i'l ?ee ihe Kott'.o- 
son er.'p. !>'> only, three and a liaiT 
nii!e^ ir.ini imvu Kvc:.*y business 
man in lown should >ee this •.■■rop. 



session is 
his party 



mabated'and he- caiSs "?bpon 
o make the Wilson treaty 



the paramount issue of^the present 
ei'ection. Could the unilateral slant 
or any question be more impressively 
drawn? 

But it is not on a vague theory 
that this < ountry is to vote this fall. 

We war t to solve some issues that 
are as pi'; in as pike staffs. 

We -war t to know once and for all 
time if this is to remain a Republic 
or if it is to be transmogrified into 
a unit of the International Soviets. 

We want to know if this govern- 



return to its proper sphere 
i and carry out the time- 



ment can 

of activit, 

honored mjnxiin of Jefferson, that the 

"least govjerened country is the best 

goverenedi" 

To find hope of safe and prompt 
solutions Jo these queries -*he voter 
turns to tne Chicago platform. There 
is no quibbling ■ auout the railroad 
question, Xor on any other vital sub- 
ject is tl ere evasion or deception. 
The voters are able to tell a real 
issue whet they see it and no amount 
of maudi'in seniimentaiity about this 
country i ot keeping its pledge is 
going to curry weight. . , 

In the 1'usiness world it is a prov- 
en rule t< depend for results upon 
men "of av *rnge ability and even torn. 



perm out l 



in theorists or men who alTeet great 
mental t s iperioriiy o\ J er their as- 
sociates. 
The tin 



pie, and 
person or 
Let the 

swoop for 



eiaistim; 



ours 



Th 


■ tiiu 


on 


} ii 


ch rain 


on Die 11th 


in<Iai 


r di 


\ a 


wori'd of 


good. The 


weal; 


er ' h 


as 


)ee 


i eool 


ill the time 


since 


.in* 


e: 


act 


Vy righ 


for crop-. 


S'JUie 




liti 


'S 


were s 


ifi'ering ifor 


rain. 


V.u. 


u the 


main we were just 


ready 


{•>>■ i 


ain 


W 


e got ir. 


The weath. 


or h: 


< In 


en 


;<U 


il since 


and crops 


i'otik 


inc. 




yi; 


ir is in 


full swing, 


with 


-OIIK 


vy 


' ii 


irvestc 


. 1'eiining- 


ton e 


iunt \ 


ts 


tr- 


nig to market, with 


the d 


mbh 


J)OX 


in this 


year. 



The nave! illio Thief Kivor Fulls 
from the west is de.om-ing north 0110. 
mile in the old road, and lias boon 
a'.l similiter. This is caused lariroi'.v 
by tiio trai-.Us hauling gravel to otlici' 
mads. 'J'lic sand pit is almost as 
near tho North road as to the .TeiTer- 
son. Some steps .should he taken 
to ionvct tliis I rouble. We would 
snggest that, the trucks haul on 'the 
North road especially when their haul 
is to the north. At- any rate the 
present condition is very bad. Trade 
is heing driven away from town, 
-local travel inconvenienced, and thru 
travel greatly annoyed. Here os a 
fine 'chance for the Jefferson officers 
or Merehanls association to do some- 
thin;: for the town. Tliis very bad 
link of three, miles in an otherwise 
good .road is had business and shoud 
be corrected. 



The school election Saturday was 
not largely attendeo. Mrs. L. (I. 
Larson received -14 votes. . E. 0. 
Mogonsen iili votes. Mrs. ,T. .T. Ilk-liter 
lit voles. Fourteen other candidates 
received scattering vutes. Tlie new- 
' Vy elccled directors enter upon their 
duties with the conlidenee o£. the 
people. 



1 



"I.E' 



I1AVK SI-'.HVAXTS" 



(From .he World's Business 1 

llKsonie way it is iioped that: the 
unity of the Kcpubk-an party can be 
broken, '['hi = is the hope of denioc- 
ra<-y and ii shows upon what a slen- 
der thread hangs the chance of this 
division of tlw iiosrs being reali'/.e'd. 
The lo'itni.H. tins are united for the 
same reason that tho members of a 
ship v.-ii'. act together to attain a 
common pn'-pose. 

It litis been clear to everyone who 
pretends to read the. signs of the 
t times that bushiest -men. artjsians 
and the great majority of agricultur- 
ists are eager to see .a change in tile 
'Federal adiniiwsiration. This is nor 
due to partisan likes n v dislikes, but 
. to a full appreciation of the. fact that 
tin- Wi't-oti policies have led this 
ciiuntry. not only up to. the threshold 
of <o:-!a';ism. but beyond Ihe portal. 

Wo. have seen the "close-up" pic- 
ture of jndi-striausni in the manage- 
'lltt -.ii of the taihoad-t. 

Wc luiv • seoti ilio tterl'iei'ous plan 

of uivintr intbitc t-ontiiicts on ;l cost 

. plus !>a.-:s. tmil w'c h::n> had the nn- 

p!ea-;t:t: c::;tr:e;i; f living under 

an ililminis-ra.ioii that hat done 
nothing elT'-t-uvt lo tileck Ihe high 
cos: of tivit g. With tilings as ever- 
. present e t-.nenis of ol'r 'daily life 
ami with .:fX' littnltit- tiitit cannot lie 
inert ased without h'eiug t-onliscatory 
the voters of the country are ready 
to record iheir verdict.' 
, The mil ter of ngiit ami wrong as 
ir et'ue: : this couniry is not- to he 
.setiied by calling -apoi'. t. ; to redeem' 
tlie p'edge of f'resi-.leiil Wilson on 
;he Treaty of Peace ami League of 
Nations. In the firs! lo'tice. he acted 
upon his own initiative and against 
all precedent, in going to Europe to 
—projo'-t his rj.^rsona'f topinions into 
the l'ea-e Conference. Then upon 
his return from hi s second .pilgrim- 
age he psTsistcd in demanding that 
the i'nitcd States Senate be bullied 
into vo(/ing for the treaty. Even now, 



iither than place reliance 



has 'come for Ihe L'nited 
Slates to again be govei-ened by laws 
administered by servants of the peo- 
not by one-iiian rtti'o in 
hrougli- satelliles. 
ftil'i election make a clean 
the Chicago platform and 
candidates. This will be the best 
the people, can have that 
pea<-o -and progres s under 
mil government will be 



The Minneapolis .ChtinlSer'^it Com- 
merce ^mmenced^traciiiig^iii 'wheat/' 
The opening prick; was $2.73 peti 
bnsheL;; DniMg tte^war the farmer 
was p^eventei -Sy the government 
from getting the market price and 
during the period of world shortage 
of breadstnffs the farmer took half 
price for his grain. He wag 
deceived by the Wilson "guarantee/ 
Now in the face of the greatest 
wheat crop ever raised the Chamber 
of Commerce pays ?2.73 and by the 
way the Chamber of Commerce need 
not take any credit for being de- 
cent to the farmers, for they are notj 
Next to the Wilson administration 
they are the farn.r's worst enemy, 
They are paying $2.73 because the 
wheat has a natural vai'ue of much 
more and because they only partly 
control the price. 



The sum and substance of the 
democratic platform holds the party 
and the candidate ^o the Wilson 
league of nations. The republican 
platform denounces the Wilson 
league and the republican -nominee 
declares against it. Thus, for the 
purpose of the average voter, the 
choice maybe made as follows: Doe: 
the voter favor the covenant shaped 
at Paris? If so, he should - vote, the 
Democratic ticket. Does he oppose 
it? Then he should vote the Ttepnb 
i'ican ticket. The amendment to the 
platform forced thru by Senator 
Walsh, of Massachusetts, does not 
alter the.' fact that the democratic 
party 1ms committed itself wholly to 
the covenant; but it opens the way 
to evasions during the campaign, ami 
enables democratic senators to set up 
the c'aim that they have stood in 
iinc with their par.y while favoring 
reservation s --making clearer tlie cb- 
liara;i..iis of the United Stales." — 
The WasMngion Tost. 



Don't fail to be in town when the 
special train bearing the 



posters from St. Paul 

"The Home Market of the Great Northwest" 

come here on their great 

Annual Trade Tour 

accompanied by the 

FAMOUS MINNESOTA STATE 
BAND 

which gives a free concert well worth hearing 

Come — Attend the reception, hear the band, shake v -, 
hands with the representatives of St. Paul's 
Manufacturers and Jobbers 

Free Souvenirs for the Children 
Conle one, come all, and share in the fun at 

Thi^f River Falls, Saturday July 31 

Special Train Arrives at 
. ' 7:45 A.M. 










I wish to onl attention to the 
ordinance relating: to bicycle riding 
on the .sidewalks. .Boys persist injr 
in- tlii.s practice will be brought be- 
fore-the Municipal Court of thi s city. 

Several complaints have been made 
to me about the constant robbing of 
flower beds. If this practise is not 
stopped steps whl be taken to dis- 
• cover ami punish all persons indulg- 
ing in such pastime. 

E. O. ERICKSON, 
Chief of PoVice 



Which One of These 
Will WIN 



EVERYONE of the contestants listed below is a hqt con- 
tender for the Buick 'Six' first grand prize, and for the 
other eleven prizes to be given away by the Tribune on July 31, 
in the great $3,600 automobile campaign which is now drawing 
near a close. Every one of these contestants is in to win — is 
working hard and working all the time, right now — because of 
the exceptional generosity of the prize offer made. 

Your favorite candidate is listed among them. » Help your 
favorite. win the Buick 'Six' by subscribing with him or her right 
now! 



District No. One 



Harry Lund, city (intuitu) 

Mrs. Kdv.-in O. Ei-h-itson. city iIiN.Ontl 
O. L. .Cioiittti-oin. city .... t;ii:l.o<Mi 
Mis. I.. Ileimanson. city . . 10.000 
llohon Ilai'voi-son. city .... 422.000 
Leo Miller, city . . . .\ 10.000 



KM). 



l.ae'hi lViors..n. 
Mrs. II. !■-. I'„.iv, 



District No. Two 



Hetty .Tolinson, Holt TiO.000 

Sylvia Pieison, Sr Ilihihe oi;."i.0;10 
Martha A.liin. riuinniei- . . (!:;:;. 000 
Ethel Anderson, Wylie .... Oo.OOO 
BorghiM' Hers. Middle Itivei- lfl.OOf) 
Ml-s. 1-1. Stntrer. Erie ....... (ioO.Ooo 



Oiimler Tviet Oohlen 'Yat'oy .lotl, into 
Arthur o.'soit. Middle Iiiver- lO.tioti 
Emma Anderson. Middle Kivc-r lo.ooo 
II. (>. Noi-hy. (oiodridtte .... 11". Out) 
Mr-. (.'. E. I.tintlt:ri.'n. Yikint: dit.tliio 



Support Your Favorite— Subscribe Now! 



r 









Overland Sedan Averages 27.6 Miles Per 
Gallon in Los Angles- Yoscmite Run 



THE OVERLAND SEDAN \ is proving to owners 
everywhere the advantages of closed-car summer 
motoring. A permanent top keeps off sun and rain; 
plate glass windows shut out wind and dust. And , 
now the 355 mile Los^ Angeles-Yosemite Economy 
Run shows remarkable fuel average of 27.6 miles 
per gallon— a striking endorsement of this Sedan's- 
economy and the riding^qualities of Triplex Springs. 



orthwestern Auto Co 

K. A. Sundahl, Prop. 



V, 



t'Wi, U---n^^-!&-A\h^X-J^iii»^U'»^^^^r^a 



iiniji^it-jai^w -j. xsi^ 




TUESDAY, JULY ao, 1910 



HIGH GOrSHDE IS 
PINCpGJHEB FEET 

BOSTON IFINANCIER SAYS SPEC- 
ULATORS WHO- BOOSTED 
LEVEL NOW ARE VICTIMS 



p—i 



^ 



-4 



Speculators whose manipulations 
in world's market brought the period 
of highest prices known in history- 
are in turn being forced to disgorge, 
with the result that: a gradual return 
to normal conditions is already under 
way in the opinion of WilCam A. 
Paine of Boston, founder and presi- 
dent of Paine, AVebber & Co., who 
was in the Twin Cities recently. 

The stock market has already 
gone thru the process of liquidation 
and returned to a condition approach, 
injr normal following the inflation of 
all securities caused by war time and 
reconstruction activities and the 
comiiKitllty market is now entering 
upon a similar liquidation, Mr. Paine 
cI.'i-V:ii-im|. 

'Mr. l'iiine would not venture to 
pre'l'rt wlici i lie process of liquida- 
tion would i" completed and declar- 
ed it would In- to tile interest of the 
entire i-mmtr.v'to have the readjust-- 
. liiont ir!:!i;u:ii 'file pre-war i'evo! of 
:.:-;,•(. s js J, 1. IjkHy over to be reached, 
In- aid. mi-:!i» to the. facr that ihe 
nhuoriua! conditions, row in its finm' 
pha-e !ia- lu-i-iuiiht about a liiu'her 
levid of wa.ues tlirur nt ihe ilidf.s- 
trinl livid. 

Mr. I'aitie said Mint in his. opinion 
there is no reason why Xew h'ne> 
hmd sliouid i-eeejvii a priur'ty .riirlit 
.- 1 1 i 1 u 1 1 . ■ 1 , ( - r,r eoa! t'jTim mines, jioinf- 
inu' on, ;iia Nov KnirV.'iinl can re- 
ceive its coal by water the entire 
year. \vhi:e shipments to tile north- 
west are impossible alsor December 
1. lie said thin the olosine; n f I'ae- 
mries. in Xew Kngiand. .■wlileli is al- 
ready -under way wit; uinlimbteilly 
work -10 the lienelit of- tile Xorthwes: 
by diveriinir eoai to (Irs section. 



We'd, 
amount 6 
index to 
What wodl'd 



l3-j*^f^r^T^^^^i^^i!^^^^t^^?7^J^5H*^^^ 



^^rr 



THE TRIBUNE 



V 



bate to think .that, the 

f hair" a man 'possess is an 

the quality of his conrageC 

he say to our baldheads ? 



Life he Ids a barrel of joy -for yon 
if you wt int it. But it expects you 
to pull the plug out of the buhghoYe! 



The 
of: ideas 
tude has 



young -man with a multitude 
iften ; finds that .his mui'ti- 
jeconie but a Jninble.! 



PEACE 



E ARMY 
TO LEARN FARMING 



WAR DEPARTMENT PLANS TO 

TEACfi SOLDIERS ALONG 

PRODUCTIVE LINES 



of the country, and to encourage the 



ba«k^tha^rm,mpvemen|;^^ IcampB?-': Ifsjs Jiftnn^jjext fall greatly 
JCSHiirRWrntng- Camp«ig«^L£]L.ajr : aimrge-an'd^acteBfctbe scope ,.ot 



-Washington, D. C, July 14 — In 
line- with the war department's plans 
to make the peace time army of the 
intelligent, productive en- 
tity, as well ^s a fighting machine, 
agricultural' ciiiurses are. now flourish- 
ing in several of the large canton- 
ments ol the army, incftiilinj 
Camp Dnlge, the military reserva- 
tion On tl e fringe of Des Moines. 
The course of study at Camp Dodge 
truck, fanning, horticulture 
fruit, i ul. tire, agronomy or grain 
culture, fpi'iii mechanics, and farm 
which Includes courses in 
.' "and zoology, 
isive c'Mii'-e in animal bus- 
it ii horses, cows, piirs and 
s the feature subjects, is 
tnuydii. As tile army en- 
ways . to ire: the best 
innrerinis. the best breeds 
pigs and chickens are 
being .sen 10 Camp Dodge. 



include 



economic 
enromo'oc 
-\n o.vti 
liandry, \\ 
chickens 
a-o heincj 
(leavers a 



Tli 

includes e 
to inarke 
u'ations < 



Pertinent Paragraphs 
A word to iho/wise is siiflicient 
To ilie foot' it is one too inanv. 



conipo.. itio 



The recent decision of the war de- 
partment to curtail recraiting cam- 
paigns, in rural communities in order 
that the present farm labor situation 
wil'f not be made more serious, has 
brought forth the commendation of 
■the numerous farm organizations. 

"Recognizing the extreme, .impor- 
tance, of jagricnltorff, 1. pqlQ^O. S. 
Barrett,^ president bf the 1 National 
Board." of Farm Organizations, "the 
war department is hot only refrain- 
ing from attempting to secure en- 
listments among farm hands, but is 
doing all in its power to increase 
knowledge of agriculture among the 
men in the army and thus induce 
them to go on farms upon the com- 
pletion of their,; enlistments.! With 
this end in view, a number of 
thorough courses in agriculture, 
combining class-room instruction and 
practical field work, have been es- 



tablished In the larger military. 



this wort In line. ,5yltb. the army's 
present policy,. of returning inen'io' 
civil life more usernf 'citbiehSHand' 
fitted to earn a -betters-living,, every 
school in' 1 which :not Ottiyi.js genera/ 
education .offered, -,but. instruction " in 
trades isrcarried.on.' The agnctiiturai 
schools have taken a very 1 important 
place in this scheme of instruction. 

"The! future army wffl not spend 
a part I of the day in drill a,nd the 
remainder in, idleness. A nation's de- 
fense consists of something more 
than an army that can shoot straight, 
ride hard, manipulate an airship or 
bomb a town. A defensive army must 
be an army that can produce food 
as welt as repulse an army' of in- 
vasion a'nd to this end it is the policy 
of the war department to make 
farmers of as many recruits as can 
by any means be induced to adopt 
the profession of agriculture." 



n-se at Camp Dodge also 
densivo knowledge on how 
the product.,, tho the reg- 
iccitically stipulate that 



the products can not bo inaced 



111 



1 with outsid 




Yon can call some peop'e -hard 
niuiuis wjilnni/ insulting them, tho 
y/11 niaV give deadly offense. Tlli 
trulli >sXnever an insult. 

A man /-an always dictate Jo his 
typewrite-/, but seldom to his wife. 

A gijl may not enthuse much over 
tile man, but it's no trouble at- all 
to go'inlo raptures over tile engage- 
ment ring. 

/['ho small boy with a hook, A 
liile and a worm is never without 
oy. It is good for a nibble or two. 
It's no disgrace for. a brave man 
to admit that he lias been licked by 
a better man. Only the craven tries 
to bluff it out afterwards. 



Classified Wants 



PAINTINC AND I'Al'KIUlANIilXi;, 
and interior ■ decorating. First 
class work. Prices reasonable. — 
r.akken "& Sherstacl. phones 4(1-13 
or -113. ■ . '. tt. 

WANTKI) — A TWENTY tilt TAVEX- 

"tj^rwo inch breaking plow with 

truck. .,sigurd , I.itid, fit. Iliinire. 

■ Minn. f ■ 3S-2 

WA'XTKD — lilltr. FOIt" riENEKAL 
iiousework 'Mrs. Ni. T. McFarland, 
307 Knight; avc. X. 3S-tf 

FOK SALE — TlIKEHHIXi; OUTFIT 
coiiiiiieie for work. Hooves engine 
and Reeves 1 separator .'id-till with 
garden city wing feeder Engine 
is a -M'-SO irus tractor witli -WO 
gaiion gas tank , intuited on truck, 
s botioiii siubie jianvs. also brack- 
ers. a good outfit for someone that 
wnijrs 10 u'O tlireshing. For imr- 
ticulars write or call on me. r>. .T. 
I'.akke. Thief .River Fai's. Minn. 

FOR HAI.E-i-f7 HOWS AND 3 

spring calves. May consider team 

of yom.g horses or car. Tandrup 

Saltvcdr. Ilighliiviu'ng. 3(i-4pd 

,' LOST— IiETWKK.V i;i:i) LAKE 

Fabs and Thief .River Falls, chillis 

_^ black silk coat on Saturdtiy. July 

] Id. Finder return, to Hazette office. 

Red Lake Fabs. for reward 

ROOM' FOR RIOXT AT 42.3 MAIN" 

> / avenue. _■''': ' 3G-3pd 

. GOOD YOrXO- HOHSM FOR" SALE 

Hh'.iii if taken at once. Inquire 

I'.enon Rarber Shop. 2t 

HAY .S'I'n'.VlI'AGE OX. SEVERAL 
quarters near Goodvidjre for rent. 
Fir<t & I'eoples state Bonk Ito-tf 



USED CARS FOR SALE 
Buick Mode C ; 2o.. •overhauled; 
repainted and new cord tires 9700. 
_Ford. late models 'ciiuipped with 
shock absorber and iYale lock ?4",o. 
Marion ■ delivery car, sacrifice price 
?300. ' T-lnipire Speedster. 5 wire 
wheels, new tires., a sacrifice, at ?S0O. 
Ste.ude tractor attaciiment for 
Ford. Brand new. pulls two plows 
this attaciiment sells for .$230. Our 
price tor quick sale $130.00. 

Overland 7o. Overhauled, new 

_v batteries and a bargain at .$475.00. 

'*,^ tlulcl),lkpl ' <>• overliaui'ed 1017 mod- 

■'~:el. Car traveaed less than 000 miles 

i! ?875. 

g These ears can be seen at the E. 
s .; C. Parsons Auto Co., Warren, Minn. 



interests, 
are Iargo- 
the state 
I colleges. and include, 
have had extensive ex- 
its successful practical 



.Instructors at. the camp ni 
\v made 11:1 of graduates of t 
•igrictii'iur 
-.111 u win 
fierience 
farmers. 

"The airieultural Classes ;it Camp 
Dodge." slid an oliicer of Ihe 
era! stuff of the war department 
"ranks w th the best that the 
army has. Tlie men there are pro 
ducing considerable, which helps to 
make the post self-supporting a s far 
as mess is concerned. The army 
hopes tlirit these agricultural courses 
to aid in relieving the farm situation 



Help Wanted 



The J. C. Penney Company, who expects to open 
Store 306 in Thief River Fails in August, are looking; 
for some people to help conduct this business. ■ They 
are open for applications to fill the following; places: 

One able, clean young man. with 
some experience in these lines, who 
'■ait oualil'y for the stringent require- 
ments of the organization, wdio can 
speak the. Scandinavian nmguagc. 
who can appreciate an opportunity 
and make good use of if. (Xo u<er 
of cigarettes need apply.) 

One intelligent, dependable young 
lady to act as cashier. 

One experienced lady for ready-to- 
wear and dry goods. 

One young lady who desires to 
become a real efficient store woman. 

The manager will be in Thief 
River Fails'" about August 1st, and in- 
terview applicants, • 



Written applications may in the meantime be 
addressed to Mr. E. W. Hinrichs, care of J. C. 
Penney Co., Crookston, Minnesota. 



Page Five 



Why We Are Coming to 
Thief River Falls 

FIRST OF ALL, WE WILL BE HERE 

TO STAY 



R 



iver 



quic 
oft 
and 
fill; 



Out\ investigation of conditions in and about Thief 

Falls has convinced us that the majority of people will 

kly appreciate the advantages offered to them by the service 

lis store. With new goods, always lowest prices every day 



afe<?iife?l'^«i!i^Kaair?, 



conscientious service at all times— this "different" store will 
long felt want in the community. 



People who have heretofore "sent away" for mer- 
:handise will find it will pay them to travel hundreds of miles if 
necessary, to partake of every day values we offer. 

Make us a visit for proof. You will be quickly 

convinced "THIS IS THE STORE FOR 

EVERYONE" 




fe^Sfoaaktefta 



^i! ; WIM™m^ 



SffOM t 



fatrt^&^l^^t^l 



to Rent 



Five or six room room modern or partly modern 
house witfaa yard, by permanent occupant. To move 
in August 1st or at once. 

Reply to M. C. Burns, or write ' 

E. W. HINRICHS, Crookston, Alinn. 
Care of J. C. Penney Co. 



f 



JpiPl 

iJ /N\;.iJv:V^-:v:.. : 
A \ \ V/*'.- ■■.■>;•<' 

(J ii»ux »gi;i1 
f![[ / T «S t\.-i 






The Right Equipmcr 



it. 



f '. 



Your Picnic a Del it 



-hr 



npi-IE men folks msy say tlit?y';v v.j'i ;..::! : .>;:- 
lar about their meals, but you know 'ii;; : : 
"the better the service the boiler l':e j .'.. ■■■.[<■" 
is how it turns out. 

We know just what is wanted. :;inl niir : : uek 
of dainty and practical Picnic Utilities i, -1.111- 
plete. Let us serve you. 

Bottem Hardware Company 
the WWCfflSmi STORE 



f-aiwawgHB 



zaj 




How Spinal Defects ^a:ur 

MANY persons have sisTcod ho-.v ll.-o s;>in > ■-.-.> r.-i-i 
nerves and shut o!T tho liie-g:-.-ltnr'"i- t -.:■■ 
Tveakuess and dise;:-'.> in I'l'lain iinri, -oi' ii:.' i i . 
f.i;l!.e profits the s : >::-;il <;\ 
cord tiii'iiityli v.-iiieh '.i'^S; 
enoi-fry iJii--.--s'!'r.-iti f.\.-. /:■;.' ['"\ 
bruin- to lite net-v.-ur!; ;"*:=; '. 
of ncrv:;. - 1 > ; i '- :::-•:•-' - -'.''.. •''-''; 
&i). everv n,:r; •'.■' iiie '■:■■; -.-. tv. ■■ 

V\\ ,::■ Kl ■:;; r :,: ■ .-> 

/ .s.'iifvali! ::!"V.:i .-;... 

that are easily il;s!i:,,e;-d iii..' ;.i- i:-ju;e lo .. 
and jar. 

Cci-ses of ins mas -Prsscir:':-' 

lit faet liiere ar-> matiy •-•otitrilnii.iry 1 ■ :!:]"■•. .: ■■-.-.- ;■-- 
dei'eeiire sph.i-K a:;.! tin-;- ■!.-■• >_■■•■'■■■ ■- ■'•■■■ry'.l.i.v .-.' 
fiif't, liarin;;' at.-l .-!:':••!• idr'h ;!:.! .v.-. .:'; a.; I .. : . 
\i ry easi!;.: ati ' '-''-'i. 'in- .nn :;if :■ ! , ..'..'..: 

ti.roi.-. th. sjiit."- 0-. • i' ; ■•-■ '■,. 'i - : ■ ':■ ■'.'. -;s .ilm 
pressure njimi 'hr ia-:-v- -.:■!•■'. •■■•! \ :-■',:■ t ■')-,! nir. .■ j 
giving nerve r-.t-. i-i.-.'.: :, .:■:■ ; ;.. *. j i 1. ; 3 - ! , disen-.j. 

CMfcrKnui i„- ^:.,:o J i.; .-.:. , .f,t;J, ?jf:'. ■. . . 
It lifts the prosit;!'-' ;':m:.l '■'>.-.■ -.; ;-vi:-, :_• ■•i-mii I ■_; !.■ 

(^W^V out a;:,: di-as-l i :-■..,:; /: , g ''"; 
^J 2t* an.-t <:r K a::.:. AVitli :.n--al ^MV; 



tx 



:-.,:■-.: s.l, 



eKi^-J. 11'.!".l- jtitli 

1 r Y 

h&0j& -a ill re !;:-.]:,'; a!:out 



V) 









. ' ; ri.^Ai.I,". ; 



no arum's or surje-iv n?c- T;- 1 .-.^-.!. .'_..:';: r-> 1 ,:':-r):,i, : 
in Nature's o-..-;i v.-:.--. J,i--.^: i^:^ ; i-. v-,.-' r :; - ,; „• 
to Chiropractic (KI-liO-PIJAK-'IIC). j.eur.-i T.liai 



Palmer Graduate 

Over First National Bank 
Phone 107 Thief River Falls 







Neighborhood 



Contributed by The Tribune's Widehlwake Correspondents 



GERMANTOWN 

The sad news reached us that our 
dear friend Emma Haggy passed 
away ' at the sanatorium in ThieSf 
Biyer Falls Thursday, after an illness 
of several' months. Deceased was 
eighteen years old and will be very 
much missed at her home and 
among her many friends. Rev. H. 
Bjornson, of Boothsey. conducted the 
funeral services on Monday after- 
noon. Heartfelt sympathy is ex- 
tended to the parents and relatives in 
their sorrow. 

Mrs. Martinus Johnson was a 
caller at Goodridge last Saturday. 

Gladys' Roler was a caller at Ger- 
mnntown one day last w'eek. 

Miss Hannah Weber visited with 
Stella Philipp last Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Boyce and chil- 
dren visited at the A. Rohrer home 
Sunday. 

Mrs. Hans Dnhl visited at the 
Martinus Johnson home Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Olaf Tharaldson and 
children, Geiiart and' Suva, visited at 
the L. Bejidicksou home Monday. 

Bjarne Jorstad was a Sunday 
guest of Hans Johnson. 

Miss .Silva Bendicfcson was a Ger- 
mantown caller' one day last week. 

Hans Dahl' was a caller at the 
Martinus Johnson home one day last 
week, 

Mr. and Mrs. Olaf Tharaldson and 
children, Silva Gehart and Henry, 
were callers at the L. Bendickson 
home Sunday evening. - 

Mrs. Harry Weber and children, 
Violet and Hannah, were guests at 
the Philipp home Thursday. 

. Mr. andJMrs. C. Nelson and chit 
dren, Verral, Edith and Clifford, 
were, guests at the L. Bendickson 
home Thursday. 

Miss Bertinn Haggy spent Thurs- 
day afternoon at Thief River Pails. 
Bernard, Nettie and Silva Bendick- 
son motored to Mavie Saturday eve- 
ning. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Boyce and chil- 
dren called at the A. Ehorer home 
Sunday. 

Hattie Kloekmnn was a German- 
town caiicr one day last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Olaf Tharadson and 
children, Gehart, kilva and Henry, 
motored to Goodridge Monday eve- 
ning. 

Bernice Struble visited with Buth 
Boyce Monday, 

Mrs.- C. Struble was a Sunday 
guest at the Henry Boli'er home. . 

Bernard, Nettie and Silva Ben- 
dickson motored to Goodridge last 
Sunday evening. 

Guests at the Longevan home Sun" 
day were: Misses Emma Rosett, 
Eleanor ('uminings, ! Messrs. Edwin 
Rosett and Agi'and Curamings. 



JVebus 



Falls is visiting for a few days with 
his uncle, A. ('. Voiseth here. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Johnson and son, 
Earl, of Thief River Fails, were Mon- 
day Visitors at the Mr. and Mrs. 
Emil Anderson home. 

Mrs. JAxel AxeVson is reported 
considerable better the latter part of 
the week and the doctors are giving 
fair hopes of a complete recovery. 

The first doctors whose diagnosis 
was that of external blood poisoning, 
is succeeded by that of Dr. Melby 
who states that it is a case of Rosen 
fever. I 

There win be services at the Con- 
gregational . churcb at Rosewood 
next Sunday. at 10:30 a. m. and at 8 
p. m. The Young Peoples Society 
will meijt at the church on Saturday 
evening, July XT, when "lunch will be 
served at . the close. Everybody is 
welcome. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henuiug Backi'iind 
and family from Strathcona were 
Sunday visitors at the Carl Meilem 
homo south of town. , 

Joel and Mary Shoberg spent 
Sunday jafternoon at Holt as guests 
with th4 Martin Strom family. 

Messrs Oison and Anderson, two 
relatives] of Mrs. A. Axelson arrived 
last Thursday from Wannaska for 
a brief "isit at the Axelson home. 



CAMPHOR AND WITCHHAZEL 

HELP WEAK EYES 



Xhief River Falls people are aston- 
ished at the quick results produced 
bv simple witchbazel, camphor, Hy- 
drastis, etc., as mixed in Lavoptik 
eye wash. In one case of weak and 
near-sighted eyes a few days use brot 
great improvement. In another case 
It stopped eye pains and inflamma- 
tion. We guarantee a small bottle 
of Lavoptik -to help ANY CASE of 
weak, strained or inflamed eyes. 

t-3 



■-,■».: 1 



■•r~ ROSEWOOD 

About a dozen Bosewood families 
motored out to the Alberts farm 
three mii'es east of town last Satur- 
day evening to tender Mr. and Mrs. 
Thompson, a new family who has 
recently purchased land two miles 
south of town and intend v to make 
their future home in this community 
n welcoming surprise. IThe evening 
was delightfully Spent in conversa- 
tion and dancing and a dainty lunch- 
eon brought alnog , by the women 
was served at midnight. A massive 
solid oak sewing rocker was left with 
Mr. and Mrs. Thompson as a remem 
brance of the event. As there are 
no buildings on Mr. Thompson's land 
he is renting the Alberts residence 
until lie has the opportunity of erect- 
ing suitable home quarters. The com- 
munity is glad in welcoming ail new 
settlers into their midst, and espec- 
ially so, young and enterprising folks 
like, the Thompsons. What we need 
is more people on the farm s and a 
more d^isely setti'ed farming dis- 
trict, with a co-operative congenial 
spirit prevailing It will' build up the 
community and bring on universal 
prosperity. Glad to welcome you, 
Mr. and Mrs. Thompson, may your 
stay be pleasant and of a long dura- 
tion. 

Miss Jenive Swcnsqn left last Sat- 
urday for Badges where she will 
visit, with friends and relatives for 
sonfe. Umel 

■ ! Mr. and Mrs. Benhard Banum and 
ch'iVdren, Stanley and Harry, motored 
to Roseau last Sunday to visit among 
relatives during the day. 

Mrs. Nels Holm of Twin VaL'ey 
and Mrs. J. W. Bowman and infant 
daughter, of Soudan, arrived here the 
middle of the week for a weekend' 
visit with the A S. Holm folks in 
town. 

Mr. and Mrs. John B'.'om and sons, 
Arthur and Helmer, spent Sunday* 
at Middle Biver with the J. Blom- 
quSst family. 

Selmer Severson, of Thief Biver 



Meeting July 24th 

The Alinnesota Public Health as- 
sociation will hold a meeting at the 
Auditorium in this city on Saturday, 
July 24.1 Dr. Pearce, child special- 
ist of St. Paul, will be present and 
conduct pie clinic. All mothers are 
invited to-be present and bring the 
children to this clinic. 



First 



W. SWEDENBERG 



P lysician and Surgeon 

Eyes Tested and Glasses Supplied 

Special Attention Paid to 

Eyes;, Ears, Nose and Throat 



Phone 350 

National Bank Building 



NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 

Sealed proposals will be received 
at the office of the County Auditor 
of Pennington County, Minnesota, 
nutil 2 o'clock P. M. Aug. 3rd, 1920, 
fo r the construction of Jobs number 
20:05, 20:06 and 20:07 consisting 
of the following: 

Job No. 20:04 
located on State road No. 4 near the 
SE corner of Section 36 Town of 
Sanders, involving the construction of 

One AV 64 Standard concrete Box 
Culvert 24 ft. long, involving 

Be-euforcing steel 1333 lbs. 

Class "A" concrete' 22.0 cubic 
yards. *• 

2 in. pipe raining 100 lbs. 
Job No. 20:05 
located on State road No. 4 near the 
SE corner of Section 36, Town' of 
Smiiey consisting of the construction 
of - . 

One W106 Standard concrete Box 
Culvert 24 ft. long, involving . 

Re-enforciug steel 2693 ibs. 

Class "A" concrete ,4594 cubic 
yards 

2 inch, pipe railing 260 lbs. 
Job No. 20:06 
located on State road No. 3 on line 
between Sections 27 and 34, Town 
of Numedal, consisting of the con- 
struction of 

One W104 Standard concrete Box 
Culvert 24 ft. long, involving 

Re-enforcing steel 2291.2 lbs". 

Class "A" concrete 37.78 cubic 
yards • ' . 

2 in pipe railing 260 lbs. 
1 Job No. 20:07 

located on line between Sections 29 
and 32, Town of Numedal, on State 
road No. 3, consisting of the con- 
struction of 

One W 84 Standard concrete Box 
Culvert, involving 

Be-enforcing steel 1760.8 lbs. 

Class "A" concrete 28.96 cubic 
yards 



2 in pipe railing 115 lbs. 

Plans and specifications may be 
examined at the ofllce of the County 
Auditor at Thief Biver Falls, Min- 
nesota, or at the ofllce of the State 
Highway Department, 920 Guardian 
Life Bldg., St. Paul, Minnesota. 
Blue print plans may be. obtained 
from the State Highway Department 
at bidders expense. The right is 
reserved to reject any or all bids and 
to waive any defects. Bids must 
be accompanied by a. certified check, 
payable to the County Treasurer, 
for at least 5% of thee amount of 
the proposal. 

County Auditor 
Pennington County. 
July 20-27 A 3 



* * t M M M M M I ) M M M M M M M ♦ » M M M M M It M M » < 

Look At It in Any Way 



Thief River Tire Shop 

he home of PENNSLYVANIA TIRES 

Ijxpert Vulcanizing and Tire Repairing 
Tire Accessories 



W. A. CLAY, PROPRIETOR 

313 Main Ave. North 



♦♦♦♦♦» 



'" t i nmm i M m i mm 



BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE 




Lawrence Mg. Co. 



215 

MMM t 



Main Ave. N. 



,1...-,. .- ■-, f ■ .-•- ■■■> 



'■'i.;. 



k 



we advise and urge you to 
call on us once and secure ' \ ' 
a fire insurance policy. We 
will guarantee to place your '.\ 
insurance in force with the - 
best company Immediately. 
Insure your bouse, your * ■ 
furniture, fittings, wearing ; ! ! 
apparel, etc. 



Phone 443 
♦ MM I H H t l l ll l lim t M 1 , \ , ,, ' , | M , - , ■' , 1 1 f 



I 



v; - : •■■-..-. ::,'*;."->>A^* i < k^ ^/^^ ' i S s&^^^ ^,^^jL 



m 



Hemstitching 
MRS. McKINNEY 

Scandia Block 
'Phone 252 
Hours 10 to 12; 1 to 5'. 



our milk is the very best you 
can use in your household. 
First, because of its absolute 
purity and sanitary cleanli- 
ness. Next because of its 
superior richness and there- 
fore in nourishing quality. 
Finally because in spite of 
its admitted superority in 
every way it will cost you 
no more to use it. Why not 
at least, then, irive it a 
trial? 



Thief River Co-Operative"Creamery 
Associaion 

THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINN. 

' HI I IMMIIIHI I IIIIIIIHIIIII I IIII I IIll^ 




When you think of printing, think of 
The Tribune— Printing, that pleases 



UWili'i^^ 



JWfflO 




for Highest Possible gjwlity at Lowest Passible Price 



TX/TANY a smoker thought the limit had. 
" A - V - U - been reached. Could cigarettes be im- 
proved? We thought so. We knew there was 
room at the top for a better cigarette. But it 
would have to be something entirely new. 

And it is — it's Sour. 

An original blend that makes the rich Oriental to- 
baccos richer by pleasing combination with Burley and 
other home-grown tobaccos. A new method of rcliir ;:. 
the satiny imported paper by crimping, instead of /:,.:'.'■::■.-. 
A smart "brown-and-silver" package, with triole wrv- 
ping to keep Spurs fresh. 

Spur offers you tip-top quality at rock-bottom price. 
What do you say? 



Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 





arette^ 




BfflBttlil^^^ii^^^^-^i^V.i^ .,: 



!t-^A£.*t—(^.?:L 



U. 



-"■> 



mT^. 



I '•■' 'i' "; i ! ■ 

-] " ■■!■!! ' 

.TUESDAY, JULY 26, 1930 






EMHMfcfiKksroi 



THE TRIBUNE 



Page 7 



'-.<- 





i*-"*, ■ r 






YOU promised jpour friends 
you would win an automobile 




— ^ 



_4 



NOW 



? . VV«f\ 
I "■ " " 'Br? ' : *tt\ 



Make Good On 





When You Entered 

The Tribune's great $3,600 automobile campaign, you went in to win— with the primary intention of winning the Buick "Six," first 
grand prize in the wonderful prize list offered. You have worked, throughout the campaign, with the intention of winning the BEST* 
PRIZE POSSIBLE— and have adhered closely to your original determination to make that prize the Buick "Six". "Wishing to 
win this car, you have worked MIGHTY HARD for subscriptions. You told your friends what car.you were working for, and 
they, in most cases, admired your pluck and ambition, gave you their subscriptions— to help you win that car. They believe in you — 
f they believs that you will win-^that is the reason that they gave you their help. 

The Winner In 

The Tribune's great co-operative drive for subscriptions will be the worker who turns in the largest amount of business in the next 
two weeks— during the few remaining days of the campaign, before July 3 1 st. This is true because the race is so close right . now 
that it is still anybody's race-~the decision must come during the time remaining. The worker who leads at the end of the campaign 
will earn the equivalent of eighteen hundred dollars. Make you^elf that winner by doing your best work now! 

The Second Period 

has been one during which every contestant did the best work he or she could do — and also a period during which the battle was 
so evenly fought that no one gained any very large lead, or no one fell very far behind. The second period is coming to a close 
with a tie for first place between five or six good workers--and corresponding ties down the line. In other words, it is still anybody's 
race— there is still an opportunity for anyone to win. You have just as much chance now as you ever had— if you will only go to 
work and WORK HARD for subscriptions which you must have to win. It's not a question of who is ahead now— it is a ques- 
tion of who will be ahead on July 3 1st. The positions of the workers may be completely interchanged before the end of the racfe— 
and it's up to you to change them if you want to win! • 

If You Want 

to make gc-od with your friends, you've got to win. If you want to justify the confidence they have shown in you and the expenditure 

ot time and labor which you have made-you ve got to win. And the only way for you to win is by doing.better work durin« the 

} balance of the campaign-better and harder work than ever before. Only a short time remains-only a few days before the° end 

i ot the race-yet in that short time, by redoubling your efforts, by increasing the time and the labor you are putting into the work 

' W^^ffiAfi^^'f^i™^ the r B i Uick - Make n g00d with your friends and yourself-BY 
WORKING— BY WINNING!! Hard Work during the rest of the campaign will win the Buick "Six" for you. 



f 



YOU CAN WIN A BUICK "Six" BY WORKING HARD FOR THE REST OF 

THE TRIBUNE'S JUTOMOBILE CAMPAIGN. YOU CAN WIN A SMALL FORTUNE BY DOING 
YOUR BEST WORK NOW--YOU CANT AFFORD TO LAG—TO DO SO MEANS DEFEAT!! 




Make Good With Your Friends and Readers By Getting 
Every Subscription Possible RIGHT NOW! 



Days Count 



/■■ !• 



» A^.^: d^Mtds^^M^M^m^i&i. ^i^Mk^Mi 




ic jMuiuaui«c33'«i=* 



\ 



Page Eight 




Misses Vaiborg Sandum and La- 
vena 'Nelson returned to this city 
Friday, after spending a few days 
visiting: with friends in St. Hilaire. 

Joe Feely and sisters, of St. Paul, 
motored thru this city on their way 
to Roseau Vast Friday. 

Elmer Oompton and sister, Geneva, 
motored over from Grceubush last 
Friday and spent; the day in this city 
shopping and visiting with friends. 

Miss Ei'vera Carlson, who has been 
employed ar. I-dken's Department 
store, left Friday afternoon for St. 
Hilaire where she will visit for about 
a week with friends. 

Mrs. II. Muzzey, who has been 
visiting friends in this city for the* 
past week, left Friday afternoon for 
Red Lake Falis. where she will visit 
for an indefinite period with her 
mothor, Mrs. TV. Zaiser. 

Mr. and Mrs. . Frank Hoppe and 
children left Friday evening for 
Stephen Point, "Wis., where they will 
spend, a week or ten day. s visiting 
with friends and relatives. 

Milde'n Boreen and John Hendry 
left Friday for ; RhineVander, Wis., 
to visit for a while at the home of 
the former's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
TV. A. Boreen. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. P. Anderson and 
children, Mr. and Mrs. Lute York, 
Mrs. H. F. Fisher- and nephews, 
Gerald and Roy Turney, motored to 
Warroad Saturday to spend the week 
end at the Lake of the Woods. 

Miss Olive Holland of Mahnomen 
visited" Friday at the J. J. Yorachek 
home enroute to Fordvifle, N; D., 
where she will visit with friends and 
relatives " for an indefinite period. 

Art O ranger of Cass Lake is spend- 
ing a few days visiting with friends 
-in this city. 

Misses Emma and Ida Swanson 

returned to this city Satdrday after 

spending a few days in Fargo, N. 

D., visiting with friends and relatives 

' and attending the fair. 

Miss Yvonne Poirer of this city is 
spending a few days visiting in 
. Crookston as j the : guest of Miss 
Grace Kinseja. 

Miss Gladys' Olson, of St. Hii'aire, 
returned to her home Friday, after 
spending a few days visiting at the 
home of her aunt, Mrs. J. P. Peder- 
son. \ $ '■ 

Miss Ruby Anderson left . Friday 
for 'Goodridge where she was the 
week-end guest I at the J. P. Jenson 
home. " 

Miss Marie Thill' left Friday for 
Red Lake Falls iwhere she wili' visit 
with friends and relatives for about 
two weeks. ■ i 

"~ Miss Leah Hunt, who completed 
her course of nursing at the Physi- 
cians hospital in May. arrived in this 



om 



et li- 



cit y fr 

Fai*:s to 
the phy.' 
hospital 
"turned t 

Miss 
spent tl 
at the 1 
ci.y 
Forks w 

Mrs. I 
Halstad 
with hei 
there. 

Misses 
who 
of their 
past w 
St. Hila 

Misse; 
FeYlnian 
shoppers 

Mrs. 
been vis 
home in 
home in 

Miss 
Fargo 
as the 



her home in Red Lake 
attend the picnic given by 
icians for the nurses of the 
staff on Friday. She re- 

lier home Saturday. 
Magdalen Hance, who has 
past two weeks visiting 
ome of her parents in this 

■ned Saturday to Grand 
lere she is employed. 

Yistaunet ieft Saturday for 
to visit over the week-end 

husband, who is practising" 



have. 



e<k 



son.- 

Misse 
iams Vef 
where tl 
visiting 
Dolau. 



[^^S^^ff!?^^^^ 



^^^^^WS^^^W^WW^^^^^^ 



YHE TRIBUNE 



TUESDAY, JULY 20, 1920 



Alice and Hazel Fricker,. 

been visiting at the home 

aunt, Mrs. Adolphs, for the 

returned to their home in 

re Saturday. 

Olive Patterson and Mildred 
vere among the out of town 
in the city Friday. 

H. Thompson, who has 

ting at the C. G. Mattison 

this city, returned to her 

Crookston Saturday. 

:311a Gran left Saturday for 

w: iere she will spend one week 

lest of Miss Bernice Ander- 



W. 



Myrte and Margaret Wiil- 

Saturday for Grand Forks 

ey will spend a short time 

it the home of Mrs. E. C. 

SVhile in the city they win 

also atte id the fair. 

Mr. a id Mrs. Arthur Lawrence, 
who hay ; been visiting for the past 
ten dayj with 'their nephew, L. H. 
Lawrenc > of this city, drove to Red 
Lake Fails Monday. At that point 
they boa rded the train for their home 
in Dolau S. D. 

Miss Ade!ia Malaud, of St. Hilaire, 
spent M mday in this city shopping 
and visiting with friends. 

Mr. 'and Mrs. H. O. Loken and 
chiVdren left Sunday via auto for 
Minneapolis. From there Mr. Loken 
will *go to Chicago on a buying (rip 
but Mrs.lLoken and the. children will 
remain and" visit with friends and 
relatives] ■ They expect to be gone 
about one month. 

The following families enjoyed a 
delightful picnic supper together at 
Mapi'e Lake Sunday: Keenes, Clarks, 
Odins, Robinsons, Stoughtons. Klines, 
Man then . Bergstroms, " Cronstroms, 
Wassgreis and Bardens. 

Messr.-. Dennis McGinn. Jordan 
Penney, Ray Kiland, Allan Fossum 
and Keimeth Wattam motored to 
Mapi'e Lake Saturday to spend- the 
week-end. They returne/1 Sunday, 

Mrs. Lena Halstrom, of this city 
accompanied* by her. son, Clarence, 
left Moi day morning for Warroad 
where tl:ey will "visit one week with 
relatives 

Mrs. G Swenson, who has been in 



DANC 

—at- 



MA VIE! 

Saturday, July 24 

TICKETS $1.0( 
LUNCH INCLUDED WITT TICKETS 

Two-Piece Orchestra 



Eergus Falls, visiting her father, 
spent Sunday i\*ith -friends and rel- 
atives in this city'. She returned to 
her home in Holt Monday morning. 

Amy Krohn. Ted McGinn and Orrin 
Ostby motored to Maple lake Satur- 
day afternoon. They returned to this 
city Sunday. 

Miss Mildred Hnrafdsou, who has 
been visiting for the past six weeks 
at the home of her^grandparents, Mr. 
and Mrs. John Aos." returned to her 
home in Middle River Monday. 

Miss Rose. Elliugson returned to 
"Warren where she had been receiv- 
ing medical treatment. 

Mrs. A. Sands and three, children 
of Annandale arrived in this Satur- 
day evening, where she will spend 
a few days visiting with friends. 
From here she. will go to St.. Hilaire 
where she will visit for an indefinite 
period at the liome of her . parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. A. Swenson. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Ganville, ar- 
rived in this city from Dui'uth to visit 
for about a week at the J. C. Berg 
home. ■ Mrs. Glanville was formerly 
Miss Florence Berg. 

Miss. Ruth Torkelson, of Hazel, 
spent the week-end visiting, with 
Miss Shirley Anderson. 

Miss Lucy Xason returned to her 
home in this city, after spending a 
few weeks at the lake in Lengby. 

Miss Elodie Paulson returned to 
this city Saturday evening from 
Warren where she has been receiv- 
ing medical treatment. . 

Nora and Carl Lindquist were 
among the out of town shoppers in 
this city on Saturday. 

Miss Violet Krohn, of Viking, spent 
the week end visiting with friends 
and relatives in this city. 

Rev. Geo. Parish, formerly of this 
city, but now pastor of the Me. E. 
church of Kellog, Idaho, arrived in 
this city Saturday where he spent the 
day renewing oi'd acnuaintences. He 
preached to a large audience at the 
M. E. church Sunday evening and 
left Monday morning for Glenwood. 

Mrs. C. Bartlett and children left 
for Rhinelander. Wis., Saturday 
evening, where they will visit for 
about a week with, relatives and 
friend 

Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Randall re- 
turned to their home in Pennsylvania. 



after spending a few"days a s guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Randall. 

Miss Inez Johnson left Saturday 
evening to enjoy a. two week's vaca- 
tion. While gone she wi'.i visit in 
Chicago, 111., Madison, Wis., arid 
Minneapolis. 

Mrs. M. F. Olson returned to her 
home in Dulutli after spending a 
.week in this city visiting at the A. 
C. Holden home. 

C. L. Hansen left Saturday eve- 
ning for Detroit, Mich.,to attend & 
convention which is meeting in an 
attempt to establish a waterway be 
tweee New York City and Duluth. 
Mr. Hansen is one of the five rep 
recitatives from this state. 

Miss Laura Stoppel left for her 
home in Alexandria Saturday, where 
she will visit for a week with friends 
and relatives 

Clyde Nason and Norberf Holz- 
knecht spent the week-enl at the 
Nason cottag at Lengby. 

Miss Bernadette Deary returned 
to her home at Plummer Saturday, 
after spending a few days visiting 
'at the Vellaud home in this city. 

Mrs. Nyberg returned to her home 
in Minneapolis Suuday, after spend- 
ing a few days in this city as the 
guest of Mrs. E. S. Christie. 

Lieutenant Wallace of Minneapolis, 
visited- over Sunday with Sergeant 
Vance B. Hunter. 

Miss Olga Soi'tland. who has been 
visiting for the past six week s nt 
the home of her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. A. Sont'.and, returned to Stf. 
Paul Sunday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Klungiiess ainl 
daughters. Margaret and Clara, and 
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Fuller and 
family motored to Staple Lake Sat- 
urday to spend the week end. 



Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Melgaard and 
family, of Warren, and Mr. and Mrs. 
O. L. Melgaard and family , of Ar- 
gyle, motored over to this city to 
spend Sunday at the T. L. Melgaard 
home. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Johnson re- 
turned to this city Wednesday morn- 
ing from Barrow, Wis., where they 



were called ' by the death of Mr. 
Johuson's mother. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Koji'nnd 
Suuday morning, a baby girl; 

John Ekibicki of Rhoda. was a 
business visitor in this city Sat ur Jay. 

Mrs. Martin Jep.-on, of Rlioda, 
spent Saturday iu this city shopping 
and consulting physicians. 



SOCIETY 

The doctors and their wives 01 
this city plea.-antly entertained on 
Friday afternoon for the nurses of 
the hospital' staff. Captain Draper's 
barge with the picnicers left the pier 
at four o'clock • and went up river 
about five miles before landing. A. 
delicious picnic supper was enjoyed 
at this' point and "they returned ao 
about eight-thirty. An exceedingly 
delightful .time- was reported by all j 
having the pleasure of the affair. I 



The Lyceum 

T$day and Wednesday 
ROBERT WARWICK 

in 

"Jack Straw" 

A load of ice, a waiter's tray, and a woman 
— Jack could handle 'em all. 

Matinee Wednesday 2:30 Billy West Comody 
A Paramount-Artcraft Picture 

Thursday and Friday 
HOUDINI 



in 



''Terror Island 



»» 



This is not a serial, but a real honest-to- 
goodness smashing melodrama. 

A Paramount-Artcralt Picture / 



Come to Me 
Impigned (pinched) Nerves Cause Disease 



There May Be Delay 

in Moving Your Telephone 



If you order your te lepliome moved nes!t week 
you may be told to expect a dtiay in getting it done. 



Xearly half a mili'ion othc 
the United States will move 
mon\h; tcb. And flor ai'l of _ 
wire and other materials wii'l be 



A general shortage of mat 
■lack of suflicient transportation 
back factory output and the teleijl! 
get enough supplies. * 



l' Telephone users . iu 
heir telephones this 
tjiem many carloads of 
needed. 



ials, as we'i' as a 
facilities, is holding 
lone companies cau't 



' lit this emergency it will' h» greatly appreciated 
if you :wi!l order the least possible changes in yout 
n't. And when 



teVephhne equipment 



■something done 
as possible. 



please let' us 1 



Northwestern Telephone Exchange Co. 



±-m£Mmi±>UM fer*&i*ffi;&j«asK; 



11 you need to have 
now as, far in advance 




PEOL 




Here is shown a section of the spinal 
column with three nerves emerging from 
between the vertebrae (small bones of 
the spine). It will be noticed that the 
second vertebrae (reading from the top) 
is out of alignment, or, to use a Chiro- 
practic term, subluxated. This causes 
an impingement (pinching) of the; sec- 
ond nerve, and consequently the life 
force which should flow through that 
nerve to some particular organ, is inter- 
rupted. That organ, not receiving its full 
quota of life force, suffers from Dis-ease 
[lack of ease] and will continue to so 
suffer until lithe pinching 'is relieved. 
THIS IS WHERE THE SCIENCE OF 
CHIROPRACTIC COMES I N. The 
Chiropractor is : called and he, with his 
bare hands only, adjusts the subluxated 
vertebra into its normal position so that 
it is in alignment with . the other ver- 
tebrae, the pinching of the nerve is thus 
relieved, the life force flows uninterrup- 
tedly to the organ involved, and Health 
is the result. SIMPLE, isn't it? • 

DO'NT SUFFER ANY LONGER! 
DON'T GIVE LP! 
DON'T WAIT ANY LONGER! 
Try Chiropractic-it will help you. 
CHIROPRACTIC EVENTUALLY-WHY NOT NOW! 

24 Office Adjustments $25 

Examination and Analysis Free 



DR. L. V, JOHNSON 



LISGENED CHIROPRACTOR 

Graduate of the Famous Palmer School 

Evenings by Appointment 
'PHONE 213 



Outside Calls by Appointment 



■ ?, ■*'■■' ^*--'-v > * , '' : '•*&■" j 




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i 




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-4 



VOI . 20 






^ 



MAN 
ATTRACTIONS 
FOR THE FAIR 



AUTO RACES FOR THE LAST DAY 
TO BE BIG HEADLINER . 
FOR THE FAIR 



Just a trifle more than one week 
until the big Pennington County -fair- 
again throws open- its gates to the 
public and three big days of amuse- 
ment and instruction. 

Local exhibitors are cctting in 
readiness for the exhibiting of a large 
number of articles, including ma- 
chinery, automobiles, etc. The audi- 
torium will be the scene of the wo- 
man's art department and . the in- 
dustrial exhibit of the schools. This 
is being done because of the fact 
that the building at the fair grounds 
is not in .proper shape for the hous- 
ing •of these exhibits and it is felt 
that greater and more interesting 
exhibits, will result if the women of 
the county arc assured of the fact 
that their exhibits will be. well taken 
care of and protected against the 
■elements. 

Amusements galore have been se- 
cured, there will be everything in 
the aerial -exhibition nne that has 
ever been given in the past with 
many new thrillers thrown in for good 
measure; 

An especially interesting (retrac- 
tion has been practically secured for 
the last, day ofthe fair by Secretary 
•G. Howard Smith in the form of 
nutoniubh'e races.' The company to 
give these races are. operating und 
the name of the American Motor 
Racing Company and carry live, rac- 
ing cars and four motorcycles in ad- 
lition to an aeroplane. They wil, 
give a series of eight races and one 
flying event in which the aeroplane 
races with one of their fasetst cars. 
There" will aso'be motor cycle races 
of a hair raising! nature and thrillers 
galore will be furnished for lovers of 
the spectacular. 

The cars arc driven by experienced 
racers and men who have made good 
.in the racing 1 field. The company 
comes with high recommendations 
and the fair management feel that 
with this added attraction for the. 
last day as a drawing card they will 
be able to increase the attendance 
remarkably. 

The (ireat Sigfried. the champion 
ski juniper of Sweden and Canada 
win be here for an exhibition, using 
: a greased runway! for his slide This 
is the only act! of :it s kind oti the 
road today, and slioud prove an es- 
pecially strongj drawing card. '"There 
wili' be acrobatic acts and tumbling 
acts galore for the amusement of the 
children and the grownups. The 
Littc Giant Shows, which have been 
secured for ail three days carry a 
complete and interesting line of 
shows and amusements themselves. 
They have everything that is usually 
carried in the line of high class at- 
tractions and they bear the reputa- 
tion of being strictly on the square 
. and sure to p.case- The fair direct- 
ors guarantee there will be nothing 
displeasing in the Way of amuse 
ments on the- grounds and wheer 
complaint is entered, they will close 
the. show for the bn.'ance of the fair. 
Kspeciii attention is called to the 
fact that ah' exhibits should be en- 
tered as early as 'possible in order 
that the same may be properly taken 
care of before the opening day and 
that everything may be in readiness 
when the first day of the. fair opens. 
Sometlijng like- twenty merchants 
have signiiied their: intention of hav- 
ng booths at the Auditorium and 
they are also endeavoring to secure 
.demonstrators from the different foe; 
tories to be on hand with demonstra- 
tes of oue sort and another. 

Everything looks mighty promis- 
ing for the big fair and from all 
sources is heard the prediction that 
this will be the biggest and best of 
years 



^JB^fl»^ 



The *rki 



THIEF RIVER FALLS. MINNESOTA, FRID'Alf, JULY^3 



/prs from all the neighboring see- 
ms of the country were present and 
everyone present enjoyed the enter- 
tiinmnt xceedingly and feel that 
ley erecived full value for their 
money. 

Following the program at the fair 
founds the band played for a dance 
..fj Hie auditorium and a large num- 
ber were present and staved thru till 
tl o finish. 

The i'ocal post of the American 
rion, who were back of the band, 
did not clear anything on the ven- 
ture, just barely coming out even, 
was estimated at the fair grounds 
the time that there must 'have 
been at least two housand people in 
attendance, but when the total re- 
ceipts were counted it was shown 
there was not even one thousand. This 
explained for the reason that a 
mtuy who attended in ears, left 
thfur cars and secured seats in the 
mdstand. and for the time, it look- 
as if there were a large number 
present, in view of the fact that the 
irjindstand was web.' filled and at 
ist two hundred cars were parked 
the grounds. 

It is to be regretted that more 
peiple could not have been present 
and heard the splendid music of this 
organization as they are well worth 
traveling miles to hear. 



on 



F rizes for Singers, 



ST. 



ton 



win 
and in 



PAUL BOOSTERS TO HOLD 
COMMUNITY SINGING 
WHEN THEY ARRIVE 



Vc are advised by Mi\ R. E. Hii- 

seeretary of the Trade Tour 

coiimittee that all arrangements have 

been made for the Trade Tour of St. 

til's wholesale merchants and 

ufaeturers who wil visit our city 

July 31. 

I : is. planned to have, the train pull' 

in < ii schedule time. There will be a 

■ ide from the depot to the main 

lion of the town and while the 

bus ne-ss men themselves are calling 

upo i our business men the band will 

;iv( its concert. There will also be 

don munity singing which will be 

•onduotod by Mr. Hal Goer, ia weil- 

knovn baritone, singer. There will 

be a prize given to the boy and girl 








Official Paper of "Pennington County 



Kvaie is Disqualified i 

. Kl ' v . O. ,r. Kvale. of Benson, i- , 
disqualified as the Republican candi- ' 
date for congress in the Seventh 
-Minnesota district, in a decision tiled 
by District Judge Albert Johnson. 
«ho heard the suit contesting K vale's 
nomination. 

Congressman A. J. Ydlstead of 
"iranite Fads. „.„„ „,. ls lk , reareii „ v 
Iwae in the June 21. primarv. was 

hired in the decision to be the 



"duly nominated candidate of the 

, Republican party." f„ r congress in 

the Seventh district. Kvaie\va< in- 

| dm-sed by the Nonpartisan league 

Action contesting Uev. Kvale's 

nomination was brought by 25 voters i 

in the district wiio charged violation i 

of the state corrupt practices act. | 

Hearing of the suit was concued at' 

Benson fast week. « I 



ONE WEEK LEFT 
OF TRIBUNE'S 
PRIZE CAMPAIGN 



-•IVST WIX OR LOSE HIRING THE 

WEEK TO LOME— CON- • 

TESTA NTS CLOSE 



'»ne week fro: 
a' eight o'clock, 
lati.m promotion , 



Melby's To Lake 
, l>r. <>. F. Molby and family Veti 
| this morning via auto for a vacation 
at Dcin.it. They will be gone in the 
neighborhood of" two weeks and it 
is certain that "Doc" will have some 
mighty interesting fish stories to re- 
late on his return. 



Big Show Coming 



BIRTH OF A NATION. TO BE 
LYCEUM THEATRE ON 
JULY 29 AND 30 



AT 



the best and the loudest 
addition there will be soven- 
aribut'ed to the children. ' 
Any detailed information regarol- 
he trip may be obtained from tho 
■igei t or* the Soo Line, who with 
other railway ofliciais, is cooperating 
linking this trip a- most sucess 
fuj one. 



CROP REPORTS 
FROM ENTIRE 
COUNTY GOOD 



BEST OUTLOOK IN YEARS FOR 

BUMPER CROPS IS THE 

PREDICTION 



I' 



Crop conditions gen. nil in Pen- 
nington county and this section of 
the state, are reported exeilcnt bet- 



In the twelve reels that tell the 
story of the "Birth of a Nation," to 
he exhibited at the Lvceum Theatre 
on July 29th and 20th, every phase of 
the human einrion is shown that is 
possible to portray. Every gradua- 
tion of happiness, of sorrow, of pain. 
j and of ^ joy are shown. Life 
I and death, human relations, hatred 
and friendship are there, too. and in 
the depiction of friendship, one of the 
I prettiest scenes of the entire twelve 
| reels is shown. It is very short, only 
i a ".minute or so does it Hash on the 
j screen. But you do not forget it. It 
| is a cameo which remains in the vi- 

J j sion for weeks afterward. 

I j A symphony orchestra appears with 

M 'ci ND , IR F NG CARL -SON OF-; the "Birth of a Nation," and tltfjnan- 
• ST. tLOlJD TO LOCATE j agemen't assure ali who attend that 

IN THIS CITY | the picture will be well worth the 

price and for those who have, never 
seen this wonderful picture the treat 
of a. lifetime is in store. 



TO ESTABLISH 
NEW WHOLESALE 
HOUSE IN CITY 



in Northern Minnesota i 
end— when The Tribune' 
U00 profit-sharing camp 
to a close. At this time 



l tomorrow night 
the groaie.-! cire'u- 
irive ever conducted 



Hilt's ro 



in 



• great. .$",- 

itgu comes 

prizes ag- 



glegating well over 
will be given av.ay 
contestants, as well 



53.01)0 

to will 



value 

i wake 

coni- 



to those not winning 



mission cheek 
oilier prizes. 

Will you be one of the winners? 

The race i s mighty close and 
mighty hot, right now— it will be 
even ci'oser and more desperate, he- 
for the end. F.vory contestant real- 
izes just how the matter stands ov- 

eiy worker understands that only, 
good work and hard w..rk 
mined work will win for him. 

It will be a linish: des|i 
fought ami hotly' contest.'' 
oily real workers can hope t. 

out of the race with g I von 

and winning \ote reserves. 

yonrsWf one of the winners 
can do so. if you simply wor 
all your inighl during the las 
' f the great prize cam) ai-.-n. 



e! ueter- 
i. 

'poratej'y 
I'd — and 
to come 
to totni's 
. Make 
si Von 
>rk witli 



n't 



| . .Thief River I 
wholesale hous 
days. The Ei 



To Conduct Hearing 
Governor Bumquist will conduct a 
heaijing. Saturday at 10 a. m. to deter- 
mine which of two rival projects for 
the division of Marshall county and 
creafion of a new county will be sub- 
mitted at the November election. 

Oi e petition asks the creation of 
Liberty county, with Holt as the coun- 
ty seat. The petitioners are repre- 
sented by Alvin B. Christofferson, a 
St. Paul attorney. The second peti- 
tion proposes the establishment of 
Park county, with Middle River as 
the county seat. — Minneapolis Trib- 
une. 



in the entire state. The small gtain ; I*. M-. Cari's 
is coming along as well as it could j St. Cloud, and 
be expected to and the outlook for | ."'i'l embark in 
bumper crops are mighty bright and i of candy starti 
encouraging. Light showers at the I first, 



rails is to have a new j 

the next thirty! 

on-O-Kiee'n building I 



The Bitter Sweet 

Four million pounds of 



tlgar ar- 



i . | >"" iiiiL.iT-n |,i,iioii^ oi sugar ar 

tor in fact than at any other point I °" h ' xlain "venue has been leased by ! rived In Chi, -ago during the latter par 

in the entire yield Tl. n ..... „ i -.*..:.. . I' \f. f ',i,-.^...,. o,,,i t....: — ,•...... ,. i ,.e t 1 . . .. .'. 



Plain. 

olliy iloeiiliii: 

alone will the 
If you hare 
the wonderful 
ofthe race j 
JMxyoil have fail. 
' that is ail. 

And you c- 
j how. either of v 
J doesn't matter i 
i vote total, or it' 
1 sion of pr..nii-.w 
| will give yon >u 

| t! :licr hand. 

■ you have t'alle.'i 
, again — if you hi 
j iv. in your tiu'lit 
i to win. 

! Von can male, 
• or a r.-ii 



st work 
: 'ra.-l.ir- 
ricli prize 
earned tl 
liui.-k "Si 



-Up. 



feel 



•e the 
met it 

.'.aided. 

I prize, 

the end 
it. If 
v. in — 

right 



vi- .'ai.e.l. ,- 
ir l he ,iiii.,- 



'lo- 



ir-. -if 
ork .1 



a winner 



, next 



Tl: 
to lit 
new 
is to 
work 



H. BACHMAN'S 
BAND PLEASES 
LARGE CROWD 



EXCELLENT PROGRAM RENDER- 

ED AT FAIR GROUNDS 

WEDNESDAY EVE 



Build New Addition 
Tliijf River Music company is 
ve a new addition built to their 
quarters 25x30 in size. . which 
lie' used as a work room. The 
is now being done by C. W. 
JIcAdnnis and the new addition is to 
be b lilt of brick and made strictly 
mode rn. The present quarters of the 
Musi: company were a trifle cramp- 
a: there was not sufficient room 
their repair department, and 
the proprietor, Geo.. Christo. imme- 
diate y_ got on the job and straight- 
ened out the situation by the addi- 
tion >f a new building. When com- 
pleted this wil,' give the company a 
niodftn huildSiig; in every respeej 
and wiil be a big help to them in 
taking care 0f their repair work and 
picture framins. 



Tho Million Dob'ar band, under 
the. direction of Harold Bachman, 
gave a very interesting concert at the 
fair grounds Wednesday evening to 
a fair sized crowd. ' The program 
consisted of popular and classical 
selections and peppy inarches. The 
entire organization is composed of 
bigh class musicians and their enter r 
tainment proved "to be. exceptionally 
interesting and as good as previous 
reports had led the people to believe.. 



proper time together with, the cooi'j They plan t< handle nothing but 
weather of the past few day s has j candy and the 
helped materially In putting . the ; candy possible 
grain out of danger with every pros- 
pect for its early . maturity and, 
abundance in' yield. 

Harvesting will begin in a few 
days in most all localities and farm- 
ers- the county ovei are gettng ready 
for the harvesting of a big crop. 
The cutting of grain will' be started 
In the next week or ten days and. 
haying is well out of the way.' The 
prospects in all Vines of garden truck 
are exceptionally bright and those, in; 
position to know state this year wil.'! 
eclipse many previous years in the 
yield of bumper crops of all kinds. , 

Everywhere., the conditions i'ook ex. ; 
ceedingly promising and all are op- ; 
tomistie over the outcome of this j 
year's crops. The fields are clean and , 
filled with a mighty fln'e stand of| 
grain and Pennington county this! 
year is certainly going to repay those ; 



* .. .--" '""•"(, i.e- lunci pail . n 

and Irving Carlson of! of June. It was purchased from Cuba j to he. 
l hese two young men by English merchants, sold to Can- j iliuinu- 

the whoe.'sale selling atlian consignes. a".i t-e^a.i ;„ ti.;,. i 

ig about September j country. This i 

i 



very best lines of 
ito secure. They are 
both experienced in this iine of busi- 
ness and at present are conducting 
a candy store atj St. Cloud. They will 
close out their interests in that city 
and will be permanejif residents of 
Thief River Falls in the course of th e 
next few weeksj. . P. M. Carlson will i 
have charge ofj tly office work and 
the city trade and his brother, Irving 
wil! make the 

It is their intention to take in the 
trade .territory is far north as War- 
road, and Baudetfe and the southern 
territory as far 
wilt also work 



and resold in. this 
one of those pleas- 
ant fttle instances growing out of 
Mr. Wilson's refusal to heed tile ap- 
peal of. President Menoeal. of Cuba, 
to option the 'Cuban sugar crop at 
<>',<: cents a pound, and of the Wil- 
son-PaJiner pandering to the Louisi- 
ana sugar barons. Small' wonder 
that sugar is approaching 3.0 cents. 



eertilill 
sure V 



eelc will decide which it 

It you. work harder than , 
the next weeli. y.-u wil! 
to solidify your lord — ro 

.'.If victory An,;, if j 

ally far heliiml y ■ rival 



he 
in- 



ns Mahnomen. They 

the east and west 

.territory and ft el confident, of build- 

ig up a big trade In the candy line. 

The new tirm wiil add to their 

force as the business expands and 



who have placed their faitli 
secton in mighty good shape. 



this 



new lines will 
to time to take 
They announce 
very hghest 



be added from time. 

care of the trade. 

that nothing but the 

rade will be handled 



A Splendid Rain 

A splendid general rain of one inch 
or more last night followed by more 
rain today is bad for hay, but helpful 
to some localities that have been in 



trade, the very 
a right price. 



There will be 



d service from start to finish is to 
be their main object giving the retail 



best to be secured at i 



TO OPEN NEW 
PENNEY STORE 
SEPTEMBER 1ST 



liitnlci- Wui-k lh:i 
ih'XI wi-.-U win uhr 



I'VIT 



ri'si'rvi* t<> pin-i* 

<'wi .-iilrr — Isn' 
win wortli ini'i;- 
sn" far iiiaih'V 

'•haiH'i' olTi'H'tl y 

tin* very hnnli'sr 



vim in tli« 
t Mm- prizi" 
i-rf.-n rha:i 
I-Ii'l tin- -i 
«>ii worth m 
v.nvk viiii i 



'iuriu.^ 



the 
vote 



And are you wiilin" r.> w..i 

work hard, i si.l"i-.iti..ii 

wonderful prize you can win'; 

Nexl week- will win or i. 
you II It . I. -pen. Is on .v.,u and 
work which it shrlf I,,.. 

Wind ii, 
whirl'v-hl 
d"-et-m::::r 

1*11! ill ! 



.; can 
have 

lerful 
than 

1 do? 
and 

f the 



air camp.- 
■fgy a in I 
that uio 



Wi 



MANAGER HINRICHS TO MOVE 
HERE FROM CROOKSTON 
.NEXT WEEK — 



And k" 



111 



unl wi: 



Citizenship For Soldiers 



a hearing on citizen- 



UNGLAIMED LETTERS 

Th i following is a list of the un- 
clalmtd letters held at the Thief 
River Falls, Minn., post office for the 
week ending July 18, 1920. If not 
called for within two weeks from the 
above date they will be sent to the 
Dead. Letter Branch, Chicago, 111. 

Aut tin, Mr. O. A. 

Auttin, Mr. O. A. 

Eri ikson, Mrs. E.- M. 

Jaobson, Mr. Theo. 

Larton.'Mr. Victor 
. Weiber, Mrs. MabeL 

We>ber,# Mabel 

Whsn calling for the above letters 
please state that-' they we're adver- 
tised. 

John Morgan, P. M. 



A 
piano 



E. Mcliifyfe, the we'll known 
J tuner, w|i' be in Thief River 

Fails in the neat, future. Those wish. 

ing tl eir pianos tuned leave, orders 

with Larson Furniture company. 

Country and near-by village orders 
prompt atteutiqjj and work 



guarai teed. 



'» oome localities tnai nave been in mere win De a neanng on cittzen- 
need of rain badly, and splendid fori ship and naturalization papers at the 
flax everywhere. We really have the Court House on| Friday, the 30th day 
best ernn of «.v y, arc . ,.,„ u — i..j f j u i y> 1920, at; 10 a. m. Any honor- 
ably discharged, soldier who is not a 
citizen of the United States and who 
wishes to become such can be admit- 
ted to citizenship immediately if he 
appears at the hearing. He must have 
his discharge papers and two witnes- 
ses who can identify him and who are 
citizens of the United States. He does 
not have to prove length of residence 
or jurisdiction of court and no fee is 
charged. For further information see 
the Clerk of Court at the Court House- 



best crop of flax here we have had 
for many years. It looks fine, has 
looked fine all the time, and this ram 
iust gives it the right jump. We 
have much to be thankful for this 
fear in our crop result. 

Sugar "Melon" to Stock 

The South Porto Rico Sugar com- 
pany has declared a stock dividend 
of 100 per cent, payable August 6 
to common stockholders of record 
■Tuly 24. It is announced thte new 
stock will carry dividends for the 
current quarter beginning July 1. 
Application win be made for the list- 
ing of this stock on the New Yotk 
stock exchange. — Minneapolis Tri- 
bune. 



add-3t 



First Evangelical Lutheran Church 

Albin A. Larson, Pastor 
Services in the Swedish language 
at 10.30. Bible class and Sunday 
school at 11:45. Services in the 
Amriean language at 7:45. 



■Orygla Here Sunda 

A return game i< i., I... p( : 
t yu-la ill tliU p ace next Su 
j an opportunity will !,<• u r i 
Ij. W. Ilinriehs, manager of the ' ,! rygla team to u'.-i rev.ie: 

•I. ('. Penney store at (.'rookston and ; Thief River team f 

who i,. to be in charge of the store ; thoy re.ieive.l last s 

at. this place, was in the city Thurs- j They have a mini! 

lay and made arrangements for 

moving .his family to this city. He 

expects to be -moved and located in 

his new 'home next week and will 

start active work on the arrange- 



tre: 



■e.| with 

lay and 

'•ii ihe 

on the 

llieul 



it Hi--. 



la 



LOST— 27 HEAD OF EWES, ONE 
buck and 20 laubs. Lambs all have 
long tails and weigh from 75 to 
100 pounds. Ewes all have black 
face. Notify W. 6 Hamrick, An- 
gus, Minn. 3(j.tf 



W. H. Larson, of Grand Forks, 
was in this city Tuesday attending 
to business matters. 

Mrs. C. T. Cljristianson and daugh- 
ters Thelma and Gladys left Thurs- 
day for Minneapolis and Nevada, 
Iowa, where they will visit for about' 
three weeks. | 

Mrs. S. C. Coumbe was called to 
Vergas last evening on acount' of the 
serious illnes of her father. 



nue North. 



FOR SALE— feOOD TEAM AND 
harness. Reisonable price. Cad 
Mrs. .1. J. Aijible, 933 Horace ave- 



FOR RENT 



room. Telephone 515. 39-2pd 



!..«££■£ 



sijaW 



-OJrE FURNISHED 



input' of the new store. 

The store is to be located in the 
Meehun block, corner Second and 
Main, and the interior of the build- 
ing is to be remodeled .completely for 
the new firm. They wiil install the 
latest in fixures and modern conven- 
iences and will carry a complete 
line of everything that is useil in the 
home. 

Mr. Hinrichs stated that it perhaps 
would be" the first , of September be- 
fore the new store would be open in 
view of the fact tuat there i 3 much 
to be done in the way of remodeling 
the building and securing the proper 
help and attending to all details 
which arise in the opening of a 
large establishment. He is confident 
that they wiJl find this city a desir- 
able location an is mightily pleased 
with tho outlook. ■ 

The J. C. Penney company is con- 
sidered one of the big and leading 
merchandise institutions of the coun- 
try and they have been a big success 
in every locality in which tbev 
have located. Thief River Fall's 
will without question prove a mighty 
fine field of operation for the new 
concern, and with her unlimited 
trade territory wili' give the new eon. 
cern a much larger field thant the 
ordinary city can offer. 



it-.oil men 
and always put up an Interesting 
game. They will Cine loaded for. Ihe 
•game Sunday an. I tiie boosters ,n 
that locality claim the game to he 
played next. Sunday will not prove 
to be such a walk-a-wu.v for the 
loeais. Much interest in .Sun. lay's 
game is manifested and ■ a good 
crowd no doubt will he on hand lo 
see the battle royal. 



Farm Wages High 

What farmers are willing t,, pay 
for labor in Minnesota i. s being 
found out by F L. French. siH-retary 
of the Minnesota Farm Bureau Fed- 
eration. Thru the . comity agents 
Mr. French is gathering statements 
from farmers as to what they re- 
gard as fair wages. 

Reports from 32 counties widely 

distributed have b l received. These 

show that fo r general work by ihe 
day farmers fix the wage on an av- 
erage of $3. 15: for work by the 
month for S months. Sux.si;: for 
work at haying by the day. S3. SO: 
shocking, S4.30: threshing. S 1.3.1; 
fail work. S3. 35: corn picking, per 
bushel, S cents: winter work per 
nionth: .544. To these wages room 
and board should be added. 

Labor is going to he tempted to 
leave the city for the farm, thinks 
-Mr. French, inasmuch as -iich wages 
with room and hoard added- give the 
laborer more than he can earn, ae- 
coritig to the present scale in the 
cities. 




51 j 



m 



-JL_ 



•—if* 



Page Two 



......Automobile 



' ■ ' H-l ' l'. 1 .,- 



\"HE TRIBUNE 



Campaign News..... 



MAYIMS FROJV, 



?»«gftcs°«o^^ g fstax5g fz^-BggFggr^ 



j 



FRIDAY, JULY 23, 1920 



ROTHSCHILD 



The elder Rothschild, the greatest 

:• that Europe 

fo'do.wins max- 



bankor and nnam 1 

ever knew, had t 

iiu-s posted in conspicuous places on 

the walls of hi s many banks 



"LABOR WiyS ALL. "-Tacitus 



This column conducted by Auto- 
mobile Campaign Department, The 
Tribune. 



A LITTLE ADVICE 



out plainly and cash- or check bal- 
anced" accurately, so that there will 
be no uuntaossary dei'ay or no op- 
portunity tor inaccuracy on the part 
of those handling the final orders. 
The bailoring will be open — contest- 
ants wii'l be permittcl to be present 
while judites tabulate and total re- 



"Dare to go for 
"Never be di: 
"Never tell bu 
"Be polite to 



vard. 
1 >uraged. 
iness lies, 
veryone. 



You cannot make a success- 
ful clinlb unless you believe ill 
yourself. The key to success 
is embodied in the power that •' 
is in you — in your self-conu- 
dence and self-reliance and self- 
help. — Kaufman. 

Act — think — work. Don't 
believe tlw— Access can ever 
conic to a half-hearted worker. 
— Shaw. 

The successful salesman, of 
newspapers or pictures, of au- 
tomobiles or cards, must not 
only believe in the value of his 
goods, but HE MUST ALSO 
BELIEVE THAT IT IS, HIS 
MISSION AS A SALESMAN 
TO MAKE OTHERS APPRE- 
CIATE .THIS VALUE.— iVood- 
worth. 

.Jfever show discouragement. 
The quitter is instinctively dis- 
liked by every man— and you 
can't secure audience or inter- 
est or assistance where your 
subject is out of sympathy 
with you. — ,T. H. Appel, 

Having determined to rise to 
a certain goal — achieve it at 
ail costs. — Arnold Bennett. 

The first and most impor- 
tant element of success is the 
determination, to succeed. — 
Anon. 

One today is worth two to- 
morrows. — Poor Richard's Al- 
manack. 

Say to yourslf : "My place is 
at the top"— and then go out 
and work until you get there. 
— Martin. 

A competent worker can't 
be kept down — nor an incompe- 
tent one kept up. — Hail. 

Take advantage of every cfr- 
cumsame that will help yon 
achieve your resolutions. If 
■ have set out 'to do a certain 
thing, sec that you turn every 
minute eircAtuistnnce, every 
slight impetus, to your advant- 
age — that you do. in short, 
your work so well as to win 
without iloubr. — M. .Field. 

Men tire inexcusable if they 
do not pursue that which their 
judgment tells them is laud- 
able ani' worthy ; of effect. — 
Joseph Addison. 



turns atid 
orders car 
by contest 
confidence 
be any 



campaign 
! there will 
\ to any woi 
1 standing of others. 



iix the vote totals. Last 
be deposited in the office 
mts and left, with perfect 
that at no time will there 
orinatiou given to any 
other worker. The management of 
The Tribu le and of the automobile 
lepartnient guarantee that 
be no information given, 
ker, as to the comparative 



"Be prompt in everythin 



\ "Employ your 

. we'd.. 

1 "Bear all trouble patiently. 

"Maintain you • 
! sacred thing. 



newspaper published in Northern jhard to sell to — don't let him get 

Minnesota: I away from you. YOL* DON'T KNOW 

Again, suppose that he te'.ls you to] TILL YOU'VE TRIED— til. you've 

"come back later." Do you walk I tried more than once. 



It is 



time sensibly and 



integrity as 



Orders 
time up 



nay be MAILED at any 
(jo eight o'clock, Saturday 



lit, July 31st. It must be care- 
ful.'y notei . however, that all MAIL- 
ED orders must hear a LEGIBLE 
l'OSTMAl K as having been mailed 
at the contestant's post-office BE- 
F0RE EipHT O'CLOCK, SATUR- 
DAY NIGHT. JULY 31st. Such 
MAILED fullers wi!i be turned over 
to the jm ges immediately they are 
received— iuid will be counted at 
once. 

It is r< quested that, wherever 
possible, cjntestauts give either per- 
sonal- or certified cheek for the a 
mount of their order. That is it 
would be advisable for workers to 
deposit Hi > money they take in for 
subscripts ns to their own account, 
and then draw a check for this 
amount. This saves mistakes or 
losses in I audiing checks. 

GET Y(|)UR ORDER IN EARLY!! 
KEEP THEM COMING ALL THE 
TIME!! MAKE THEM BIG ORDERS 
—AND WIN!! 



The Spanish have 
it go til! tomorrow.' 
: Spain is degeneiating 
' It's the worker 
i work TODAY, w 
i "One today is woi 



I 



KEEP 

What do you 



saying : "Let 

That's why 

every year. 

ho always does his 

iio wins in the end. 

rth two tomorrows." 



you do — NOW IS YOUR TIME?! 

You can't fosc — absolutely. But 
get over the idea or the belief that 
YOU'RE BOUND TO WIN A BIG 
PRIZE — you're NOT!! Only your 
own effort will win for you— and 
you can't be sure until the decision 
of, the judges is announced whether 
or not you have doneso! 

GET OVER YOUR SELF-COM- 
PLAISANCE— FORGET YOUR BE- 
LIEF THAT YOU ARE IN THE 
LEAD. The decision is still to come ! 
Whether it shall be favorable or not' 
rests with you— with your hard work ■ 
for the. next nine days — with your 
conscien'ous effort, 

WHICH SHALL IT BE? 

The next nine days will tell!!! 
Wind up your campaign in a blaze: lie refuses to consider your offer? 
of glory, a sudden wave of energy i Do you give up and walk away — do j 
and determination, a struggle for j you cease trying to laud the sale, j 
votes which wttV leave your rivals land mark the prospective sub,esriber| 
gasping. The last week will win! off. as impossible to sell? Or do you j 
for you!! Get the subscriptions , keep on fighting — go over your prop- 1 
first of the : osition again aiid repeat your offer! 
subscriptions 1 ' in another way?! In your acceptance j 
renew j f rebuffs — in your mnner of working, 1 
again later. Remember that on see- j after the first .refusal, lies the de- 
ond payment subscriptions you re-' cLsion for success or failure in your 
ceive the difference between the j campaign for subscriptions, 
amount given on your first order and j Suppose your| prospect says "The 



FIGHTING 

do, when, after giv- 



your proposition to a customer, 



you 
away angry and disgruntleii. dctei- \ 
mined not to go baek and "get any ! 
more "turn-downs V" Or do you go; 
back again and ngain. until you DO ! 
get his subscription? One way cf 
handling such an ansv>-er makes for 
>m-(_-e-s — another for fnilure. 

In short— no matter what the re- 
buff or the refusal given you — have 
an answer or a way of meeting it. 
If you can't meet the prospect's ar- 
gument at the time — let it go and 
rhtm go back Ivxqy, when you've the 
facts 10 handle his objections. AND 
KEEP RICHT OX GOING BACK 
AGAIN AND AGAIN— KEE1' RIGHT 
ON TRYING TIME AFTER TI.ME. 
Eventually — you'll get it!'. 
And.' above ah else^ — remember 
that NOW i? the time for you to do 
your best work! The campaign 
closes next week-rafter next Satur- 
day night. Jui'y 31st. there'll not be 
a chance in the world for you to get 
anywhere in. the race. NOW IS THE 
TIME — NOW IS YOUR ONIA'j hour 

loiTi 



t altngi ther ;t nytriiv cf luck, 
when some man or woman jrers far 
ahead in the iranie of life For hick 
is usualiy with the man who jumps 
the hardest, when crossing a ditch. 
And iuek is always with the one who 
works hardest. ARE YOl'«A WORK- 
ER? 

Give every man a square deal. 
Be honest, firm and conseient- 
ous; eager to serve and ready to 
work, i'ur into your life's work the 
best that is in you. of effort ami 
ability. Be honest with every man — 
and especially with yourseif. If you 
start to do a tiling 1 — y«nir star; in? 
is equivalent to a promise ;■• do that 
very chcag. , X>0 IT : ! 

There's no one can boat you but 
yourself. There isn't anyone who 
ran beat you. if you believe in 
yourself. Cultivate self-con tidonoe 
and self-reliance — and win! 



It 



CHANCE TO WIN!! 

Go ahead and work hard and de- 
terminedly — AND WIN!! 



Air. B. Busy Says 



promised you at the 
campaign — get the 
from those who promised to 



■•»>., 



Next Sanr.day night at eight 
o'clock the great. $3,000 automobile 
campaign comes to a close. After 
that time, as soon as the judges have 
completed the careful count which is 
to be made — subscriptions will do 
nothing to help you — you will find 
it impossible to' get ; ahead— you will' 
be THItOI.'tlll. ' •' : - 

And whether .you. shall be. at that 
time, a glorious winner or a broken, 
failure — depends entirely upon you. 
A POSSIBILITY OF YIG 



ON BEING A LEADER 

"When you work, work. Put your ' 
whole mil d ;.nd heart iiito it. Know . 
nothing e se. Do everything the 
best you :an. Distance everybody 
about you, This "'ill not be hard — \ 
for ten to one the other fellows aren't, 
trying in ich — and if they are. all 
you need to do to beat them is to 
do even better work. Master details 
and diflici Ities.' Be always ready for 
the next *tep up. No matter what 
you are, uake yourself an expert at 
it — i n."f5m ich as is possible. All -this 
is easy when the habit of conquer- 
ing, the t etermination to win, the 
self-con fit ence in victory, take po- 
session of your mind. 

"Be yolirseif the leader— not the 
trailer. Set the standard — do not 
follow itj Then you will mold in 
stead of being molded — will win in 
stead. of watching someone e'.se' wiu. 



the total amount for the total term , 
subscribed for. For instance, if you ! 
took a subscription for one year dur- 
ing the first perid, upon which you 
were given ten thousand votes, and 
now receive an added two years, or 
a total subscription length of THREE 
YEARS, you will be given the dif- 
ference between 10,000 vote s and 
25,000 votes— or FIFTEEN THOUS- 
AND VOTES. 

GET EVERY SUBSCRIPTION 
POSSIBLE! GET EVERY ORDER 
POSSIBLE! GET ALL THE VOTES 
POSSIBLE!! 

AND DO SO AT ONCE ! ! 



price is too high" — what do you tell 
him? It is a fact that some workers 
give up. when! this refusal is met, 
without trying j further. Try it this 
way, just once: Remind him that 
the price of paper has gone up two 
hundred per cent; that printer's ink 
and labor cost I from fifty to one 
hundred per cent more than they did 
in 1018. And| apply the same rule 
that has forced' increase in the price 
of newspapers ;to his own 'farm and 
the. prices he received and pays. Go 
further — show him that he gets The 
Tribune TWICE A WEEK for the 
same price as ■ any other WEEKLY 




takes a horse and buggy three 
i to go eighteen miles after a 
t It take< a g^od car less than 
half an hour. Some day you're go- 
ing to want that car — and need it 
badly. 

The Tribune, wit! give you . the 
finest and the sturdiest and the most 
j dependable six-cylinder automobile on 
the market, or the lightest and most 
efficient tight four-cylinder, car 
made — FUKE OF CHARGE. 

And work during next week will 
win it for you. 

MAKE VOL'R WORK WIN"— IT'S 
MORE THAN WORTH THE EF- 
FORT!! 



Continued on Page 3 



•2«S* 



There's only one way to find out ! 
whether or not a thing can be done] 
— and that is to try it. Simply be- ; 
cause a certain prospect LOOKS ' 



THEO QUALE 

Lawyer 

ractiee in all Courts; and Bo 

fore U. S. Land Office 

McGinn Building 

'Thief River Falls, Minn. 



SICK PEOPLE 

Come to Me 
Impigned (pinched) Nerves Cause Disease 



— Archer 



;atisfy 
every 



Brown. 



KEEP GOING 

Don't set discouraged, and begin 
to slow lp just because you've not 
made en >ugh subscription sales to 
>u. Remember — every one 
line of business, has "off 
days," when it's impossible to make 
a sale. And remember that it's only 
the feflolv who keeps going IN 
SriTE OF EVERY OBSTACLE AND 
IN SPIT-JE OF ALL DIFFICULTIES 

•:ver WINS. 



THERE IS 

TORY— TIIF.UIO IS A POSSIBILITY j —THAT 

OF DEFEAT. And the decision • for Make vmirself a winner — by start. 

failure or victory will' come during j ing your 

the week to come — -duing the last | 

week of "the geatest prize campaign; 

.. _ n.„ -\r:.,., rt _ 



Just i: 



I great $8 



ladui'icd 1 in northern ''Minne- 
sota." It's up to you to make every! 
minute count — to make, every day be- j 
tween now and Saturday night. July I chances 
31. lit eight o'clock, count' to the ut- 
most in votes and subscriptions. 

TIIF.UE'SSTli.L TIME TO WIN— 
THERE'S STILL TIM10 TO LOSE. 
"What if you have fallen behind — for 
some reason which/ you could not 
avoid': THE RACE MAY BE WON 
: NEXT WEEK!! And 
on the other haiid, remember that 
tlje fact that you have im unusually 



hardest work at once!! 



JUST NINE MORE. DAYS! 

days — and 



ine more days — and your 

of entering The Tribune's 

000 automobile campaign or 

of winning one of the wonderful 

prize.* o fered — are over Just nine 

days — and the greatest prize 

conducted in northern Min- 



I more 
' race eve 



WILLI 



nesota^) tines to a close. 



YOU BE A WINNER? 



It res s with you. There's nothing 



any one 



good vote reserve, does not mean | 
that you are safely in the lead — does 
not indicate, that you are safe in 
slowing up your work or in ceasing 
to keep going all the time. YOU 
CAN'T FEEL SAFE IN VICTORY — 
OR DISAPPOINTED IN DEFEAT — 
YET. In' justice to yourself — in- 
crease your . efforts— work harder — 
work longer and witli even more 
effort than at any previous time — 
during this, the last week of the 
great' prize campaign. 

By doing so. you can insure victory 
— bv failing to do so you will lose. 
ISN'T THE PRIZE YOU CAN WIN 
MORE THAN WORTH THE EF- 
FORT YOU NEED TO MAKE? 

GO AHEAD AND WORK AND 
WIN!! 



RULES EOR CLOSE 
OF RACE 

The second and;ast period of The 
Tribune's great $3,600 automobile 
campaign will close promptly at eight 
o'clock Saturday evening, July 31st. 

Subscriptions may be brought into 
the automobile campaign offloes at 
any time up to eight o'cock, either by 
contestants or j their authorized 
agents. It is urged that an "especial! 



else can do for you, now — 
it's got to be YOUR OWN work and 
YOUR OWN effort and YOUR OWN 
application from now to the end. 
YOU must wiu or lose alone — fhere 
is nothing else to say. 
YOU KNOW THAT WORK WILL 
WIN. You know that the better the 
work trie more certain the victory. 
And you want to win — the Buick 
"Six" or the Overland 'Four" or one' 
of the other wonderful prizes. YOU 
WANT [TO WIN!! And there's only 
one way to win and that is by 
WORKING HARDER THAN EVER 
FOR THE' REST OF THE CAM- 
PAIGN-j-by winding up your drive for 
votes vJith a whirlwind energy and 
a despekte- struggle that will make 
your opponents fall- behind You've' 
got to do not only AS GOOD WORK 
AS YOUR RIVALS — but BETTER 
WORK] THAN ANY OF THEJI— if 
you wish to win. 

Understand — there's no time now 
for hesitation — no leisure for consid 




L COMPARE 


" -ll 


SPACE 
i WITH 


ft 


*' THIS 


* 


/ONE 



erations 



to thin c over theifmatter. YOU'VE 



MAKE ! THE DECISION 
WITHOUT A MOMENT'S DELAY— 
you've ;ot to winiight now — or lose. 
IT OVER!! Do you WANT 
badly enough to put in the 
work you know is necessary? 
WANT to come out in the 
lead baidly enugb. to be willing • to 
wind u i your race with harder work] 



GOT T9 



THINK 
to win 
kind of 
Do you 



effort bo made tb have orders made than any you have done yet? If 



-no spare moments for you 



DR. L. 



LIS 



CENSED CHIROPRACTOR 

Graduate of the Famous Palmer School ' 



OFFICE HOURS: 10 to 1 2 and 2 to 5 



Here is shown a section of the spinal 
column with three nerves emerging from 
between the vertebrae (small bones of 
the spine). It will be noticed that' the 
second vertebrae (reading from the top) 
is out of alignment, or, to; use a Chiro- 
practic term, subluxated. This causes 
an impingement (pinching) of the sec- 
ond nerve, and consequently the life 
force which should flow through that 
nerve to some particular organ, is inter- 
rupted. That organ, not receiving its full 
quota of life force, suffers from Dis-ease 
[lack of ease] and will continue to so 
suffer until the ' pinching is relieved. 
THIS IS WHERE THE .SCIENCE bF 
CHIROPRACTIC COMES I N. The 
Chiropractor is called and he, with his 
bare hands only, adjusts the subluxated 
vertebra into its normal position so that 
it is in alignment with the other ver- . 
tebrae, the pinching of the nerve is thus 
relieved, the life force flows uninterrup- 
tedly to the organ involved, and Health 
is the result! SIMPLE, isn't it? 

DO'NT SUFFER ANY LONGER! ' 
'DON'T GIVE UP! ! 

DON'T WAIT ANY LONGER! 
Try Chiropractic-it will help you. 
CHIROPRACTIC EVENTUALLY-WBY NOT NOW! 

24 Office Adjustments $25 

Examination and Analysis Free 



V. JOHNSON 



Evenings by Appointment 
•PHONE 213 



Outside Calls by Appointment 




-L 




FRIDAY, JULY 33, 1930 



Automobile Campaign 

. News 

Continued from Page 2.. 



#• 



WHERE THERE'S A 
WILL 

(Note: This true story of a 
young man's great success, un- 
aided by riches or influence, in 
a campaign exactly -similar Jo 
that now being conducted by 
The Tribune, and written" by. 
that young: man several years 
ago, will appear in installments 
in this column during the pro- 
gress" of The Tribune's great 
$3,G00 campaign. READ IT — 
D O N' T MISS IT — IT HAS 
MUCH IN IT FOR YOU.) 
(By Robert Douglas) 




THE TRIBUNE 



(Chapter Fifteen — Concusion) 

To be honest, there were day s dur- 
ing the last week of the campaign 
when I was nervous — mighty 'her- 
vous. There were so many workers 
—so many hard-working contestants 
— and, somehow, I had rather al- 
lowed some of my Weil-meaning 
friends to encourage me to believe 
that the race wan unfair. There was 
a time when I didn't believe, that I 
would be permitted to win — when I 
felt quite sine that all the other 
workers were trying to beat me by 
fair meaus or foul. 

I told the Colonel' so — expecting 
sympathy. Needless to say, I didn't 
get it. .The Colonei hates a quitter 
worse than anything else in life — 
and you can hardiy blame him. 
Quitting, just because the light was 
a itt!e hard' and the end a little 
doubtful, would have showed me to 
have.no stamina or courage — would 
have proved me absolutely worth- 
less. And he told me so. It: angered 
me for a while, but it did me good. 
Determined to SHOW him that I 
was NOT a quitter, I went into the 
work harder than ever. 

1 went, to every one' of those who 
bad promised me subscriptions "later" 
— "when I needed them" — 'when 
they had the money," etc — and got a 
mighty good share of them. I simply 
told them that I was doubt fur of 
the results — but that I was certain 
of victory if they and the rest of my 
friends heiped me°with their sub- 
scriptions. I went back again and 
again to sonic of them — I called on 
one mail three times in one. day, 
until' finally I got his order— ami I've 
wondered ever since if the main 
reason that 1 got: it wasn't because 
he. was so anxious to gel rid ' of me 
that, he couidn't help but subscribe. 

1 wenl lo friends wl 1 had 

missed before, or who had been.; 
away, and told Iheni jusl how mat-! 
tors stood. I didn't attempt to con- j 
ceiii the stale of matters at all — 1| 
told Ihem that winning the race 
meant a whole int. to me — that I 
simply COULDN'T APr'OM) NOT TO 
WIN. And I told them ai'so that The 
World was a mighty line paper — that 
it was their logical' paper. It sur- 
prised even me, optoniistic as I had 
become, to find bow readily they 
subscribed. 

finally, even the Colonel and moth. 
. e.r caught the fever. In bis big car, 
with a hard look in his eye s -and a 
receipt book in his hand, the ColoneV 
scoured (he country. Did a farmer 
— have flic impertinence to refuse to 
Subscribe. — "impertinence" from the 
Colonel's standpoint — lie mcrei'y told 
him that he. intended to come back 
until he got the subscription. Then, 
he woui'd go on and work a couple 
of other houses, and come back to 
the first one. Very few of them es- 
caped him. ; 

..Mother confined her work prin- 
cipally to the. ladies of the " town, 
church and club ladies whom, she 
knew. She worked- hard — too hard 
for her own good — but she was de- 
termined to see. me win if it was 
possible at all. 

And the people of the town were 
behind me — to a great extent. There 
wasn't one of them that didn't wish 
me luck-^tell me that they hoped 
to see me win — that they woui'd do 
all they could to help me. And ' I 
saw that they did; I wanted sub- 
scriptions — and I got them. 

All in all, it was a long week and 
a hard one — a week marred by dis- 
appointments and Jieart-stopping 
failures at times — but nevertheless 
in the main successful. Along about 
this time. I began to bear terrible 
rumors concerning the vote strength 
of certain' rival candidates. Such 
and such a young lady, so my in- 
formers said, had such an astonish- 
ing amount of votes as to be pat- 
ently ridiculous. And in almost all 
cases of such rumors, I found that 
.the contestant claiming to have the 
most votes usually had the least. 
I simply made up my mind that 
they couldn't frighten me or dis- 
courage me — I was stubborn enough 
to determine that I wouldn't give 
them the. satisfaction of believing 
they had frightened me out of the 
ri.ee. I WENT AHEAD AND WORK- 
ED IN SPITE OP IT ALL 

My last order went in at ten 
o'clock Saturday night — the closing 
hour of the campaign. We had work- 
ed all day Saturday for every mo- 
ment of the time— I ate nothing from 
six in the morning until eleven at 
night— and the Colohci' smoked at 
least half a box of hi s favorite ci- 
gars, one after another. Mother was 
ternb.y. tired and excited— too ner-j 
vous to sieep— but I forced her to 



bed and rest, nevertheless; 
And then the Coi'onel anl I sat on 
anxious-seat, as the negroes 
it—literally sharking with sup- 
sed anxiety and worry — until the 
evening at ten oc'lock. 
shrilt whistle at the gate, and I 
out to see- what was happening. 
A. D. T. messenger, of the 
usuU gum-chqwinff-cigurteffe-rofcing 
type leisura'y extracted a yelibw en- 
velope from. several stuck nap-haz- 
ard beneath his cap brim, ana thrus- 
it ao me 

'Sign 'er— " and he handed me a 
stubby pencil and a slip. 

"Art right— here you are—" and 
I started to open the envelope, with 
linge-s that trembled and shook in 
spite of me. 

"Mos' gen'Iemen gen'r'Iv gives me 
suini thin', when I comes 's fur's this 
— yeSsir, yeseir— t'ankt— " and he 
was oh'. 



The telegram contained just ten 
v* ord*- • 



\(p WIN FIRST PRIZE AUTO- 
MOBILE. DEEPEST CONGRATU- 
LATIONS. FULL DETAILS FOL- 

Mother, in the kitchen clear across 
the louse, heard my wild whoop— 
and I verily believe that the Colonel, 
two miles away, did also, for I had 
hard!/ finished reading the telegram 
to mdher when the telephone rang 

"Bib? *» Say, I bet old Joe MiUer 
three to one that you had won first 
•••h( came over just now to collect 
it***" WHAT? ***• GREAT!! ** 
Be right over!!" and he slammed 



Tin 
I can 
about 
so* as 



the telephone receiver. 



down 

Alt igether it was a great jollifica- 
tion t Hit night— and it was worth it 
And vhen at last I got to bed, I 

slept for eighteen hours straight 

the le -down from- the tension of the 
race. 1 ad been so great. 
******** 

? isn't a whole lot of advice 
:ive you about a campaign — 
how to ,.un your drive- fr votes 
to be sure of victory! — beyond 
this le sentence: 

WOitK ALL THE TIME WITH 
ALL YOUR MIGHT! 

Campaigns are in the main HON- 
EST AND RELIABLE AND ACCUR- 
ATE, feeneral report to the contrary 
notwithstandfjig. For it i 6 gtood 
busim ' " 



for newspapers to build i.p 

a gooi name, as wed as a good cir- 

cn!ntio)i list — and there's only one 

do either. Depend upon it, 

ork and work well you'li' win. 

tick and work Don't 



eolation 
way t 1 
if you w 
Sinipfj 



ret. dceouraged — don't let anyone 



persna le. 
Work w 
can fii d 
always 



first piizi 
He : 



lighter and a worker — not a 
flutter or a v.-hiner. Trust to your 



own el 
your op,- 
WIN 

And-- 
fuel; in I 



I0^MAKKE1£ 



P?r 



Wheat, 

Wheat, 

Wheat, 

Wheat, 

Durum 

Durum 

Durum 

Durum 

Oats 

Rye, pe|- 

Barley, 

Flax, N 

Flax, N< 

Bran, p 

Shorts 

Tessu n 
Cracked 
Whoie 
Hay 
-Mirtd 
Oil meal 



pe- 
Ilings, 



Hens, 
Heavy 
Roosters 
Turkeys 
Horse hi les 
Calf hides 
Horse hides 
Eggs, 

T.R 
Butter, 
tt.itterfa 
Milk 



pq 



, per 




yon to drop out 011 slow up. 

herever and whenever you 

an opportunity — and work 

with only one aim: The 



irt and your own ability and 
stamina — AND YOU'LL 

■here's wishing you 'oil the 
he world! 

THE END 



Hanson & BarzeD 

S'o. 1 northern, per bu. $2.66 

s'o. 2 northern, per bu. 2.61 

s'o. 3 northern per bu. 2.56 

s'o. 4 northern, per bu. 2.36 

wheat, No, 1, per bu. 2.64 

heat, No. 2, per bu. 2.61 

wheat, No. 3, per bu. 2.56 

•beat, No. 4, per bu. 2.49 

"f- .88 

bu. 2.03 

Per bu. .1.02 

1, per bu. 3.20 

2 per bu. 3.15 

■r cwt 2. SO 

;ier cwt. 2.90 

Seed, Grain & Supply Go. 



Corn, per cwt 
>"n, per cwt. ' 

bale 

, per cwt. 



Tjiief River Produce Co. 

per lb 
liens, per lb 
per lb 
per lb 

.03® 



h . -04 to 

r doz. 

Co-Operatlve Creamery 

] ler lb 
, per lb 
quart 



al Publications 



Notice of Sale of Bonds 

School District No. 15, Pennington 
County,' :iIinnesota. 

Public notice is hereby given that 
bids will be received by the School 
Board ofj School District No. 15, 
Penning! >n County, Minnesota, at 
Clerk's office in Mavie, in said Dis- 
trict on the 30th, day of Jm'v, 1920 
until S o ci'ock P. M, for School 
Bonds is.'ued by said District for the 
purpose if erecting and equipiug a 
new school house in said District 
ennington County, Minne- 
bonds to be in the nggre- 
int of $9,500.00, in de.nom 



No. 15, : 

sola, sail 
gate amo 




mations >f $500.00 each, to be If) 
111 • numbi r and numbered from 1 to 
19 inclusive, payable semi-annunii'y 
on the lsl days of January and July 
of each j ear until paid, to be dated 
J«i.v 1, : 920, and to be absolutely 
due and payable July 1st, 1035 



without option of prior payment. 

No bids will be received for less 
than apr and accrued interest and 
the right to reject any and ail bids 
is reserved by the board. Ail bids 
must be unconditional and accom- 
panied by ah unconditional certified 
check payable to the order of the 
Treasurer of said School District for 
$500.00 The School Hoard will 
furnish the legal opinion o: Ei'mer 
L. Williams of Minneapolis, Minn., 
as to the legality of said, issue. 

Ail bids shall be addressed to 
Carl Talley, Ci'erk. 

By order of the Schoo; Board of 

School District No. 15, Pennington 

County, Minnesota. 

| Dated this 13th day of June 3920. 

Carl Tali'ey 

Clerk of Schooi District No. 15, 

Pennington County, Minn. 



mnm 



Notice To Contractors 

Sealed proposals will be received 
at the office of the Town clerk of 
tile Town of North, County of Pen- 
nington, State of Minnesota until 
Two o'clock P, M. on the 31st day 
of July 1920 for the construction of 
two piers and one abutment on the 
Long Bridge. Plans for the proposed 
work may be seen at the Town clerk's 
office Thief River Fal'.'s, Minn. 

July lib, 1920. 

T. H. Bjerke 
Town Glerk, Town of North. 

July 9-16-23 



Wait!— Don't Operate! 

Take Sto.li.gaI, a doctor's prescrip- 
tion tor dissolving gall stones, and 
complicated sotmach ailments. 

One box gives instant relief in all 
cases of GALL STONES, liver and 
stomach trouble, such as. indigestion, 
dyspepsia, chronic appendicitis, gas 
sour stomach, ulcers, catarrh, pains' 
in stomach and back, constipation, 
etc. _ Don't wait but get a box of 
Sto.li.gal front your druggist today 
Price $1 Attention! No fake tes- 
timonials, but positive facts. Sto-li. 
gal has helped thousands of people 
and. it wpll positively give you relief 
in all ailments mentioned regardless 
of your age or duration of trouble. 
Write for- free literature to Dept. f! 
Digestivef Chemical Company, St 
Paul, Minn. Sold in Thief "River 
Falls, by Dr. H. B. Newell, Lambert's 
Pharmacy, also leading druggists 
everywhere. 



Page Three 




Wm. J. BROWN 

Lawyer 

Formerly County Attorney 

Marshall County 

Office Over First National rJank 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



SURE, WE'RE GOING! 

You'll call them the finest exhibits in 
the world when you see them at the 

Minnesota State Fair 

September 4 to 11 




Big Reasons 
Why You Should 
Prefer an Ideal 



6 



of Zf^^^^ZJ??, f?!™^]? • bi * "•»** -d-ne: it is built 
chanMlSrXSLr^ People of keeping the straw moving. There's absolutely no 

Thf^oSfj^S^I?^ 8 •"" % «"*> i* just as important as producing it-of course. 

yon no "dockage" at the elevator" c tod of dcanm i ^t (!<** 

^Tho He^t^ imb? '^n PuU apartl "* " "*■ M ^^ «■ bolted members 
•STm, 5 ?" a ""^Pfe" 5 job— sdl., posts, deck rails, straw rack rides ' Then!fW 

E£^ n3'. TSS*, *""*"• » nd "" » haker b^B^beaSg, Arming ta aljusSw! 
boxes, That's the kind of construction that insures long life. aajuatabie 

No Vibration— Vibration makes a young machine old before it has amm t n, «„,—:.. 

SSvmTnlrt e in b te I^JL^ 7^ OUt of ^^- cSi£hlSSrf3j 
moving porta to the Ideal-perfect balancing of the cylinder— make the Rumdvso rtVadS 
rmmmg that when comparted to other separators vibration dmply d« 8 noTerist ^ 

Al¥b\£rm£rS££ OU 2f".!L ha v e to 7 awI jDsUe *"» Ideal to *«' « «>* working parts. 
ma C h^also^lSr«^r n<3,t " ,md *V** tioa * ^ »"** are on the outside o?2e 
maehtae, also all pi and grease cups, where you can take care of them while the Ideal U 

Hie Ideal is buUt in eve-sites— 22i36, 28x44, 28x48, 32x52 and 36x60. 



Vi^ 





Thief 



Peoples Auto Company 

River Falls, Minn. 






wh— a 



aam. ..; 




m The Tribune 

SEMI-WEBKLT 



ESTABLISHED 1801 



Official County Paper 



Pennington Printing Company 
Publishers 



Thog. A. TVay, President 



jt'PtibliBned every Tuesday and Friday 



Thief Iiker Falls, Minn. 



B. B. McTCillinms, Editor and Manager 



Fcrfirh Advertising Representative 
THE ,1 MERiCAN PRESS ASSOCIATION ■ 



.'! Entered as second class matter at the 
l.'poBt office at ;Thief Rirer Fails, '■■ Minn.. 
-Wilder the Act of March 3, 1STO. 



•: Candidate Cox announces he is in 
icomplete accord with Wilson on all 
'League policies. Now we all know 
iwhere we stand. 



Mrs Peter Olson has been bared 
as a democratic orator in Minneapolis 
because of her failure in San Fran- 

icisco to stand by political friends. 

. Such is "pay roll politics. 



. .Ex-President Taft ( stand-pat . ideal 
of the Shaw-McGinn-Ross-Times) k 
; advocating a combination between. 
; democrats and sore head republicans 
.' in N Dakota to defeat Frazier. The 
more we see of Taft and his under- 
studies, in opposition to the League, 
\ the more we are convinced of the jus- 
itice.and propriety of the League 
cause. 



! 
1 



rankest and mosi 
thi s country, 
distress, but 
Maiket control' 
commence in th< 
merce and in 
wholesale and 
give their orders 
us, they tell us 
ail economic tr 
will' come from 
some day it will 
intolerance. 



flagrant variety in 

! have unrest and 

apparently no redress. 

credit control 

Chamber of Com- 

big city banks, 

jobbing houses. They 

They do not as(t 

Our .troublesV are 

The remedy 

above by tolerance or 

:omc from below by 



the 



■o lbles. 



Rev. O. J. Kvi 
tion • for eongresi 



!e won the nomiua- 
the seventh 
district by about 3,000 votes. He 
put out a circuh r ' about Volstead, 
attacking his re igious beVief. that 
proved to be un rue, and the courts 
minister the right 
to be on the tidket. The case has 
been appealed t< the supreme court 
of the state, lira. Kvale ha s been 
in the primaries he is now in the 
courts. Next co: lea the election, and 
finally he wL!l l:s in congress or in 
the soup. We suspect that 3,000 
majority wa 3 fo; 1 Kvale and not es 
peciatly against Voi'stead. The same 
vote mav^i-egister again at thd polVs, 
While Kvale was doubtless wrong in 
his Plan of campaign, it YookR pretty 
slim for an o'.dtilner like Voi'stead to 
try to get into congress by court 
,'action. 



We have on hand a limited supply, 
i of farmer's bulletin 797, a govem- 
:ment phamplet on sweet clover. These 
; books are sent to us through the in- 
! fluence of Congressman Halvor Steen- 
: erson, and are for free distribution. 
, The fact that Congresman Steenerson 
jhas noticed the keen interest taken 
j in sweet clover in Pennington county 
[and has sent along the books shows 
'how alert he is on all matters or m- 
j terest to his district. "Plant sweet 
1 clover, vote for Halvor, and you'll 
I pt/t one over on November, election 
; day. / 

I. Ex. Governor of Iowa Warren" 
' Garst and wife, Warren (Jurat, Jr.. 
and wife ami Miss Garst of Dos 
Moines, Iowa, spent the forenoon 
today in the city visiting with Iowa 
friends. They were enroute from 
Winnipeg to the lake region where 
they intend to stop for a few days- 
The party travelcd-in a large Hudson 
touring car, had been out two weeks 
— were camping and enjoying the 
trip immensely. Governor Garst* has 
been in public life in Iowa for a-de- 
cade. Hois a big man honest, out 
spoken, fearless and capable. He 
has friends wherever Iowa people 
are to' be found. ISt'caiise' of his 
■natural'' graciousness he could not go 
by without spending a few hours 
■with/the Iowa colony here. 



Wool is cheap, clothing is high. 
Cattle an; cheap, meat is high. Hides 
are cheap, shoes are high. The wool, 
cattle and hide- are the farmers pro- 
/flucts-.- The clothing. :i:eat (dressed 
and cured) and shoes are the manu- 
facturers products. .There is a profi- 
teering and niarket control of the 



■ The booster orowd next Tuesday 
are requested to notice the roads 
from Thief Rivet Falls to Warroad. 
This 103 miles offroad is the best long 
road out of Thief River Falls, and 
has been the best all summer. On 
this road are Sjteiner, Holt, 'Middle 
River, Strathcona, Greenbush and 
the Roseau county towns. The Jef- 
ferson Highway should follow this 
route at least as far as Greenbush. 
We will have a pkved road (under the 
Babcock law) onlthis route in a very 
short time, under the same law we 
will have a paved road to Warren on 
the north. Wei will never have a 
paved road on the present Jefferson 
Highway location across Marshall 
county The towrjs above named are 
our natural friends. Let's get to 
working with them. They can and 
will help us much more than we can 
help them. Study this Jefferson 
Highway proposition and be prepared 
to talk on your! trip. There is no 
way you can render your own .town 
a greater service'. Instead of asking 
these people for ! omething offer them 
something, offer them your coopera- 
tion in the mate: of re-locating this 



road where they 
it will do us the 



LABOR COMPARING COX AND 



HARDING 



Washington — 
l'abor records of 
Cox and Warren 
cratie and repubii 
didates will be 
can' Federation 
data on the can 
federation'! 
forms. The stat 
cratie platform (! 
cratie platform 
progress not 
the republican 



f out d 



want it, and where 
most good_ 



comparison of the 
Governor James M. 
G. Harding, demo- 
:*an presidential can- 
ued by the Ameri- 
Labor soon. The 
lidates followed the 
on both pi'at 
Binent on the demo- 
ays that the "demo- 
narks a measure of 
in the platform of 
ty." 



df 



state ments 



wager, in whofe or in part, at odds 
of 2% to 1, that Senator Harding 
would be ejected president of the 
United States. The best odds here- 
tofore prevailing have been 2 to 1. 
Another stock exchange firm of- 
fered to bet $10,000 off' Cox to be 
elected, but demanded odds : of 3. to 1? 
Neitner of these wagers has been 4 
placed. 



A FEW EXTRACTS 

Extracts from a letter from a big 
wholesale cloth merchant to a tailor 
customer: . 

"As regards all fine goods, such as 
you , and every high grade custom 
tailor requires, and such as we deal 
in, there mil be no reduction in the 
prices possibly prior to mid-summer; 
1921, and probably not then." 

Because -the controlled woolen fac- 
tories are shut down to keep up the 
price of cloth. 

"Foreign worsteds for spring next 
year will cost you from $5 to $15' per 
suit pattern more than you paid in 
the spring of 1920. ' Instead or such 
goods being more plentiful, there will 
be fewer of them obtainable and deli- 
veries will he much delayed. Nearly 
everything published in the news- 
papers on this subject is apparently 
based upon absolute ignorance of the 
present condition -and future prob- 
abilities." 

Disregard the market reports, the 
statements of Congressional corns., 
the complaint of farmers because 
wool is low, and the howl of the cus- 
tomers because cloth is high. Shut 
your eyes and ears to all common 
sense information, statistics and all 
facts. We know it all, we and our 
affiliated price-juggling in-betweeners 
control the market. The public is 
ignorant. 

"You need in your judgment, have 
no anxiety yet about future prices. 
We know exactly and precisely where- 
of we speak, and we shall take good 
care that our customers have tfmely 
warning as to when we think caution 
will be advisable." 

In ordinary business, cautjon is 
prudence and- a proper business re- 
quisite, but here are brokers who in- 
sure their customers against even 
caution — follow us,, do as we tell you 
and you will wear diamonds. 

If the above is not an admission and 
a boast of control, we do not read it 
correctly. 



Don't Wait for the Custom Thresher— 



Do Your Own Work With an 



Those alluring curve s of the fem- 
inine form are rapidly ceasing to be 
attractive. The masculine mind 
soon- loses interest in anything that 
becomes common. 



We have reconsidered our hard 
and fast rule pf not publishing the 
effusion of : local poets. We now 
make a modest charge of a dollar a' 
line, cash up and no discount. 



■B GEISER' 



An E-B Geiser Thresher for Your Individual Work 



is the Best 



Buy, because-- 



many 



The E- B Geiser is not an experiment It is a proven success with 
years of satisfactory service at home and abroad to its credit. 

It is a small, compact machine with a big capacity. There is no waste 
space — it's all thresher and will do a clean job of threshing. i J 

It cleans the grain without sieves. The cleaning is done by combs and 
grooved rollers, and is mechanically perfect. 

It runs light— it hauls light — it is light. It has few parts and no unnecessary 
material to add weight. It is efficiently designed and built by skilled Workmen. 

The E-B Geiser is not a Junior, but a real threshing machine capable of 
doing, at your convenience, as efficient work as any big thresher. 

t 



Rambeck-Stone 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 



$50,000 OFFERED ON 
ODDS 

New York — The announcement was 
made by James 

a prominent stoc^k exchange firm had 
placed 





Farmer* 
Checking 
Accounts 



A CHECKING 
business necessity 
farmer. It provides a 
record of income from 
stock and other sources 
check drawn against thi 
is a legal receipt. 

IN harvest, feeding, 
season — all the year 
the "checkbook" way is 
venient way of handing farm 
finances. 



Citizens State 



MEAT! MEAT! MEAT! 

The Cheapest Thing You Can Eat 



Do you know of a single food item that you use for your table for the whole 
family that will give as much satisfaction as meat? We have the reduced 
price on our meats for SATURDAY to such a low plane that it commands your 

attention. Why deprive yourself and family of this great satisfaction when you can have meat at 
the following prices. .'.-"'.. 

Look at These Prices 



MEATS 

Veal Stew, per pound 
Veal Shoulder, roast, per lb. 
Veal Leg Roast, , . 
Beef Roast, chuck 
Bacon Squares 
Home rendered Lard 
Beef Short Ribs ..'.. 



16c 

20 

25 

22 

30 

25 

17c 



GROCERIES 

Sugar, by the sack 28.75 

Get yours now. 

35c Coffee, 5 lbs. for... 1.50 

5 cans of Sweet Corn.. 90 

Only 5 cans to each customer 

Laundry Soap, per bar T _. ;,.'_. .05 

1 bars to each customer 

Toilet Soap, per bar ..... .08 

Cookies, per lb., T ...24 

Mason Fruit Jars, pints 95c 

quarts 1.05 
. half gallon 1.20 



CHICKENS: Fancy corn fed, Saturday only 28c per lb. Dressed to order. 

If you cannot come to our market to make your selections just phone 115 and we will deliver it free 
of charge to door. We pay the highest cash prices for all stock and produce. See us before selling. 



Simonsan's Meat & Grocery Market 

« '" '■ •"*' } "A iooVlJleaii Market" 



Telephone 1 1 5 



Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



'■^^.'.'. : S'v'" ! "'^'- : ' ) %i* . '■_■ ' Vj&rr?M': 









maa*mmmam 



-; — 






__il . . — r 

FRIDAY, JULY 33. I9JQ 



*IPff^lT" 



-^r-.r^—. J - m reg=^nrrr T^frr.- 



THE TRIBUNE 



^ i*- 



Page Five 






IS THE LAST WEEK 
Don't Be Late at The Finish! 



HpHE Tribune's magnificent and generous $3,600 automobile campaign-a campaign embodying the richest 
^ and largest array of rich awards^ ever offered In a circulation campaign in northern Minnesota-closes next 
Saturday evening, July ■ 31 st at 8 o clock. At that hour, the offices of the management of th 
great campaign will close— no more ballots or subscriptions will be accepted at this office. 



Trib 



unes 



At that hour, the person standing highest in votes will win the luxurious Buick "Six" the greatest six-cvlinder car in A™,-;™ 
And it rests with] you who that person shall be You have right now as much chance to win thf Bu ck "sfx"as any of you^ rivals' 
You have just as^ many friends, just as much ability and just as great an opportunity— if vou take advanttme nf that „„L J ri 
without delay arid work harder than ever during the next' eight days. You^an ^lif^^J^STSS^ of theTast days 
count. So-make it a whirlwind finish. Work every moment of the time at top speed-work all the time with the utmost effi 
ciency and the least amount of wasted time and effort. You have only a small number of rivals but eveTy one of them S a dat 
WORrHARDER y ANrTwiN' " ' t0 ^ Make ever y moment count-make every effort count for vfcTory 



District No. One 



Harry Lund, city 600,000 

Mrs. Edwin O. Erickson, city 008,000 
O. L. ' Cronstrom, city .... G03,000 
Sirs. L. Hermanson, city . . 10,000 

Robert Halvorson, city 452,000 

Leo Milier, city 10,000 



Mrs! Henry Sandee, RPD, city 10,000 

Julius Liden, RFD, city 10,000 

Mrs Thomas Rowan, city .. 585,000 

LueHa Peterson, city 00,000 

Mrs. H. F. Borcen, city .... 10,000 



District No. Two 



Betty Johnson, Holt ....100,000 
Sylvia Pierson, St.- Hilaire 015,000 
Maitlia Ajbin, PJummer . . 003,000 
Ethe! Anderson, Wylie .... 95,000 
Borghild Berg, .Middle River 10,000 
Mrs. E. Singer, Erie 000,000 



Guilder Tviet, Golden Valley 400,000. 
Arthur 0,'son, Middle River 10,000 
Emma Anderson, Middle River 10,000 
B. a. Norby, Goodridge .... 110,000 
Mrs. C. E. Lundgren, Viking 00,000 



You can win, by applying harder efforts to your work-by working harder to secure votes 
which alone can win a prize You can win, by working with all your might- -by not ^ 
Kfe^ You, can winf if yoX 

to work---KbALLY WORK----for the.short time remaining of the campaign 
+• ~ a * W ? t e eE P Yt — lf 7™ win you will receive a reward worth many times the 
time and effort you have invested. You CAN win, if you simply work hard to oasT everv 

and whenever possible Work as hard a/you can. Do the best work possible e ^ ^ u can * affof d not to win. Work wherever 



Here are Your Final Instructions- 
Read Them Carefully 



Study the following explanations 
regarding the closing details of the 
great prize race. If they are not per- 
fectly clear, ask for further informa- 
tion by mail, phone, or jij person. 

FIRST— All votjes or subscriptions 
' to count in the campaign must be in 
the hands of- the Manager of the auto- 
mobile campaign !by eight o'clock on 
Saturday night, Ji ily 31st. (By votes 
is meant the vot( certificates or the 
ballots issued wh(n subscriptions are 
tamed in.) • 

SECOND— The Manager's office will 
be open to candidates thruout the en- 
tire count of votes. Votes and sub- 



Fou Can Win 



scriptions can be turned in up to 8 
o'clock, but no subscriptions will be 
accepted after that hour. 

THIRD — No orders may be mailed 
for credit in the offices of the Auto- 
mobile Campaign Department after 6 
p. m. Friday evening, July 31st. In- 
asmuch as candidates are requested to 
be present at the final count, which is 
to be open to all interested parties, it 
is suggested that these candidates be 
sure to bring in their final orders at 
the same time. 

FOURTH— The final vote count to 
be published by the management of 
the Tribune's automobile campaiga 
will be made for next Tuesday's pub- 



lication in the Semi-Weekly Tribune. 
From that time forward, a sealed and 
locked ballot box will be in the offices 
of the manager, in which all orders 
can be placed. Candidates can if they 
wish, bring in their orders, and de- 
posit them in this box there to remain 
' until the final count by the judges, 
.which will commence immediately 
after 8 p. m_ Saturday evening. 

FIFTH— All subscriptions to be 
counted in the Tribune's great prize 
. race must be fully covered by a re- 
mittance of cash, draft, certified check 
or money order. Use exceptional care 
in listing subscriptions, and write all. 
names plainly. All additional instruc- 



tions concerning subscriptions, as to 
time of starting, etc., must be marked 
plainly. Orders mailed to be accept- 
ed for the final count must be sent 
Special Delivery and directed to the 
Manager Automobile Campaign De- 
partment, The Semi-Weekly Tribune, 
Thief River Falls, Minn. 

SIXTH— The final count will be 
closed in time to give candidates or- 
ders for their prizes, so that the win- 
ners of the cars may have them for 
use on Sunday, August 1st. The count 
wlli be open at all times and com-j 
plaints or corrections can be made to 
the judges, to be passed upon by 
them. 



Do Your Mi Work Now and Win the Buick "Six" 







:^;it<j - -.Sep.' ■•■■'.iW:Wt2ca?:ISi.-:-.- ; ..;.^|fef : . .'.Vfe^Xp- 



'*^^t£iij>ijs&M 







vis 



+- 



Page Six 




THE TRIBUNE 



\L 



FRIDAY. JULY 33, *93<> 



fieighborhood J^etvs.. 

Contributed by The Tribune's Wide-Awa\e Correspondents 




GERMANTOWN 

Misses Delia anil Bessie Roiler 
were shoppers at Mavie one day last 
week. 

Louis Bendiekson and son, Ber- 
nard, were business callers at Thief 
Kiver Falls last Tuesday afternoon. 

Miss Hattie Kockman tvas a cali'er 
at Germantown ast Wednesday. 

Bemiee Struble visited with Euth 
Boyce last Monday. 

Henry Roller and daughters, Delia 
and Bessie, motorSl to Thief River 
Falls last Friday. 

Hens Dalu' caUed at the L. Ben- 
diekson home one evening last week. 

Rose Vakoeh was a Germantown 
caller on Wednesday. 
■ Messrs Oscar Hovelson and Hilbert 
Berve motored to Thief River Falls 
last Thursday. 

Bernard Bendiekson was a caller 
at the Hans Dahl home last Tuesday 
evening, 

Mrs. Serphiue Holland and children, 
Augustine, I-ucy, Louise and Mar- 
shall, were guests at the Hans Dahi' 
home last Friday afternoon. 

Lawrence Nelson returned home re- 
cently from'International Falls where 
he has been empiojed. 

Bernard Bendiekson was a business 
caller at Thief River Falls last Thurs- 
day. 

Delia and Bessie Roiler were shop- 
pers at Thief River Falls last Mon- 
day. 

H. Dahl was a Goodridge caller 
on Friday. 
- Mr. and .Mrs. Jno. Aandabl were 
guests at the H. Dahi' home Sunday.- 
-51r. :.nd Mrs. H. Roller and family 
visited at the E. Ristau home Sun- 
day. 

Messrs Arlo and Maurice Aandahl 
were Sunday guests, at the D. Dan 
home. ' ! 

Miss Lillian Freiiall was a Mavie 
calier last Thursday. 

Mrs. Hans Dahl visited at the 
Martinus Johnson home last Tues- 
day. / 

Silva Bendiekson was a German- 
town caller/ one day last week. 

Henry Klcekmim was a caller at 
Thief River Falls last Friday. 

Mrs. Hans Dahl visited at the Ser- 
aphine/Rollaiid home Tuesday. 

Miss Sih y a Bendiekson shopped at 
Thief River Falls Thursday. 

Mr.' and Mrs. Olaf Tharaldson and 
children Gehart a:id Silva and Henry 
Tharldson called at the Bendiekson 
homo Monday. 

Mrs. Sanders and daughter, Julia 
called at the O. I\ Nelson home Mon. 
day. 



Miss Ida Peterson of Warren is 
visiting at the home of her sister, 
Mrs. B. StyrVund of this place. 

Mrs.' Frank Leech went to War- 
ren last week where she will seek 
medical aid. [. 

Rev. Drotts officiated at the Y. P. 
S. in Rosewodd. Saturday evening and 
at the services Sunday forenoon and 
evening. J 

The local ball team played a fast 
game with Marshgrove last Sunday 
resulting in a score of 13 to 14 in 
favor of Vik ng. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gust Peterson and 
the Fred Pet srson family of Warren 
spent Sunday evening at O. LindelVs 

The John Nelson family motored 
to Rosewood Sunday afternoon to at. 
tend the christening of the Carl 
Mellem baby] 

Mesdames John Gustafson and 
Jacobson were Ai'varado callers one 
days of the past week. 

Mr. and llrs. Albert StyrlunjL and 
children were Sunday guests at the 
Albert Peterson home. 

C. Lundgr^n and son, Helmer, ar- 
rived Illinois last week. 

Next Saturday evening at the 
Swedish Mission church the ladies' 
aid wili hold their annual auction 
sale. Ice cream and cake will he 
soul. Everybody is cordially invited 
to attend. I 

The memb'ers of the Grand Forks 
Commercial Club passed thru Viking 
Friday. Oui town was among sev- 
eral pi'aces which were honored with 
a visit of tiis touring party. The 
band played jseveral selections which 
were appreciated. Their next stop 
ping point was Rosewood. 



Mrs. H.'O. Jackson and Mrs. Karl 
B. Johnson left Monday for brief 
visits at Crookston, Bemidji and near 
Euclid. 

Mrs. A. Potvin and two children 
left Wednesday for their home at 
Cass Lake, after a visit at the home 
of Mrs. Potvin's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. P. Simonson. They were accom- 
panied by Misses Serina and Pearl 
Simonson. 

Mr. and Mrs. V. Loftgern accom- 
panied by the hitter's mother, Mrs. 
F. Hed, motored up the latter part 
of last week from their home near 
St. Peter to visit at the A. J. Hed 
home. 

Anton E. Anderson, a prominent 
farmer of Rocksbury township, was 
attacked by an angry bull Wendes- 
day of last week and was badly 
bruised in the encounter. 

Miss Selma HaiVerson, of Duluth, 
is a guest at the N, A. Nelson home. 

Owing to a mistake the Kiltie 
band which gave a concert here 
Tuesday evening, was not widely ad- 
vertised, but those who attended were 
highly pleased with the performance 
and deplored the fact that so few 
had the opportunity of enjoying it. 

After transacting business in this 
section of his territory E. T. Gestie 
motored ,to Crookston Thursday 
morning. He was accompanied by 
his sister, Mrs. Carl Johnson, who 
boarded the train at Crookston en- 
route to Fosston to visit relatives, 

St. Hilaire was well represented at 
the excellent open-air convcer't given 
by the Million Dbllar band at Thief 
River Falls, Wednesday evening, 
July 21st.. I 

A class of seven boys and girVs is 
to be confirmed at the Norwegian 
Lutheran church Sunday, July 25. 



Women who have been married 
for four yeais and have not become 
mothers, are granted immediate di- 
vorce and are subject to the same 
orders, to hasten their re-marriage. 
All women affected by the proclama- 
tion are ordered to register Imme- 
diately and later will be condncted 
to the winter palace for marriage in 
squads. , 

The report says that the state has 
taken charge of all children over 
tttree years of age, and that family 
life in Russia is completely disor- 
ganized. 



WOMAN'S CASE AMAZES 

THIEF R(VER FALLS 



A business man's wffe could not 
sew or read without sharp pains in 
her eyes. For years her eyes were 
red and weak. Finally she tried sim- 
ple witchhazel, camphor; hydrastis, 
as mixed in Lavopik eye wash. 



etc., 



VIKING ! 

The Sunday school children o£ the 
Swedish Mission church he fd their 
annual summer festival Sunday after- 
noon at the beautiful home of Peter 
Erickson four miles south of Viking. 
The children rendered a good program 
consisting of recitations and songs 
which were greatly appreciated. Rev. 
Sogers! rbin delivered a very interest- 
ing and instructive sermon. Ice 
crwim and cake was served to ail 
present. A large crowd attended and 
ivfcrybody enjoyed themselves, the 
day being ideal for picnicing. We 
wish to express our sincere thanks 
to the Peter Erickson family 'or their 
kindness in having the festival at 
their home. 

Mrs. Engvid Lundgren spent the 
past week in Warren. 



ST. HILAIRE 

Mrs. C. FqUman of Red Lake Fails 
arrieved Friday for a brief visit with 
friends in tile village. 

The Skeiej esidence, one of the 
oldest landmarke of the village, has 
been taken (lown and removed by a 
recent purchaser. 

Mrs. A. II. Gunstad and daughter, 
Miss Lily, returned Friday from a 
visit with relatives in North Dakota. 

The Norwegian parochial school 
closed last qriday and its completion 
was marked by a very successful 
picnic in tht Martz grove last Sun- 
day. 

Mrs. Huge and son, Hawley, of 
Detroit, and! Miss Bertha Moses, of 
Pelican Rapids were recent guests at 
the N. E. Bcjebe home. 

Miss Anna Vik returned Friday 
from a .visit) with friends at Twin 
Vaifley and Detroit. 

The baseli'all team of Oklce crossed 
bats with thjb St. Hilaire team on the 
local diamond last Sunday and the 
-game result h1 in a victory for the 
latter with 1 score of 2 to 9 in their 
favor. 

Mrs. Wni. Olson and son, Harwood, 
went to Str; thcona Saturday to visit 
at the hom-j of the former's sister, 
Mrs. r. S. I airard. 

The ladies' aid of he Norwegian 
Lutheran cl urch i s entertained this 
afternoon in the church by Mesdames 
S. Benson, K. O. Gigstad and Neil 
Dahl 

Mr. and Mrs. I. R. Severtson of 
Crookston visited with friends in the 
village for a brief time Saturday. 

D. Collins and two children re- 
turned Mom ay to their home at War- 
road, after having spent a few days 
with relatives and friends at Wylie 



BOLSHEVIKI GIVEN PICK OF ■ 
WOMEN IN 'WEEK OF LOVE' 

Cross-Atlantic Newspaper Service. 
— Copyright. Special to Minneapolis 

Copenhagen, July 10. — "A week 
of love has been proclaimed 



GRANGE OFFICIAL SCORES 

FARMERS IN NEW PARTY 

Public Ledger-Minneapolis Tribune 
Service.. Copyright, 1920, by Public 
Ledger Co. 

Washington, July 16.— Condemna. 
tion of the participation of the farm 
elements of the United States in any 
partisan movement such as just has 
been effected by the Farmer-Labor 
party in its convention In Chicago 
was voiced today by T. C. Atkeson, 
Washington representative of the Na- 
tional Grange, one of the oldest farm 
organizations in the United States. 
Mr. Atkeson says that although the 
entry of the American farmer into 
partisan politics in the 70's and the 
80's accomplished some of the things 
that were contemplated, the move- 
ments "failed of real achievement." 

The conclusion reached by the Na- 
tional; Grange official is such that 
partisan participation in politcal 
strife is bound to prove "detrimental 
to American agriculture." 

"The experience of the Grange has 
been," says Professor Atkeson, "that 
in partisan polities or any alliance 
with partisan groups or class organi- 
zations for political purposes is detri- 
mental' not only to the best interests 
of the Grange, but also to the best 
interests of American agriculture. 

"If this is objectionable to individ- 
ual's or other groups who are now 



The result produced by a single bot 
tie amazed ei^ryone. We guarantee 
a small botdBLavoptik to help ANY 
CASE weak! strained or inflamed 
eyes. Aluminum eye cup FREE. -F. 
J. Stebbins, druggist. T-4 



Hemstitching 
MRS. McKINNEY 

Scaudia Block 

Thone 252 

Hours 1.0 to 12; 1 to 5 



Advertise 'in The Tribune. 



by I seeking to capitalize the high reputa. 

I ' 
Moscow. All .unmarried Women un- j of American farmers, that of itself: 
der 45 are ordered by the decree to i repays the Grange for all that it has j 
marrv any Bolshevik desiring them. ; done." i 



ItpIsIJust as 

DANGEROUS 

to be without adequate Torriedo insurance as it is 
fire insurance. In the majority of cases fire losses 
are not total but when a tornado strikes, it means 
a total loss to everything in its path. 

We have on display in our bank actual kodak 
pictures of the Fergus Falls tornado of last year 
which shows clearly the enormous destruction of 
property in that town. 

Rates Extremely Nominal as fellows: 
Dwelling houses and contents $4 per SlToOO for arrears 
Mercantile buildings and contents $5 per $1,000 for 3 years 

First National Bank 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 
Resources Over One .Million Dollars 



and in this 



♦ M M M ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ H ♦ ♦ » H H H t H H ♦ M H ♦ » 



tnt i ititiii i iin' 



BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE 



HRE 

INSURANCE 




village. 



we advise and urge you to 
call on us once and secure 
a fire insurance poYicy. We 
will guarantee to place your 
insura ice in force with the 
best < ompany immediately. " 
Insure your house, your 
furnitnre, fittings, wearing 
appardl, etc. 



Lawrence Mtg. Co. 



315 Alain Ave. N. 




Phone 443 



The Oldsmobile "Six" Sedan 

THIS season's Model 37-B Sedan is in its essentials 
the roomy, serviceable five-passenger enclosed car 
that has for several years proven so popular. It has 
however,undergone a number of refining improvements, 
both in appearance and in appointments. Like the oth- 
er Oldsmobiles, it is finished in distinctive colors, well 
within the dictates of good taste and upholstered in 
harmonizing velours. 

B. J. BAKKE 

Office and Sales Room at Borry's Garage 




HERMANSO.N HARDWARE CO. 



iLW.v-* 



""rffSSsi 



mmmmm 



£££&&■-. 



I 



FRIDAY, JULY 33, 1910 



THE TRIBUNE 



Page 7 



• ■ K 



'^■Is*" 



--H ■ 



-l - 



Pepnington County Agricultural Society 

Presents Its « — — 



NINETEENTH ANNUAL FAIR 

and 

INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



THIEF RIVER FALLS 

Wednes4ay, Thursday and Friday, August 4th, 5th and 6th 

Afternoon and Evening Programs 

Commencing 1:30 P. M. and 8 P. M. 



Owing to the 
will be 
Department 



-at- 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



past growth of the Industrial Department of the Fair this division 

housed in the Auditorium at Thief River Falls comprising the Womans' 

and Boys and Girls Educational Department and exhibits of local 

manufacturers and merchants and will be open to the public day and night. 

. No admission is charged for this exposition. 



Baseball Tournament 

The fastest baseball teams in Northwestern Minnesota will participate in an elim- 
ination tournament for the championship of Northwestern Minnesota during the 
Fair and will compete for purses offered by the Fair Association. 



Th: 



SCHEDULE OF GAMES 



ef River Falls 



vs. St. Hilaire at 3:30 p. m. Wednesday, August 4th 

Red Lake Falls vs. Grygla at 3:45 p. m. Thursday, August 5th 

<I l JThe two winners will play off for the -championship Friday, August 6th, at 
3:30 p. m. Don't miss this exhibition of our national sport. 



The greatest aerial 
introducing Lieut 
of control from an 
Lieut Larabee and 



The Minneapolis Daily News Flying Circus 



attraction obtainable will be featured on THURSDAY, AUGUST 5 th ONLY afternoon and evening, 
Larrabee, "The Flying Squirrel" in death defying aerial acrobatics including his ''Falling Leaf" dropping out 
altitude of 5, 000 feet and righting his plane 80 feet from the ground. Witness the 5 mile race between 
the Giant Falcon, a naval hydroplane on wheels, one of the attractions of the Flying Circus. 



PROGRAM THURSDAY, AUG. 5 



1.30 p. m. 
1:45 p. m. 
2:00 p. m. 
2:15 p.m. 
2:25 p 
2:55 p 
3:15 p 
3:45 p 



m. 
m. 
m. 
m. 



Selections by 
The Atlas 
Brancel & 
The Savages, 
Art Williams 
The Great 
The Minneapoli 
Baseball, Red 



Thief River Falls Band 
Triple Trapeze artists 
performance on the slack wire 
performing on the mechanical revolving ladder. 
, darddevil aviator 
, Ski Jumper 
is Daily News Flying Circus 
Lake Falls vs. Grygla 



'< Trio, 
Dog, 



Si Jfred 



PRICES 



Afternoon 

Adults 50c 

Children 25c 

Automobiles 25c 

Grand Stand 25c- 



Evening 



Adults . 25c 

Children 10c 

Automobiles and 
Grand Stand Free 



Season tickets good for any member of purchasers family for any one 

performance, $2.00 



.;Sfcig£ 



■-"«— 



52RV 



Page Eight 



****■ 



THE TRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JULY 33. .19*° 



1 







I'ev. It. L Bjirackman left Monday 
cvonng for St. Paul. He will! remain 
in that city for a few days and then 
will leave for variolic points in the 
east. lie will rem™ to this city 
about August twenty-second. 

Mrs. GuJingsrud, of Gary, and 
Mrs. II. Haaven. of Plummer return- 
ed to their homes Monday evening, 
after spending a week visiting at the 
John Gu'Iingsrud home. 

Mrs. II. F. Fisher and nephew, 
Gorai'd Turney. returned to their 
lknne in C'olinton, Alberta, after 
spending six weeks visiting with the 
formers sister. Mrs. '1'. -1'. Anderson. 

Wm. Miehelet retimed to this city 
Monday from Minneapolis, where he 
had been c-allel liy the death of his 
father. Mrs. Miel.elet and cliiidrcif 
went to niai-k River Palls, Wis., io 
visit for a short time. 

Win. Mivhelet left a"uesday for 
Ked Lake Fah 1 , where he will attend 
to business matters. 
• K. KVeineison. of Hazel, was in this 
city Wednesday attending to busi- 
ness matters. 

Mrs. Rex Beck and daughter, 
Viola, of Harvey, X. D., have been 
visiting for the past week ' at the 
home of Mrs. Beck's mother, Mrs. P. 
J. Swords. Mr. Beck arrived Wed- 
nesday evening to join his wife and 
will' visit for a couple of day s in 
this city before leaving for their 
home. 

Grant Ohm, who is' employed in 
Bemidji, is spending his vacation at! 
his home in this city. 

O A. Germundson, of Plummer, | 
spent Wednesday in this city at- 1 
tending to business matters. 

Mrs. Thomas Satidus and dauchter, I 
Mary, of Kratka, were among the out 
of town shoppers in this city Wed- 
nesday. ■ 

Miss Ella Reep and cousin motored 

over from Plummer Tuesday. Missi 

Reep will remain in this city for 

some time to receive medical treat- 

~nienc. 

Mrs. Tulle}-, ofiSt. Hilaire. was an 
out. of town visitor ia this city on j 
Tuesday. . j 



Mrs. Albert Johnson returned to this 
city Tue iday morning, after spend- 
ing a few days at the Patterson cot- 
tage at ilapt'e Lake as the guest of 
Mrs. J. M. Bishop. 

Mrs. ]!. Holinstrom and children 
accompanied by Mr 3 . Hodek left 
Tuesday for Calloway where they 
wii'l visit for an indefinite period. 

Mr. ai d Mrs. Iver Hoium accom- 
panied l:y Mrs. J. O. Thorstad, of 
Lnc-khart motored to Grand Forks 
Tuesday where, they will spend a 
few day! visiting They will attend 
the fair :,t the same time. 

Misses Hei'en Langseth: and Helen 
Warner left Tuesday afternoon for 
Grand F>rks where they will attend 
the fair J.ud visit for two weeks with 
the lattecrs cousin. Miss ' Kathleen 
Ures. . ' 

Mrs. .I.E. Mahoney accompanied 
by her taughter, Kathleen, and sis- 
ter. Mari > Lacoe, visited with friends 
ami rolaives in this city between 
trains Ti esday. 

Misses Gunda and Mary Aasland, 
of this city, left Tuesday for Grand 
Forks. >Yhere they will visi,t with 



1 ml relatives for al 



out 



Tliey wi'.j also attend the 



Miss Hlsie 
arrived in tl 
ning. where 
two weeks. 



Krickson, of Staibuek, 
is city Wednesday ere-: 
she will visit for about 
While here rdie will be 



the guest of her cousin. Miss Ethel 
Krickson. 

Melviu Sedig. of Kratka, was in 
' this city Tuesday attending to busi- 
ness matters. . 

Willie liakke relurned to his home 
in this city Wednesday from Detroit, 
where he has been enjoying a weeks' 
vacation 

Neil' Chrislenson,' of .Mahnomen, 
wiio has been confined for some time 
pa-t in the Physicians hospital of this 
city, returned to his home Thursday. 

Win. Girrnlet. of. Goodridgo, was a 
business visitor in this city Wednes- 
day. 

Mrs. lln Reynolds, of this city, left 
Wednesday evening for Minneapolis- 
After n siay-of a few days there she 
wilt continue to Chicago. She ex- 
pects to be gone about two months. 

Kiuiio Olson, of Highlanding, was 
in this city Wednesday consulting 
physicians. 

Tom Scverson and daughter, Min- 
nie, of Hoi't, were, among the out of 
town visitors in this city Tuesday. 

Mrs. Oscar Asp, who has been 

^visiting fur the past few days with 

Mrs. II. E. Gustafson. returned to her 

home in- Minneapolis Wednesday 

evening." 

T. J. Sumpter and son Hubert, of 
Hazel, visited witli friends in this 
city .Tuesday. 

Miss Sybil McGinn, of this, city 
left for Warren Thursday morning, 
where she will! visit with friends and 
matives for a few days. 

Mrs. MngiU. of Keli'ier, will be a 
guest at the J. H. Ilermanson home 
for a few days. 

Mrs W. E. Elofson. who has been 
visiting with friends and relatives in 
Fisher for the past week, returned to 
her home in •Xowfoi'den Tuesday. 

Mrs. P. I.. Vistaunet. who has been 
visiting with her husband the past 
few days, returned home from Hal- 
lock Tuesday. 

Miss Luciiic Burns returned to this 
city from Grand Forks, where she 
had been visiting a few days with 
Miss Lois Wold. , 



friends 
mouth, 
fair. 

Mrs rielina Lacoe, who hfis been 
a resident of this city, left Tuesday 
for Minn 'apolis where she will make 
her futur? home. 

Mr. at d Mrs. Oi'af Storliolm and 
family a id their nephew, Clifford 
Storholm spent Sunday at Maple 
Lake. 

Miss Jj'ice Hanson, formeij grad- 
uate of the Lincoln high sclviol, ar- 
rived in this city from her himie in 
St. Paul on Monday evening . She 
wilt' visit for an indefinite period with 
friends ii th^cit}' 

John Elsted. of Warren nWored 
over to this city Monday to visit 
witli his family. He returned to 
Warren Tuesday. 

Miss iiorothy Loen, of Rad um,ar- 
rived in this city Monday ai d wilt 
remain fir an indefinte periot visit- 
ing witli [friends. 

Miss Ajl ice Paulson returned to her 
home in this city Monday after spend- 
ing a few days visiting with friends 
in Oslo. [ 

Miss Edna Evenson returned to her 
home in Ails -city Monday from Otter- 
tail', wliete she has been visit ng for 
some time with her aunt. 

Miss Dena Olson, of Gully 
in this city Monday evenin 
she wi'.i' visit wth- friends an 
tives for a week! ■ ' 

Mr. and Mrs. Sheggrud, of Hazel, 
arrived in this city Monday to visit 
for a shirt time at the Chris) Stor- 
hdlm home. 



irrived 
where 
1 reja- 



W. SWEDENBERG 

PI ysician and Surgeon 

Eyes Ti sted and Glasses So 
Special Attention Paid t 
Ears, Nose and Thn 

Phone 350 
National Bank Build 



Eyes 



First 



H5W1///M/W* Wholesome. Cleinstng, 
lll"PK?^' Rejreshjng and - 1 " 



Toft iJasHJs* 5 * nes3 " soreness, or uui 
V5\t ■«Jc2t C tiotUtchingand B imi 
TOUR tlLOof the Eyes or $ ell 



H (allng 
Lotion— Murine fo ' Red- 
ness, Soreness, Grpnula* 
fog 
dsi 
irGolC 



2 Drops? After the Movies, Motorini 
will win your^confidence. Ask Your 
•rec-Murine when your Eyes Need Can 
Murine Eye Remedy Co,, 



1. Motoring >r Golf 
isle Your D ruggist 
Iced Care. V 



GJrI. ADKINS 

Physibian and Surgepn 

: Qve 



Offic 



ver First National Bank 



HIGHEST CASH PRICE$ 

Paid for all Kinds 

of 

POULTRY 

at 

DeCremer's Meat 
Market 



The One Food Above All 

It is delicious 

It is wholesome 

It is absolutely the o ily economical 

food to be bought toe ay. 

FRESH EVERY DAY' 

MOTHER'S BREAD! 



iplied 
t 
n% 



Chcaso 



Misses Meta Klfand, Mariam and 
Ella Miller and Lucit'e and Erange- 
I'ine Burns and Messrs. Francis 
Burns and Oscar Paulson returned 
Monday after enjoying a weeks' out- 
ing at Itasca State Park. 

Mrs. AV.. J. Brown and daughter, 
Rutiv returned from Union Lake 
Monday, where they have been spend- 
ing some time at their cottage. 

Mrs. Emil Larson and children of 
Cearbrook, were, shopping and visit- 
ing in this city Monday. 

Miss Rub}' Knutson, . of Gully, ar- 
rived Monday to visit for a short 
time at the P. Engelstad home. 



Classified Wants 



PA1XMXO AND PAPERHANOIXG, 

and interior decorating. First 

• class work. Prices reasonable. — ■ 

Bakken & Sherstad. phones 4943 

or 413. tf. 

WANTED— A TWENTY OR TAVEN- 
ty-two inch breaking;, plow with 
truck. Sigurd Lind, St. Hilaire, 
Minn. 38-2 

AA' ANTED— GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Mrs. M. T. McFarland, 
307 Knight ave. N. 38-tf 

FOR SALE — THRESHING OUTFIT 

- complete for, work. Reeves engine 
and Reeves separator 36-60 with 
garden city wing feeder. Engine 
is a 40-S0 gas tractor with 400 
gallon gas tank 1 tounted on truck, 



8 bottom stuble plows, also' brack- 
ets, a good outfit for someone that 
wants to go threshing. For par- 
ticulars write or call on me. B. J. 
Bakke. Thief River Fai's. Minn. 

FOR SALE — 7 COAA'S AND 3 
spring calves. May consider-^eam 
of young horses or car, Tandrup 
Saltvedt. Highlanding. 36-4pd 

LOST — BETAVEEN RED LAKE 
Fari's and Thief River Falls, chiids 
black silk coat on Saturday, July 
10. Finder-return to Gazette office, 
Red Lake. Fall's for reward. 

GOOD YOUNG HORSE FOR SALE 
cheap if taken at once. Inquire 
Benson Barber 'Shop. 2t 

HAY STUMPAGE : ON SEVERAL 
quarters near Goodridge for rent. 
First & Peoples State F.jnl; lio-tf 



USED CARS FOR SALE 

Buick Modal C. 25., overhauled, 
repainted and new cord tires ?700. 

Ford, late model, equipped .with 
shock absorber and Yale lock/§450. 
Marion delivery car, sacrifice price j 
$300. Empire Speedster, 5 wire 
wheel's, new tires, a sacrifice at $S00. 

Staude tractor attachment for 
Ford. Brand new, pulls two plows 
this attachment sells for $230. Our 
price for quick sa!e $130.00. 

Overland 75. Overhauled, new 
batteries and a bargain at $475.00. 
Studebaker 6, overhauled 1917 mod- 
el. Car traveled less than 600 miles 
$875. 

These cars can be seen at the E. 
C. Parsons Auto Co., Warren, Minn. 



EMPIRE FARMS CO. 

Capital $25,000 

Lands Loans City Property Insurance 

Bring your btisiness to us. 
We Promise courtesy and efficiency - 

215 Main Ave, It 

'Phone .443 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



When potatoes sold 



-for fi- 



ve or six 



dolla 



rs 



how mans bushels did you have to sell? 

Probably None! 

You had to sell at tow prices last fall because you had no 
pi'ace to stole them. This cost you more than an everlasting con- 
crete storage cellar. 

Maiyhe you can't get ears to ship your pott toes before the 
frost comes this fall. , 




«0»fM«r. ONVtate PQ1RUUO CSM0 Qg 



Build A STORAGE CELLER 
and be Independent 

We will furnish you with plans 
and material 

Prichard Lumber Co. 



Thursday and Friday 

JULY 29 and 30 . . 

LYCEUM THEATRE 

Elliott Film Corporation Presents 
DAVID W. GRIFFITH'S 

Greatest,Most Successful American Play 

THE ONE AND ONLY BIG ONE 
That Will Live and Thrive Forever 

Now in Its 

FOURTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR 
FILMDOM'S MASTERPIECE 

"THE BIRTH 
OF A NATION" 

DPIPCC Matinee 2:30 P. M. 28c and 55c 
I nlULU Evening 8:15 P. M 28c and 8k 

See once again our American Heroes 

LINCOLN, GRANT, LEE and SHERMAN 

The terror of our civil strife; The awful reconstruction 

period; The burning of Atlanta; The South before the war; 

The avengful Ku-Klux KlansI 

Enacted by "Griffith Made*' Stars 

Marsh— Walthall— Gish 

ACCOMPANIED BY BIG 

SPECIAL SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA! 



Owing to the limited number of seats, it is requested that 
children attend matinee performance. 



BALL GAME 

SUNDAY, JULY 25 FAIR GROUNDS 

Grygla vs. T. R. F. 

Game Starts Promptly at Three 
O'clock 

Be There!! 









i'"f 



VOJ.20 No. 40 



IMGEM» 

■ susapfffr 

ELSMCSTORM 



NORTHERN WOODWORK COM- 
PANY HAVE; NEW PLANT 
RUINED FROM LIGHTNING 










THIEF: RIVER FALLS, MINNESOPA, TUESDAY, JULY 27, 1920 



Chrlst_l Ingen, 25-50 Avery tractor. 
Coan, .12-25 Avery tractor. 
• Chapman, 12-25 Avery 
Fred Brnss, 10-20 Titan 
W. A. Swanson, 10-20 Titan 
Mat Hakken, 10-20 Titan 
P. A. Olson, 12-25 Avery 



i 



Lightning struck the building oc- 
cupied Jby the Northern Woodwork 
Company last evening about 11 :30, 
causing a loss .estimated in the 
neighborhood of ten thousand dollars. 
The building which ] was completed 
this spring, is strictly modern thru- 
out and is one of the fine buildings 
of the city Last spring the company 
suffered a big loss when the entire 
back end of the building fell out as 
the result of frost: forcing a large 
amount of dirt against the basement 
wall. This has only been repaired a 
short while and the; company were 
-just getting back on their feet in the 
way of operation and were getting 
ready to turn out a large amount of 
work when the lightning of last 
evening completely wiped out all 
prospects and -practically ruined the 
entire building. The roof is practical- 
_ ly all gone, nothing but charred em-' 
oers of the roof being left. The base- 
ment escaped damage other than the 
water which was thrown into the 
building by the firemen. The back 
wall, which fell out last spring, is 
aso down a s the resut of gases which 
exploded inside the building during 
the fire. The belting of the entire 
building is all destroyed which 
amounts to near $000 alone. In ad- 
dition the stock that was on the 
floor and the completed work which 
was practically ready ; for delivery is 
also a total loss and the exact amount 
is hard to figure. The- company have 
some insurnce but they are doubtful 
if they have sufficient to take care of 
the entire loss. The loss in time is 
also to be. taken into consideration 
and the company were : swamped with 
orders for work. 

The lightning; struck in the south- 
east corner of the building and the 
■electric wiring carried : it on into the 
building. The fire was! noticed short, 
ly after the lightning hit and the 
alarm wns turned in 'within a few 
minutes after the lightning struck. 
The fire company responded instant- 
ly and by their prompt action the loss 
was "hold down considerably. 
■ The company are having a hard 
run of luck and the sympathy of the 
entire city is with : them. They will 
not attempt to straighten out the 
building or start repairing until the 
insurance adjuster arrives and adjusts 
the loss. The machinery is practical- 
ly as good as ever, with the ex- 
ception of a little, water, and the dry 
kiln was also saved whch was filled 
with about fifteen thousand feet of 
high priced lumber [ . 
«' The company feel their loss rather 
keenly, but are thankful that it is 
no worse and that they have a chance 
to come back in a short time and 
again be ready to take care of the 
large volume of work they have ahead 
■of them. 



John T 

Wm. B 

tractor. 

tractor. 

tractor. 

tractor. 

tractot 

Separi tors were' sod to Hans An 
ton, Pet :p Lindobeja, T. J. Lillabold, 
W. E. C mpman and Peterson Broth- 
ers. 

The f rm state they have orders 
for seve :al other tractors and sep- 
arators Ind will without question 
make miny more • deiveries in the 
uexjt . re v weeks it At 50* possible 
for then to get the machines from 
the factt ries. 

There are several orders hanging 
fire wait ng to see what the crops do 
and froi i present indications the 
outlook i i a s good, as it could be hop- 
ed for aid there is every Indication 
of a rec< rd crop from all sources. As 
a result here is evbry asstiranee that 
there wi I be many more' separators 
and trac:ors placed within the next 
few we,!ks and that 'the (average 
farm in this and adjoining counties 
will be, equipped with 'labor saving 
machinei y and well on the road to 
bigger aid better farming. 

Peunii gton county surely is com- 
ing into her own and it is doubtful 
if there is another county in the 
state that can show the" progress for 
the year that this county has made. 
It is fas t becoming one of the big 
and prosperous sections of the state 
and thos; who have stayed by thru 
thick an 3 thin are In a fair way 
to receiv • full and just compensation 
for their faith in this section of 
Minnesot i. 



SELL LARGE 
MOUNT OF 
MACHINERY 



GUSTAFSON & SON STATE THEIR 
SALES THIS YEAR FAR 
ECLIPSE PREVIOUS YEARS 



Orgi nizing Salvation Army 

Field ■.: lanager Williams of the 
Salvation! Army has been several 
days in ' 'hief River Falls organizing 
the work of the Army for the coming 
year and under the New County Ad- 
visory B mrd plan. Under this new 
plan the full scope of the Army ac- 
tivities -a 'e outlined and recommend- 
ed by tin Advisory Board. The bud- 
get syste n lias been adopted for the 
work in Pennington county. The 
new Adv sory Board are T. P. An- 
derson, William Michelet, John Mor- 
gan, W. F. LaBree, David Gustafson, 
Theo. Qu lie; Thomas A. Way, presi- 
dent, N. (V. Tarrant, vice president, 
Will Pric hard, secretary and trens- 
mer. The board will be enlarged to 
include n embers from other parts of 
the count r. The complete- plans will 
be more fully reported as the work 
■progresse i. 



Big Band Tonite 



FINLEY'S BIG BAND AND OR- 

ORCHdSTRA APPEAR IN THIS 

CITY TONIGHT 

-'- ,' : V 



Official Paper of 'Pennington County 



Judges Named to Decide 
Winners in The Tribune's 
Automobile Campaign' 



The following representative business 
men of this city have been selected to 
make the .-final count of- votes that will 
decide the winners of-the Tribune's $3,600 
Automobile Campaigns Afair and impar- 
tial count is assured all candidates. The 
.-final count of votes wilt start promptly at 
8 o'clock next Saturday night and the win- 
. ners announced and prizes awarded as 
soon as the judges have completed the 
count. The judges are: 

Mr. Chas. Vorachek, Citizens. State Bank 
Mr. Willis Akre. First National Bank 
Mr. Scott Laird, Laird's Specialty Shop 



BOOSXERSLEAVE 

•THIS MORNING 
FORWARROAD 



FIFTY PEOPLE MAKE UP TOUR 

THAT IS OUT TO BOOST. FAIR 

AND GET ACQUAINTED 



I 



As proof of the excellent crop con- 
ditions and., general prosperity that 
is nbw evident in this section of the 
state, the sale of t.uctors, separators 
and other farm machinery in this lo- 

,-o<cality has gathered considerable mo- 
mentum and as a. result the orders 
have piled up faster than they could 
be taken care of by the local dealers.- 
C. Gustafson &Son announce that 
the sale of rarm machinery this year 
has been far in excess of other years 
and they would. have been able, to 
(dace much more, had they been able 
to get the. machinery 'from the fac- 
tories. As it is they have! sold a won^ 
derful amount of ; the standard and 
staple, articles on hand and in their 
tractor and separator, business alone 
they have piled up a- mighty good 
sales record and one that wijl be hard 
to beat by cities twice < and three 
times' the size of Thief River Falta 
They have delivered eleven tractors 
■ this .spring -.and; five separators and 
feel confident, that; they could easily 
have placed twice or three times this 
number had they been able to' secure 
the machinery from the , factories. 
The list, of those in ithis territory 
who have . purchased '■ tractors and 
separators from this firm ithis spring 

,_, follows: '.' j .. 

Hans Anton, 12-25 Avery tractor. 
_Alfred I.undgren, 10-20 Titan tract- 
or. Iver'Westby. 12-25 Avery tractor. 

■ Dr. F. N. Mead, .Tr!, 10-20 Titan tract- 
or. EUing ToUefsrud, 1 : 12-25. Avery 



Lovers )f good music will be given 
an opportunity tonight to hear the 
famous Bilties Band under the di- 
rection ofj Finley of Grand Forks 
N. D. 

The ba id is composed of fourteen 
pieces anOhey have the reputation 
of being i ne of tho good bands tour- 
ing this section of the state. They 
carry a I iltie band and orchestra 
consisting of bag pipes, vocal selec- 
tions, etc Their main attraction is 
in the pei Forniance' of "Wee Willie 
Muir," w 10 holds the championship 
of Canndi as the champion juvenile 
dancer. 

The co iipany will give a concert 
iu the au litoruin and following the 
concert wall furnish music for 
dance at the same place. It is ex- 
pected th<y will draw a good crowd 
as they lear au exceptionally! good 
reputation in this section of the state 
and have made an instant hit wher- 
ever they have appeared 

All mei ibers of the band Ihave 
been clios jn with particular care 
and as a r ;sult the band is composed 
entirely ol artists and men who can 
deliver th| goods in; any and every 
form. With such an organization it 
is certain that the band will !more 
than makA gobdT and that those" at 
tending tlte concert will receive full 
value for their money and hear some 
excellent i lusic ' 



Circus Coming 

The kidk of the city are on tip 
toes waitiig lor the first circus of 
the season that is to visitjthis city 
on Monda; ; August 9th, The show 
that is.bot ked for that date is play- 
ing-nnder: heraame of Rice; Brothers 
trained ah mai exhibition and.; the 
"company, j Ive every assurance that 
they have 'some" show and' that ev- 
eryone att indiiig. win receive . full 
value for t leir inoney and will. agree 
with them that they have -a f good; 
clean attra ition'that is' hard- to' equal. 
The compa ly have secured the ground 
just west < f the Thief Elver Iron 
Works and while this is a bit farther 
put than t ley would like, they?%ere 
compelled o take this location for 
the fact th; t there "was nothing larger^ 
closer in tie business distrl'cK . ThS 
show carriis everything in Jthe'way;- 
of trained mimals and elowps, trap- 1 
eze perforr lers and acrobatsVahd the 
kids of the city are assured of arrare 
treat on th ! day the cohvpany makes 

this. city, J ,-, u.;;..,..^.^;&;u 

/"' 



The sociability run from this city 
to Warroad Jeft an hour behind sched- 
ule this morning and despite, the 
heavy rain of, last night there were 
eleven. carsToaded to the roof all 
ready for the , tour and anxious to be 
on their way.. 

It was questionable last evening 
whether "or not the party would be 
able to make the tour owing- to the 
heavy rainfall, but optimism pre- 
vailed when the sun came out in full 
force and the day dawned bright and 
clear. The boosters were out bright 
and early and ready to make the trip. 
The tour started an hour behind 
schedule but they hope to make a 
little time- up between towns and ar- 
rive somewhere near on time at the 
end of the run. 

- Elveu cara > niade the trip and there 
were fifty people 'in the party, in- 
cluding members, of the, band. The 
band will give a concert at each stop 
and the party are sure to have a de- 
lightful trip and a good time. The 
schedule^ going and coming, is as 
fpllows: 

Thief River Falls, Rosewood, Vik- 
ing, Newfolden, Strandauist, Karl- 
stad.. Lunch at Karlstad. Greenbush 
Badger, Roseau, Salol, Warroad. 

Return Wednesday. Warroad. Ro- 
seau. Lunch at Roseau. Strathcona, 
Middle Rivor, Hoit, Thief River Falls. 

Sweet Clover Gaining '•'.- 

Woodward, Iowa. 
July, 22, 1920 
Tribune, 

Thief River. Falls, Minn. 
Dear Sirs: 

Have read with interest items in 
your paper allt through the season 
bearing on sweet clover and other 
clovers. We tried seeding sweet 
clover with oats last spring, and ap- 
parntly It -has been a failure. I am 
writing to inquire how to proceed 
to get a. fall, seeding estab, 
lished? If. we could, would like to 
get clover stand established this fall, 
so we could get a crop off it next 
year. 

Yours truy,, • 
• '..' . D. W. Wheelwright.- 

The above letter from Iowa is. very 
gratifying to ns. It shows the Trib- 
une propaganda-for better cultiva-. 
Ion and soil innoculation is being 



PAVING LOOKS 
LIKEASUREGO 
.1 AT THIS TIME 

: i - ■ 

HOWEVER OBJECTORS SAY THAT 

THEY WILL DO THEIR BEST 

TO STOP IT 



hopes to* see Pennington county the 
largest sweet: clover producing county 
inthe United States.- It can be done. 
If we can give our county" that repu- 
tation we can increase .the value "of 
all land ; and au..material wealth Itf 
the county r 100?i or "m^ore. The ; 
Tribune. has a comprehensive sweet 
clover plan fprthefuture. . Next year: 
we will begin to enlarge, upon our 
real activity In this line; The results 
in theconhty soTar are very gratify > 
tag. ~ r "'■" :.—--•--- . 



^ ■ _ „ 7- «*.«. b iiieir stunning tue state over, wnicn 

:noticed by practical men. -We are InJ smdeks of good logic and" may prove 
nones to* Ree PAnnini»fnn onrnh, *-w« .._ . • : .... , . .. . ■- 



The paving situation in this city 
remains about the same. Those- in 
favor of paving saying that the act- 
ual, work on paving wiU start soon 
ind those opposed to paving stating 
that the city will not be allowed to 
pave., Just "what the outcome is to 
be will be determined in the course 
of a few days! and as soon as the 
contractor arrives on the job the final 
showdown in the entire matter will 
be under way and this city will either 
have paying mighty soon or it will 
not. 

City officials state that they are 
waiting for the appearance of the 
contractor and that as soon as he 
arrives and funnishes his bond the 
work of paving will be under way. 
The contractor with his equipment is 
expected to arrive any day and when 
he does arrive it will then be the 
grand opening that anti-pavers have 
been waiting for and if they have 
anything up their sleeve to v sprlng 
it is expected the hair will start fly- 
ing as soon as the workmen start on 
the streets. . 

Some question exists as to whether 
or not the trust companies will carry 
out their end of the contract in fur- 
nishing the money for this work, but 
city officials believe that as soon as 
they see the city is determined to pave 
and has actually, started . upon the 
work, that the bonding companies will 
come thru with the money and that 
the entire matter will be straightened 
oiit in short ordei;. 

There are those who maintain that 
the bonding company will, not act in 
the matter as lon^ as the affair is 
hanging fire in the courts, basing 
their presumption that this will afford 
tlie trust companies an etsy way to 
get out of filling their end of the 
contract: and with the scarcity and 
high price of money, they believe 
that the trust companies are looking 
for an opportunity to get loose from 
their end of the contract. There are 
others who maintain that as soon as 
the trust companies see that the! city 
js determined to: pave and that" the 
work is under way that ^hey will 
live up to their end of the agreement 
as they are too big a concern to fall 
down on this contract and injure 
their standing the state over. Which 



once more - ' between neighbors and 
friends. 

The Tribune takes th? stand that 
tue city needs paving and needs it 
bad.y and would like mightily to sec 
t'ie city pave. We are heartily in 
l*'°* °f th , e I"> vi "S Program of the 
^■^'^"Uladly welcome the dav 
«lieii the first block of paving is laid 
on the streets of Thief River Falls! 

M ;;" d ™ rs - -Bottelson Entertain 

lv 1 f ? ^ ra - A ' Botf e.'son pleasant- 
ly entertained a number of their 
friends last Saturday evening at 

the ^affair were: Mr. and Mrs. A. G 
trabnelson. Mr. and Mrs T P An' 
dersou, Mrs. Jung, Mrs. H.EBot 
te!con and Miss Eva Orrock 



Raises Large Spuds 

Phil Amon, of this city, so far 
hods the record for the "growth of 
innr? potatoes. Last week he un- 
earthed one potato- which tipped the 
beams at one pound even weight. 
J™ ls what 's commonlv termed 
some potato" and so far' there have 
been none to come forward with a 
larger specimen of the tuber familv 
Mr. Anion states that in his opinion 
the potato yield this year is sure to 
be above the average and he looks 
for a mighty fine yield and much 
lower prices in the potato market 
Most of u s can stand a decline in the 
potato- market without anv serious 
inconvenience, especially as long as 
they continue to sell at ten and 
twelve^ cents per poiiud. 



Seven O'clock Dinner 

Miss Mary Prichard informallv en 
tertained at a three course dinner Fri. 
day evening. Covers "were laid for six. 

Working Up a Reputation 

Municipal Judge N.-W. Tarrant is 
working up quite a reputation as a 
"marrying justice" and his neighbors 
are not at all surprised to see him 
hikuig down town at any and all 
hours to perforin the ceremony that 
binds them tight. He lias a record 
hard to equal in this line and his 
ability to tie them so tight they can- 
not even think- of getting loose has 
gained such a standing wjth those 
matrimonially inclined that they 
come for miles to have the knot done 
up to perfection' and the non-skid 
clause attached with all the majesty 
and pomp that .tlie Judge knows and 
uses best. His reputation has long 
ago extended to other states and it 
is a common thing for tourists to 
stop over in this city and enquire for 
his services Such is the reward for 
being efficient and on the job. 



FAIR PROSPECTS 
LOOM UP BIG 
INATTRACTIONS 



HORSE RACING ADDED TO PRO- 
GRAM—AUTO RACES CAN- 
CELLED SATURDAY 



Win from Grygla 



LOCAL TEAM EASILY DEFEATS 

GRYGLA TEAM IN GAME 

SUNDAY 



The?ball game Sunday between 
this city and Grygla proved to be 
another winner for the locals with 
the final score of two and three in 
favor of Thief River Falls. The lo- 
cal team played mighty good ball 
and could have played a lot better 
had it been necessary, Grygla did 
all in her power to come up to the 
scratch but were outclassed from the 
start and had not a chance thru the 
entire game. 

The ball playing of the local team 
is mighty fine and they are picking 
them off as fast as" they come up and 
with an ease that would do a team 
of professionals great credit. The 
local team composed entirely of home 
men, is fast becoming one of the 
strong teams of this section and 
from their record during tlie season 
it can be seen that they have 'mighty 
good.material and could easily de- 
velop into one of the fastest amateur 
teams in northern Minnesota if they 
decided to go into ball playing ex- 
clusively and put the required time 
in at practice. i 

The series of games to be' played 
at the fair next. week' are sure to be 
a big drawing card and it, is believed 
that the locals will without question 
come off the winners. Those who 
have seen them in action during the 
season feel that there is little doubt 
a s to the outcome during the tourna- 
ment and everything points to an 
easy victory for the locals. . 



The Pennington County Fair will 
open in all its glory and pomp just 
one week from today and a s the 
date approaches indications for a 
bigger and better fair than ever be- 
fore become more bright and assured. 
The fair board have, secured every- 
thing that is considered necessary 
for a good fair this year and with' 
the exhibits of the local people, it is 
hoped the fair. thi s year will attract 
the largest attendance in the history' 
of the society. Amusements for old 
and young have been secured and 
this is considered mighty important 
by the fair board, in fact it is •bu- 
sidered so important that I hey have 
expended twice the money of past 
years in order to bring the standard 
up to, what it should be and what the 
people of this section have been led 
to expect. 

It w:ls Jhoughjt last week that 
automobile races were to be secured 
for the lastday of the fair but thru 
some misunderstanding, this feature 
has been cancelled and it is not to be 
given at the fair as announced. The 
management have secured horse rac- 
ing instead ' and 'some very good 
races are expected to lie pulled oft for 
the approval of tlie public and it is 
hoped that the races will bear' out 
the reputation given them and prove 
to be a s good as hoped for. The full 
details of this feature will be given 
out in due time, and a complete pro- 
gram of the racing events furnished. 
The fair management havt-'nnt fully 
determined as to what days this at- 
traction is to appear, hut will know 
in the course of a few days 

The ladies of the county are work- 
ing hard and diligently for the'biggest' 
exhibit in the. history of the society 
and they have given assurance of the 
largest and) most interesting exhibit 
that has so far been given a; the local 
ew of the fact that the 
to be used this year 
hiliifs and 
ides left on exhibit will 
care than in foniUM* 
will be guarded against 
the ladies of the conn- 
free to bring in their 
as a- result something 
the ornlnary is assured, 
•pants of the c-ity arranged 
ion of booths in the audi,, 
the days -of the fair and 
have also written their wholesale 
houses to have demonstrators on the 
job for the days of the fair demon- 
strating thei various lines handled and 
in this way Wiping boost ihe interest 
in this department besides giving the 
local merchants a lift In the way of 
putting theij- goods before' the public. 
Teople from all .-cottons' of the 
county and | adjoining r-ounries have 
expressed themselves as looking for- 
ward to a mighty good fair and the 
attendance is sure to be good as a 
result. 



fair. In v 
Auditorium 
for the disilluy of these 
that the ar 
receive bcijcr 
years and 
rain' and du 
ty feel mote 
exhibits an 
better than 
Tlie more 
for the eree 
torjum for 



ELECTROLIERS 
FOR LABREE 
ARE ORDERED 



CITY ELECTRICIANS STATE THEY 

WILL BE INSTALLED IN 

A FEW WEEKS 



. Epworth League Social . : 

^.';^$;^pwoj^'l^|^';^''.'tlie.'M.i'B. 

at fti&jg-' C. ',N6jpe£'farm this evening. 
tQpMprhnces '#llj ' Be ' it"the church 
forjall whojwlsB/to, go out. A jolly 
good Hme Is^sufed-all;' Each one 
;is"ask^,t^»biingja^tln;cnpi ^?- - a:-- 



'to be right. In any event the boost 
era for paving are going to give ; the 
objectors an opportunity to use ev- 
■erythiirg they have in the) way of 
opposing.the program of the city and 
the objectors are equally as. deter- 
mined to use everything theycan to 
block-' the program, which portends 
to '.a? lively scrap and the. ultimate de- 
feat of one side or the other, '■'•' 

The matter as it actually -stands 
today is just about as' it was. .'The 
objectors maintaining the city cannot 
pave and that -they will take" steps 
to -prevent it from 'paving and the 
city claiming 'that It cSri' pave and 
that it is gong t?. pave if it is possible 
to do so and nothing interferes with 
their :program. A few days at the 
most should, decide, this ; issue and the 



Pentecostal Mission 

Service will be held as follows in 
the Pentecostal Mission on. Third 
street under Lambert's drug store: 
In English Sunday evening and Fri- 
day evening at 8 p. m. In Scandi- 
navian Sunday at 3 p. m. and Tues- 
day's at 8 p. m. Evangelist O. Olsen 
will preach. All welcome. 



public again.be given the assurance .Monday a. 



. -rf ... - .",..'.-v-- -: o: ■!■--- -.i«v..'.. .- ^v-. --?, ,.t ■ -.,-- 

r>» •.--.viiV^-" -v'jT-ji -'TT.vrjV.S'.k.j: rf ei.'.''*. •:.*«. aLi-i'-V*. 1 '. t ■.■.*-- " ; 



that allris welfcarid peace shall reign 



Candidate Cox defeated four cab- 
inet officials, . several democratic 
senators, hundreds of federal offici- 
ahd the secret but none the less - 
erful influence of the White 
Yet President Wilson 
.pleased. . 

George.-Haynr 
is visiting at t x - 
F. Haynes, c 
returns, to i 
trip to the 

Mr. and 



LaBree avenue is soon to be all 
dolied.up in a new dress iu the ' 
of electroliers. The city has . 
the posts and the globes f 
avenue and they expect th 
rive in the course, of a few 
active work "on the ins' • 
begin as soon as they 

The new lights are 
block only, bet- 
streets .with fr 
of the Street.; 
single- and ' 
five lights 
awa A wit' 
used. 7 
most p' 
great 
the f 
in 
i 



sojtfrh at 



*'_' i.[ 




DEFECTIVE PAGE 



S. 



■y 



.,~.^.***>M,.-w^^ n .. {mjT]r JirrmnnrwiTn in iiMi r ii 



^•j-.'4iTn=pKnp 



:&v&3&tft 



Page Two 



Local Ner 



Misses Dorothy Bottieson, Florence 
Aalberg and Sir. H. LIndberg re- 
turned to this city- Tuesday from De- 
troit where tuejvhnd been spending 
a few days at the Cronkhite cottage. 
3Iiss Anna Taneni, who is a mem- 
ber of the graduating class of '16, is 
spending a three weeks vacation at 
her home in this city. Miss Tanem 
is a member of the nursing corps at 
the Northwestern Hospital in Minne- 
apolis. 

L. L. Xaas, of Lancaster, was a 
business visitor in this city Tuesday. 
Mrs. H. K. Bottea'son, of Interna- 
tional Fallsi arrived Tuesday to spend 
two weeks visiting at the A. Bot- 
teisbn home. 

Mrs. J. K. Bloomquist and Miss 
Anna AspeUmd, of this city, left 
for Minneapolis Tuesday evening, 
where they will visit friends for an' 
indefinite period. 

Miss Ruby Halvorson, of Minne 
apoiis, arrived in tliis. city Tuesday 
evening, where she will visit for an 
indefinite period with friends and 
relatives. 

Miss Edith Langseth, of Warren, 
was; in this city Tuesday visiting with 
friends. 

Milton Lund returned front Minne. 
apolis Tuesday evening where he had 
visited with friends over Sunday. 

Misses Avis Akre, Lncile Burns, 
and Ruth Brown of this city, and 
Miss Olive Booren, of Stillwater, will 
leave Friday morning for Detroit, 
where they will enjoy a ton days out- 
ing at Slioreham. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Aarneson and 
children left Wednesday afternoon 
for Portland, Oregon, where they will 
make their future home. 

Mrs. L. LaCourse returned to her 
home in St. Paul Wednesday, after 
spending a short time visiting with 
friends and re'/atives here. 

Mrs. O. Sherya, of St. Hilaire, re- 
turned to her home at that place, 
after visiting for the past week at 
the M. Johnson home. 

Mr. and Mrs.- I. G. Sands and 
family left for Redded, S. D., Wed- 
nesday afternoon wlierc they will 
make their future home. 

Miss Helen Strand left Wednesday 
afternoon for Union Lake where she 
wiil be the guest of Miss Agnes 
Holtcti for one week. 

Mrs. Oscar Hagund, of Cannon 
FaHs. is visiting at tile home of her 
brother. Dr. A. W. Swedenburg. 

Mrs. Leonard Peterson, who has 
.been visiting in Crookston returned 
to this city Wednesday, morning. ' 

Mrs. Homer Muzzey, who has spent 
the past week visiting with her 
mother. Mrs. W. Raiser, of Bed Lake 
Kill's. ' - 

Misses Lottie Austin, and Margaret 
and Josephine ICichhnmmer, of this 
city, were among those who attended 
tiie fair in Grand Forks Tuesday. 
Miss Ausrin returned on the excursion 
train but (he Misses Eielihammer 
will remain there for a week and visit 
with friends mid relatives. 

Mi's. Quirk, of Hazel, was in this 
srity on Wednesday attending to busi. 
ness and consulting physicians.., 

Mr. ynd Mrs. E. Evenson and Mr. 
and Mrs. Perkins left via auto lor 
Minneapolis and various points in 
Wisconsin. They wii'l be gone about 
three weeks. ' 

Mrs. E. Saridstrom and sons mo- 
tored to Baudette where they will 
spend a week or ten days visiting 
n-ith friends and relatives. ■ 

Miss Alice Wilson, who is a meni- 
- lier of the nursing corps in the Abbot 
hospital in Minneapolis> is spending 
lier vacation at the home of her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. C. M... Wilson. 

J. W. Denhart and children, of 
Hazel, were visitors in this city on 
Wednesday. 

Miss Eiodie Paulson returned Wed- 
nesday from. Warren where she has 
been receiving medical treatment. 

J. P. Ferdinan'dson, of Goodridge, 
was a business visitor in this city on 
' Wednesday. 

Mrs. H. Gery. of/ Roseau, who has 
been visitins_.with friends and rela- 
tives in Park River, N. D., arrived 
in this city Wednesday evening for 
a few days visit at; the Axei Risberg 
nome. 

Mrs. T. M. Brevig. of St. Hilaire, 
i ted with friends in this city be- 
- 1 \rains on Wednesday. 

vand Alpha Skogerbbe, of 

rrived Wednesday evening 

. few days in this city as 

of Miss iBeatrice Snndum. 

-a. Beruholt and child- 

vec. N. D., spent a few 

'-'ting with Mrs. 



uison, Marie 

ud Messrs, 

are week- 

J. M. 

Maple 



dalil homo. 



pp£5j«jgi$*3|p3ip>^ 



*&Jp.F?stft?: 



THE TRIBUNE 



TUESDAY, JULY 27. *92° 




Holt Tu *day morning after spend- 
ing a f e v days in this city .visiting 
with frii nds and relatives. 

Mrs . ( '. L. Cronstrom accompanied 
by Mrs. M. Cronstrom, i'eft Thursday 
morning for Holt where they will 
visit for a few days with friends. . 

Miss Helen Hall, of- Minneapolis, 
visited 1 etween trains with her 
cousin, iliss Ei%ie Graniim, of this 
city enr >up!r to Middle River where 
she exp< cts to visit indefinitely with 
friends ind relatives. 

Miss leneva Compton, of Green- 
bush sp( ut Wednesday and Thursday 
11 this :ity shopping and visiting 
I'ith fri nds. 

Mrs. 3. Hanson, of St. Cloud, ar- 
rived in this City Friday evening to 
visit indefinitely at the John Ofte- 



Mrs. D. Bar'ett and daughters, 
Dorothy and Ruth, who have been 
vsiting for tiie past week with friends 
and relatives in Rhine'.ander, Wis., 
returned! to this city Friday evening. 

Mrs. John Bergstrom and children 
who have been visiting for the past 
two wciks at the L. W. Manther 
home ill this city, .returned to their 
home inJFedernl Dam Saturday morn- 
ing. I 

Miss [Doris Riehter, . of this city, 
who has! spent the past week visiting 
with friends in Vergas, returned to 
her honie Friday evening. 

George Johnson left- Saturday 
morning for Warren where he will 
visit w(th friends and relatives for 
an indef nite period. 

Mr. Snd Mrs. O. F. Mellby and 
famly ( ccompanied by Miss Gladys 
Grindeldnd, of Warren, left Friday 
morning* for Detroit, where they will 
spend t m days vacation at the lakes. 
Thev m ide the trip by car. 

Dr. J :ilan of this city, left Thurs- 
day for* Grand Forks where he will 
attend :he fair. 

Miss Ida Oftedahl, who has been 
visiting in this city, returned to her 
home ir Holt Friday. Miss Oftedahl 
has bee n employed in Michigan, N. 
D., and while in this city she. was 
a guest at the Hendrickson home. 

Miss Agnes Abiahamson.left Fri- 
day afternoon Mr Fargo where she 
will visit her sister, 



John .. Mikulecky left Saturday 
morning for BemidjL While in that 
city he will be a guest of , his son, 
Frank: 

G. Halvorson returned Friday from 
St. Cloud : where lie ha s been attend- 
ing to business. 

H. E. Holt and family and L. B. 
George' and family motored to Grand 
Forks Saturday where they attended 
the fair being he'.d there. 

Miss Gertrude Bergquist, of Park- 
ers Prairie, returned to her home' 
Friday evening after spending the 
past week as n guest at the Betsy 
Miller home. 

George Mostue motored to Grand 
Forks Saturday to attend' the last 
day of the fair. _ 

Miss Kathryn Price, of Bemidji, 
visited with friends and relatives in 
this city on Saturday. 

Miss Nettie Batten was among tbe 
out of town shoppers. in thi s city on 
Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Arnquist and 
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Arnquist, of New 
Richmond, Wis., spent Saturday in 
this city enroute to Winnipeg. They 
were making' the trip by car. 

Miss Mabel Wold, of Badger, ar- 
rived in this city Friday- afternoon, 
where she will visit with friends and 
relatives for a few days. 

Mrs. V. G. Moody and Mrs. H. M. 
Spjut. of Stratheona, spent two days 
in this city ast week shopping and 
visiting with friends. - 1 

"LUNATIC" CHINKS 



NEW LARGE-YIELDING 

RYES FOR MINNESOTA 



About 20.000 bushels of : certified 
Rosen rye and 10,000 busheis of cer- 
tified Minnesota No. 2 rye will bej 
available for the farmers of Minne- j 
sola this. fail. These^two varieties ( 
have proved far superior to ordinary 
winter ryes.' The Rosen rye is es- 
pecially adapted to southern Minne- 
sota and to localities where winter 
conditions are not extreme. Minne- 
sota No. 2 is especially useful where 
winters are severe. 

The Minnesota Crop Improvement 
association will soon have & seed 
list leady giving the names of growers 
from whom seed can be obtained. 
Farmers interested should address 
T. E. Odi'and, secretary, Minnesota 
Crop Improvement "association; Uni- 
versity Farm, St. Paul. 



Mrs. W. 



Collins, for an indefinite period 
Mr. f nd Mrs. Ben Erickson, of thi s 
ity lef ; Friday afternoon for Grand 
Forks $-here they will attend 
fair. 

Mr. (ind Mrs. E. 



to their home in 



after a 

Larson 

Miss 

Friday 



period 
Knutso 1 

Miss 
resume 



the 



Larson re.truned 
.Kenmare, N.. D., 



two weeks visit at the L. G. 

home; 

Anna Strand, of this city, left 

afternoon for Grand Forks. 



where she will visit for an indefinite 
with her cousin, Mrs. A. E. 



Amy Gunderson -returned to 
her duties at the St. Luke 
hospital, in. Fargo, after spending 
her vacation on her fathers farm 
near tins city. 

Miss] Ruth Dybvik returned to her 
home m this city Friday afternoon, 
after spending ten days in Baudette 
as the [guest of her brother Harry. 

Roscoe Bakke. Ernest Barzen and 
Lelandlscliuster left Friday for Grand 
Forks where they will visit for a few 
d» ys a id also attend the fair. 

Miss ;s Ella anl Clara Anderson ar- 
rived i 1 this city Saturday from 
Moorhi ad, where they have been at- 
tending summer session of the nor- 
mal. They will visit in this city 
with f lends before leaving for their 



home in Jclle. 

Missies Hu'.da Fossum and Betsy 
Legvol I returned to their respective 
homes in this city Saturday frotn 
Moorhl ad where they have been at- 
tendinj ; summer school. 

Misl Amy Syverson left Friday for 
Bemid, i where she will visit for an 
indefinite period with her cousin, 
Miss ^ i«'.et Mikulecky. 



. and 

have 

le 



SI7HoraceAve. N.. 



-'Phone 15 



Hall Brothers Co. 

Hardware—Farm Machinery 



jgfcr 
"mutts 




V Good Place to Trade" 

ief River Falls, Minn, 



f The Bight Lunatic Chinks, a New 
York Hippodrome act, will be a 
big vaudeville feature of the Min- 
nesota State Fair, Twin Cities, 
Sept 4 to 11. 



1,000 BOYS AND GIRLS 

IN STATE PIG CONTESTS 




, More than 1.000 Minnesota boys 
and girl's are sole owners either of 
a single pig or a sow and litter and 
are preparing to exhibit their stock 
in the state pig contests this year, 
according to a report made by L. H. 
Fudge, University Farm, in charge 
of pig t-Vub work in this state. More 
than 500 purebred pigs are being 
raised by club members in the single 
pig project, and 476 purebred sows 
have been placed in the hands of 
boys and girls. 

Wait!-- Don't Operate! 

Take Sto-li-gal, a doctor's prescrip- 
tion for dissolving gall stones, and 
complicated sotmach ailments. 

One box gives instant relief in all 
cases of GALL STONES, liver and 
stomach trouble, such as indigestion, 
dyspepsia, chronic appendicitis, gas, 
sour stomach,, ulcers, catarrh, pains 
in stomach and back, constipating, 
etc. Don't wait but get a box of 
Sto-li-gal from your druggist today. 
Price $1. Attention! No fake tes- 
timonials, but positive facts. Sto-li- 
gal has helped thousands of people 
and if will positively give you' relief 
in all ailments mentioned regardless 
of your age or duration of trouble. 
Write for free literature to Dept. F. 
Digestive Chemical Company, St. 
Paul, Minn; Sold in Thief River 
Falls, by Dr. H. B. Newell, Lambert's 
Pharmacy, also leading druggists 
everywhere. 




The TITAN 10-20 Tractor 

For steady power to run your 
small grain separator—and re- 
liable power at all times. 

We will have'another shipment of these trac- 
tors in a few days. Also several carloads of 
new Racine small separators. The most of 
these are sold however and if you are ready 
to figure on a good dependable outfit give us a 
chance to prove to you the qualities and ad- 
vantages in these machines— NOW! 



C. Gustaf son & Son 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 

Branch at Grygla, Minnesota 



Win. J. BROWN 

Lawyer 

Formerly County Attorney 

Marshall County 

Office Over First National 3ank 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



THEO QUALE 

Lawyer 

Practice in all Courts and Bf» 

fore U. S. Land Cjfiice 

McGinn) Building 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 



HOOT MON! 

Tbe Kilties Are Coming! 

(Fourteen Pieces; Every Member an Artist) 



FINLEY'S 

Kiltie Band and Orchestra Will Give a Concert and 

Dance at 

Thief River Falls 

AUDITORIUM . 

TUESDAY, JULY 27 

Concert Band, Bag Pipes, Vocal Selec- 
tions and WEE WILLIE MUIR cham- 
pion Juvenile Dancer of Canada 



Concert at 8 O'clock 



Adults 55c, Children 25c 



Big Dance after the Concert. Music by the Kiltie 
7 piece Orchestra. 

DANCE £1.25 



Dotft Miss This Treat 




.iifeJX-^^-!?Vr^ : '/~"-i :,;«.V.; -.. .,-..•;.. j 






TBESDAYJ JULY a?, i^jj ' ' 



mm 




STILLLIVEON? 



them 
tne 



h >rn 



Jc 



OUTLAW WORST BEAST OF ANY 

PERSON KNOWN TO THE 

ENTIRE WORLD 



\t" 



— v 



(By Sidney M. Sutherland) 
General Joaquin Amaro's Head 
quarters, Concho,; Chihuahua, June, 
24. — This, then is the foreign lay- 
man's fragmentary indictment of 
Francisco Villa,: super-bandit and 
murderer of parts. It sets forth 
adequately and with scant use of 
adjectives a series of crimes I would 
decline to attribute to any human be- 
ing if incontrovertible proof had not 
been furnished me since my arrival 
fiom the north. 

Also this faulty arrangement re- 
lates ony a few of the major atroci- 
ties which for seven years have hyp 
notized with horror the northern half 
of a nation bordering the- United 
States and its civilization. It does 
hot molest the reader wth retail as- 
sassinations and petty misdeeds. 

Just a Few Pages- 

Here are two or three choice sel- 
ections from St. Peter's blotters: ' 

Temochi^ northwest of Slinaca, in 
the western part of this state, is — 
was — a village of some 300 humbly 
. contented farming folk. In a neigh- 
boring hamlet a youth from Temochi 
stabbed and killed one of Villa's 
band in a quarrel over a horse. Villa 
rowed that Temochi should become 
a memory only. * 

Entering the town at dawn, Villa 
had the hundred male citizens, hand- 
cuffed with ropes to the bars of the 
windows facing the only street. More 
than 130 women were then paraded 
before the avenger. He chose three 
young girls, sent them into a house 
and with a wave of his hand turned 
the others over to his COO eager eyed 
and wet lipped followers. 



At 



He 
sioze 
the 



N I -v" "•*: 



up and down the street from 
of his saddle.; ... ^. ;.:,_ 



Villa's Sardonic ; Humor 




Santa. Dosalia de Camargo, an 
Impoi ant mining and ^railroad town 
snrroi nded by an . exceedingly, rich 
farm! |g community, Villa's ghastly 
humor took a sardonic twist; Sum- 
moniig every family with 'un-bap- 



...... children to the plaza, he har- 

ranfig led Jia thousand : or so citizens 
for ai hour, recounting his valorous 
deeds and wound up by "declaring 
he wmted to become the ' godfather 
of eviry Unbaptized infant present. 
There were about eighty such chil- 
dren. .' 

Villi sent for the priest, • forced 
him tA baptize the babies and name 
each <ne Pancho Villa,' and then 
stood ip to receive the kisses of tho 
terrorised nothers, permitting the 
fathen to kiss his handj 

Shen ordered his soldiers to 
fifty of the younger women in 
plaza and shot the priest— to 
prevent Sis invalidating the spirit- 
ual legality of the baptismal cere- 
mony, a 8 heexplained to those- stand- 
ing ne ir. The next morning he com- 
pelled the brothers and fathers of 
the w< men to take them home and 
return to become members of his 
forces. That afternoon nearly a 
hundrel mothers and sisters of the 
draftee citizens went to the barracks 
to ask their release. Villa - ordered 
several volleys fired into, the hudded 
throng and then had his cavarly 
charge those still standing. These 
were c it down with machetes. 

Pausfe and ponder, and then multl- 
ply by ten all the brutalities you ever 
knew < f, and you. can not reach the 
sum of his beastiaiities- — multiply by 
a millim.tha infinite variety of his 
maniac leal outburst*— do thi s and 
you wip just begin to approach .with- 



in hail: ng distance of the record of 
Francis :o Villa.. 



THIEF 



LAKE BED 
Pfe0D,UCIN(j BUMPER CROPS 



HUNDREDS OF ACRES OF FINEST 

LOOKING GRAIN TO BE SEEN 

IN COUNTY 



Panorama of Rapine 

When he emergeVl from the house 
at noon he laughed loud and long at 
the panorama of rapine and horror 
the street presented. The men tied 
to the -windows could only shut tneir 
yes. Angered- by tlioir mute recep- 
tion of the spectacle, Villa took his 
bowie knife and cut off the eyelids 
of every one of the men. .Many of 
their eyes lie gouged out and left 
hanging on their cheeks'. 

The stricken women were then 
picked up from the streets where they. 
lay, dragged to the sidewalk opposite 
the fly fluttered eyesnekets of then 
relatives, ad then and there chopped 
slowly to pieces with machetes. The 
men were then shot and left suspend- 
ed from th ewindows. Of the seventy 
or so children that remained of the 
population, Villa had the boys mut- 
ilated and the girls — ''We' .will be' 
back some other day." the rebel chief 
,-^said. He then reentered the house 
-. himself and shot the three girls, and 
with the bandits rode gaily away in- 
to the mountains. Neighboring towns, 
adopted the children, after burying 
the dead, and returned to their pray, 
ing for deliverance from the monster. 

The Horror at San Andres 

Returning from Juarez in June 
. lastf. year, Villa swooped down on the 
town of San Andres, half way be- 
tween Chichunhua and Hearzon. It 
seems that the; poor city fathers there 
had adopted resolutions condemning 
a raid perpetrated by the outlaw on 
a neighboring towji. Despite the pro- 
tests of Oeneral Felipe Angeles, Vil- 
la hanged nearly 200 men to tele- 
giaph poles. There were thirty-three 
poles to the mile. He hung two to 
each pole on either'side of the track 
for nearly a mile and a half. As they 
swung there strangling Villa slashed 
their naked bodies in unspeakable 
fashion: ~ ' ; ; . 

Of 200 women, ranging in age from 
10 to SO, which the town contained, 
he gave his four hundred men, one 
for every pair of bandits. 

"T* Surrender Their Women 

The minotaur demanded one maid- 
en as a sacrifice every year. Pancho 
Villa has «p terrified the little towns 
.and anches of Chihuahua that he 
merely sends word ahead that he is 
coming and will be ( in a certain town 
on a certain day| and the tender fem- 
inine sacrifice is prepared. Thus in 
Punta del Agua 1 , a tiny village in 
the heart of the Palomas mountain 
range, southwest of iOjinaga, so cal- 
loused have the poqr farmers become 
to these demands that 'on the occa- 
sion in question the men went out to 
meet Villa, carrying food, water, mel. 
ons and grapes. 

ViKa' appetite satisfied, these men 
waited patiently by the roadside 
while the outlaw and his followers 
entered the town now occupied only 
by the women. Hours later one of 
the men went into " the village and 
hat in hand asked permission of the 
satiated brigands ■ to return to their 
despoiled homes. 
■ ■> Such submission often wins Villa's 
indulgence and in this case he con- 
tented himself with assassinating the 
mayor and his secretary by dragging 



The 
friends 
side of 
evening 
crops of 
and others 
certnin'rj 
ning am ! 
heaviest 
of the 
500 acre 
400. 
acres of 
caused 
Forder 
twenty 



11 r 



* O ll 



Ford'er's fields from' one end o ;the 
other andhe .'certalnly-has the finest 
prpspeotjror a, big yield we ever saw 
His j sSring"rye "tieafry ready ^'io ctit 
tands five feet or more high and as 
thick as it can grow with well filled 
out heads. And the wheat Is Just 
about.as tall,', thick and well filled 
dut. Wheat heads came clear above 
our Maxweir car box, and stands' so 
thick on the ground that one can 
see no further into it than he foui'd 
into a brick wa'fi. He also has a 
large field of flax that Is a wonder. 
Sown on the' 28th of May, the flax 
is two and a half feet high and well' 
advanced toward maturity. He has 
oats that-from.all indications should 
turn out 100 bushels per acre, being 
as thick as it can stand with tali' 
straw and large heads. A large part 
of his oats was lodged by the storm 
a week ago last Sunday but it partly 
raised again end he hopes to be able 
to cut and save all the crop. The 
productiveness of the lake bed soil is 
further demonstrated by Mr. Forder's 
garden which shows a growth far in 
excess of anything we have seen 
elsewhere. He sowel'a small plot of 
alfalfa as an experiment . oh May 
12th, and it is now 12 inches high 
and growing rapidly. Timothy sown 
the same day is even taller and head, 
ed put. The rich black sediment soil 
of the rake bed will. never wear out 
as it is. ten feet or more in depth. 
It stands drouth or excessive rains 
equaly well. The lake bed proper 
together with the Moose Eiver bot- 
tom comprising about 25,00 acres, 
wi'fl, under an efilclent drainage sys- 
tem and thororugh development prove 
to be a veritable "Valley of the Nile" 
one of the richest valleys in the state 
and in fact and in truth a garden spot 
of the wprid. — Middle River Pioneer. 



NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 



iter in company with some 
nade a trip out to the south 
he Thief Lake bed Tuesday 
looking over the lake bed 
John Henning, Milton Fordei 
ts. The growing crops were 
an eye opener. John Hen- 
Milton Forder are the two 
farmers on the south side 
ake. Mr. Henning put in 
s and Mr. Forder a little over 
Henning lost about 200 
his farm from the overflow 
the big rain June 8. Mr. 
ly sustained a loss of about 
1 ces. We passed thru Mr. | 



Seaied proposals will be received 
at the oflice of the County Auditor 
•of Pennington. County, Minnesota, 
nntil 2 o'clock P. M. Aug. 3rd, 1920, 
for the construction of Jobs number 
20:05, 20:06 and 20:07 consisting 
of the following: 

Job No. 20:04 
located on State road No. 4 near the 
SE corner of Section 36 Town of 
Sanders, involving the construction of 

One W 04 Standard concrete Box 
Culvert 24 ft. long, involving ■ 

Ee-enforciug steel 1333 ibs. 

Class "A" concrete 22.9 cubic 
yards. 

2 in. pipe raining 100 lbs. , 
Job No. 20:05 
located on State road No. 4 near the 
SE corner of Section 36, Town of 
Smii'ey consisting of the construction 
of 

One Wi06 Standard concrete Box 
Culvert 24 ft. long, involving 

Ke-enforcing steel 2693 ibs. 

Class "A" concrete 4594 cubic 
yards 

2 inch pipe railing 260 lbs. 
Job No. 20:06 
.'ocated on State road No. 3 on line 
between Sections 27 and 34, Town 



P^nmeiaal, •■; consisting of the •con- 
atruetion ipf - ,1.'.. ... ■. . .. 

^One W104 Standard concrete Box 
Culvert 24 ft.. long, involving 
He-enforcing steel 2291.2 lbs.. 

Class "A" concrete 37.78 cubic 
yards 

2 in pipe railing 260 lbs. 
Job No. 20:07 

located on line between .Sections 29 
and 32, Town of Numedal, on State 
road No. 3, consisting of the con- 
struction of 

One W 84 Standard concrete Box 
Culvert, involving 

Re-enforcing steel 1760.8 lbs. 

Class "A" concrete^ 28.96 cubic 
yards 

2 in pipe railiag 115 lbs. 

Plans' and specifications may be 
examined at the office of the County 
Auditor at Thief River Falls, Min- 
nesota, or at the oflice of the State 
Highway Department, 920 Guardian 
Life Bldg., St. Paul, Minnesota 
Blue print plans may be obtained 
from the State Highway Department 
at bidders expense. ■ The right "is 
reserved to reject any or all bids and 
to waive any defects. Bids must 
be accompanied by a certified cheek, 
payable to the County Treasurer, 
for at least 0% of thte amount of 
the proposal. . 

County Auditor 

Pennington County. 
July 20-27 A 3 




Farmers' 
Checking 
' Accounts 



-THIEF RIVER FALLS PLEASED 

BY QUICK RESULTS 



Everyone is pleased with the quick 
results of simple witchhazel, cam- 
phor, hydrastis, etc., as mixed in La- 
vbptik. eye wash. One man's eyes 
were so badly strained he could not 
read without pain. Two applications 
relieved him. A lady with weak, in- 
flamed eyes was greatly helped by 
ONE bottle. We guarantee a small 
bottle. of Lavoptik td help ANY CASE 
of weak, strained or inflamed eyes. 
F. J. Stebbins, druggist. 



A CHECKING account is a 
■'"■business necessity to every 
farmer. It provides a complete 
record of income from crops,' live- . 
stock and other sources'. Every 
check drawn against these funds 
is a legal receipt. 

TN harvest, feeding, planting 
* season— all the year 'round, 
the "checkbook" way is the con- 
venient way of handling farm 
finances. 



Citizens State Bank 




for Highest Possible Quality 
! at Lowest Possible Price 





ais^iS^s^ 



i i&M&&<!&M»&ZM£&m 



SURE, WE'RE GOING! 

You 11 call- them the finest exhibits in 
the world when you see them at the 

Minnesota State Fair 

September 4 to 11 



TiiefRiverOrifeShop 

The home of PENNSLYVANIA TIRES* 

Expert Vulcanizing and Tire Repairing 

Tire Accessories '.'**" 



W. A. CLAY, PROPRIETOR 

3IJ Main Ave. North 



After smoking your first Spur, you might 
say "just right," "immense" or "great"— 
means the same thing. Means: "There was 
room at the top for a cigarette that can refresh 
a tired and much tried taste. And Spur's that 
cigarette." 

In^he new Spur blend you find: ; 

The richness of the full-bodied Oriental leaf 
tempered by the mildness and fragrance of 
Burley and other choice home-grown tobaccos. 
It's a happy blend that brings out to the full 
that pood tobacco taste. 

And what's more ! Satiny imported paper, 
crimped, not pasted— makes an easier-drawing, 
slower-burning cigarette. A m igh ty neat "brown 
and silver" package; with triple wrapping, 
keeps Spurs fresh and fragrant. Just smoke a 
Spur and see. 



IF your dealer cannot supply yon, 
* send us j «2.00, and we shall be 
pleased to Bend you. by prepaid parcel 
post, a cartdnfof 200 Spur Cigarette! 
(10 packages). Address: 

•tit niTH XJBKVX, KSW IOEK CITT 



•t; 







^L,,. 




-—f ' Page fri 



our 



The Tribune 

.■-■■,-'-•■•' ; semi-wbbkLt ■■'■,-■■ 



ESTABLISHED 1001 



; Official County '. Paper 



' Pennington Printing 'Company 
■ PnMialKfts ; . 



Tlios. A. -Way, President 



Published' every Tuesday and Friday 

at 

. Thief Kiver Falls,' Minn. 



B. E. McVniliamg, Editor and Manager 



Foreign Advertising Representative ' 
THE.-aMER ICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 



Entered as second class . matter at the 
port office at Thief River Pails, Minn, 
■nder the Act of March 3, 1870. 



WOMEN IN THE CONVENTION 
In this, the dawn of a new politi 
cal era, we find the old battle 'scarred 
politicians rubbing a new and strange 
mist from bis bere-to-fore keen poli 
tical eyes. For the first time in his 
political life he is in political dark- 
ness. He finds hesitancy in his poli- 
tical steps. His political path is not 
clearly defiend. He has met with 
some laws and regulations, that for 
years have applied only to his home 
life, injected into hi s political- life. 
He is now forced to match his keen 
polticai wit against those of his 
wife and his mother-in-law, Mary 
Jane and even Bridget. Not in the 
privacy of his home, but from the 
smallest caucus in a little committee 
room to the floor of a groat political 
convention. 

The first women delegates to a na- 
tional convention appeared at Chica- 
go. The women were so small a 
minority there that their influence 
was chiefly felt in their support of 
candidates, several women making 
effective. speeches from the platform. 
At San Francisco there were 100 
delegates, 32 of them being dele- 
gates at large — that is, members of 
the big four of their respective states 
with enough alternates to bring up 
the ro!l of women officially connected 
with the convention to 350. 

As to the matter of candidates, the 
women were divided much the same 
as were the men, but in their head- 
quarters they were as a hive of Ital- 
ian bees. Their interest centered 
largely in the construction of planks 
which were submitted to the plat- 
- form committee. It appeared that 
every woman Uclcgure " had one' oi 
more planks all her own. Most -of 
these planks contained ideas /which 
would never get their heads above 
water in a ••uventiou of men only. 
Here are a few of the topics which the 
women delegates had up/for discus- 
sion in their plank-buifaing at the 
"San Francisco convention : 
i Maternity and infant welfare legis- 
lation; better support of the national 
children's bureau;. making permanent 
the emergency woman's bureau of 
the* department 'of labor; making a 
federal department of education 
with a seat 'in the cabinet for its 
head and better pay for teachers; 
decent bousing conditions for" work- 
ers; an eight-hour day and : equal -pay 
for women with men in industry; the 
abolition of child labor and the regu- 
lation of working conditions for ado. 
lesccnts. On the question of pro- 
hibition the women were divided 
Miss Markbury and ; the New York 
delegates insisted ; on a "moist" 
plank. 



have 
threat o: 






He ha i probably gone .to work,- al- 
though t leie is, a possibility in,; some, 
commuhi ties that-'he '-is" "pegging "as 
he frequ intly did before the days of 
prohibit! m. In either case; the money- 
he earns or acquires from generous 
persons seems to be spent on food 
clothing and other necessaries— with 
an Decisional luxury— instead of 
p.-ying f >r drinks 

The r< port further state that high: 
medical authorities have'. 'expressed 
their be ief that the use., of drags 
has not Increased greatly-, as ^was 
predietel by some persons who were 
fearful of prohibition. Laborer's; too, 



carried out their alleged 
"No. beer, no work." The 
real worry there, it appears, was hot 
the approaching withdrawal of in- 
drink, but fear that they 
out of work when brewer- 
listilleries closed. That fear 
roundless. Most of the 
eries have been kept right 
on other products, and the 
have found work easy to 
instances where the plants 



toxicatiu 
would b( 
ies and 
has pro\ 
big brev 
at work 
employes 
secure ii 

were clo; ed. Even our unnaturalized 
citizens lave shown far les s inclina- 
tion to e nigrate back to their native 
lands w lere alcho'ic beverages are 
plentiful, than was" expected of them. 

It is Believed that general com- 
munity t nd family welfare and hap- 
piness h ive improved' greatly under 
the new regime, That element, how. 
ever, has been so conjplicaerd by high 
wages ai d continuous employment 
that it isj difficult to' say 1 which is 
cause an 1 which is effect. 

"Retail stores and banks both seem 
to have found that their business has 
been greatly increased and benefited 
by the cry era. /' 

Whatv »r its handicaps may have 
been, prohibition has .largely over- 
come, tht m, and most persons who 
were dulious a few years ago are 
convinces today that it i s a good 
thing. 



WOOL GROWERS ASSOCIATION 
FORMED IN NEW MEXICO . 

Albuquerque, N. M. — The "Wool 
Growers' Co-operative association of 
New Mexico has been formed for the 
purpose of eliminating middlemen 
and increasing the .returns to the 
jsheep men. It is the intention this 
year to concentrate in a warehouse 
in Chicago, for grading and selling 
to spinners, as much of the wool 
clip as is pledged to the association. 
When the association is considered 
as permanently established and is 
sufficiently strong financially, ar- 
rangements will be made for one or 
more bonded warehouses in this state 
where the wool -will be graded and 
sold. Sheep men say. at present 
wool passes thru the hands of from 
two to five persons after the grower 
sells it until it reaches the man who 
makes, it into cloth. New Mexico's 
wool clip this year will, it is estimated 
amount to 18,000,000 pounds. Grow- 
ers have already pledged 3,000,000 
pounds to the association.' 

When the farmers, take action 
like the above plan they are getting 
somewhere. Eliminate the brokers, 
middle man and market parasites. 
Get down to common sense, econ- 
' omie principles and our troubles will 
be over. Producevs, manufacturers and 
consumer are necessary factors. The 
army of brokers and middle men are 
an added burden to all with nothing 
hut damage to come from their efforts. 
They do not try to reduce the cost 
• of manufacturers profits the higher 
tney are the more they justify their 
own position. 



PROHIBITION'S TEST 
Prohibition has had certain un- 
questioned results, says a report re- 
cency made to the Federal Council 
of Churches, after a.ciireful'inyesti- 
■ gation conducted in seven large cit- 
ies in the east and middle west. Per- 
haps the first and most noticeable one 
is the disappearance off the habit- 
ual drunkard. Statistics gathered 
from jails :and from alcholic. wards 
in hospitals, and the fact that many 
"cures" and farms for ' inebriates 
have beeu closed or. . converted to 
other useSj -.both, serve, to show that 
the drunkard is practically gone. 



THp PRICE OF SUGAR 
Sir,— "Sou have "raised an issue' 
several ti nes/on whether the price of 
iiigar ha; any relation to the law of 
supply aid demand, if that law is 
still operative in these United States. 
I enclose you a clipping from the 
Honolulu Star-Bulletin of June 15 
which may throw some light on the 
situation. 

The figures stagger^ one. A clerk 
on' a p!i ntation drajwing a salary 
of $200 ! month (house* fuel and 
4ight free) will receive for his ser- 
vices a Ittle over $1,200 a month 
due to tie high price of sugar and 
the bonu ies paid thereon, .. and the 
compensa ton of a number of the 
plantatior managers will be $100,- 
000 or more, assuming the price of 
sugar stays up. A coolie working 
in the fields will receive more for 
his labor [than the average bank 
clerk. I 

Of course, this abnormal situation 
is not satisfactory to the plantations. 
It is unwholesome and means trouble 
•for themjin the end, as they very 
well know, and nothing would please 
them mora than to have sugar, drop 
to 10 cei ts, perhaps even 5 cents. 
Tremendous profits may be made by 
them at i cents. To my mind the 
present price of sugar has nothing 
whatever to do with the law of sup- 
ply and d anand. Gambling in "raws" 
accounts lor it. If the , Cuban crop 
had beenf bought, the "speculators 
would have been forestalled, and the 
sugar fori our table would have cost 
us 14 cents instead^of 30. 

In the [meantime the plantation 
workers are getting rich, much to the 
disgust of the planters. Odd thing 
that the two who are most concerned 
about the! price of' sugar — the pro- 
ducer and the consumer — are given 
absolutely] no say. on the subject- 
Honolulu, Hawaii. J- A. C. 
— Harveyk 

DESERTING THE FARMS 

There probably are enough houses 
in the United States to make homes 
for everybody in it, but the people 
don't stay where the houses are, 
hence a [shortage that has become 
virtually [a national prohlem. Tne 
Republican platform devotes a plank 
to the subject, but the plank concerng 
itself with housing as it effects the 
cities rather than the. country. It 
emphasizes the desirability of t 
home-owning cirzenship and the im 
portance. of having homes that are 
adequately lit for human habitation. 

If there, were not a much greater 
flocking to the cities -from the farm 
than these ought to be, there would 
be no sue b 'acute housing problem as 
is now < xperienced in most of the 
populous :enters. Furthermore, food 
prices, in all probability, would not 
be so hig i because there would be a 
greater s apply 1 of every-day things 
to eat. 

■ The di rision of agriculture of 
Michigan recently issued a bulltein 
that refle *ts more or less accurately 
a conditii n that obtains in many of 
the state <. This bulletin declares 
that thre • times aj many men have 
left Mich gan farms in the last three, 
years as died or were killed in the 
Civil wa .. There are enough va- 
cant farm houses in Michigan to take 
care of t le population of. a city like 
Grand Ra lids. Enough >o£ these habi- 
tations h ive been deserted within a 
year to ^ ceombdate comfortably the 
people of Jackson. ■•'.:' - 

Nearly 9 per cent,; or 1,668,000 
acres,Vof Michigan's farms. are whol- 
ly idle tl is year, There- are only 
230,000 uen'and boys over 15 on 
the farm ,. meaning that the aver- 
age work ng for each l s 82.5 acres. 

This y ar 18,232 farms are-:idler 
compared with 11,831 a .yeartagp. 
In some nstances ;one-thild. Jojpire- 
balf of t ic people 'have rpoved-out 
of school districts/ ; in other com- 
munities [here ha<» 'been yery',little: 



THE TftlBUNE y 



'fato deser^bh.*^HeW'-;afigl-there*"the' 
irein^m^eve^Wg^^KfisWcJfT&e 
'aB'erS&Snac? ^^^CW'num"^ 
vacant on. farms, is approximately 
30,000 of which one-third were aban- 
doned within the last' year. / 
: Why this movement? .It can only 
he that city, life is .more alluring than 
: farm ttf eV Demajad tor/ industrial 
labor,? high ^a£<M t £ittba^ excitement 
—these, 'have; contribntefr' most ■■!(&> 
making J the cities disproportionately, 
populous; in some degree the condi- 
tion is. temporary,- but: the situation 
nevertheless is; serious, and there is 
no telling when.it will' be relieved—* 
Minneapolis Tribune. * 



The German crown prince would 
like to come/to America if he can 
pass the immigration tests ; if not, 
he will go to Spain.- Things have 
changed when the understudy of what 
was lately'.the "all highest" is almost 
an outcast, welcome nowhere. ';A 
man's a man for 'a that, for a' that," 
wasn't written of the Hohenzollern 
breed; — Tribune.. 

Perhaps he might find shelter with 
some of his friends here who an- 
nounced publicly during the war 
they '.'would not stand up as a target 
to be shot at-for any d— d country." 



TUESDAY, JULY 37, loao 



Senator Cummins who was a guest 
at the Harding home, discussed' the 
railroad situation thoroughly with the 
nominee. As joint author of the Cum. 
mins-Esch bill; under which the car- 
riers have been turned back to their 
owners, the Iowa senator is in a po- 
sition to give the candidate valuable 
advice on the problem. of transporta- 
tion. 

"I have been closely connected with 
Senator Harding officially and social. 
I3," said Senator Cummins. "I prob- 
ably have had as good an opportnnity 
to know his general view of .things 
as any other man... I think 'that he 
grasps the real problems • that we 
have to deal with Us well, if not more 
comprehensively, than any other man. 
of my acquaintance. His outlook is* 
all forward and not backward. With 
rospect to all the questions that will 
interest as in the next decade or two 
decades, he is as progressive as any 
man in the country, bar none." 

Senator Cummins said he had dis- 
cussed the railroad and transportation 
problems with Senator Harding in bi a 
recent visit, and had also discussed 
them many times before. Expressing 
his views on the railroad bill and the 
country's transportation problems 
Senator Cummins said that every 
day that passed was furnishing a 
further indication of the need of the 
11 .w railroad law. — Republican. 



Don't Wait for the Custom Thresher— 

Do Your Own Work Willi an 

E-B GEISER 



An E-B Geiser Thresher for Your Individual Work 
is the Best Buy, because— 



The E-B Geiser is not an experiment. It is a proven 
years of satisfactory service'at home and abroad to its credit. 



with 



many 



W. J. Bryan has been nominated 
by the prohibition party for president 
subject to his acceptance. Mr. 
Bryan is "somewhere in the Red 
River Valley In Minnesota" and can- 
not be found.. W e trust he means 
no offense. 



_It is ajsmall, compact machine with a big capacity. There is no waste 



space — it's all thresher and will do a clean job of threshing. 

Itjcleans the grain{without sieves. The cleaning 
grooved rollers,JandJis"inechanically perfect. 



done by combs and 



It runs light — it hauls light— it is light. It has few parts and no unnecessary 

material to"add weight. It is efficiently designed and built by skilled Workmen. 

' The E-B Geiser is not a Junior, but a real threshing machine capable of 
doing.fatjyour convenience, as efficient work as any big thresher. 



Rambeck-Stone 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 




The Place Where You 



Live is Worthy of 
Adornment 

The Furnishing of your Home is 
the most important thing' you do. 

, You live with your furniture. It means 
the difference between a mere place of exis- - 
tence and a charming, delightful abode of 
pleasure and ease. 

We can help you in many ways with the 
beautifying of your home. 



Larson furniture Co. I 



am at- Third 








ggsglBlj^ ,..;;-, -....,: -j.,-^ ,, .^ <: . 




GET 



-— Last Week of Campaign Opens With Hot Struggle for Winning Votes 



THE 
nigh 
long d 

intent on 
begin the 
hard-fought 
while work, 
can still pi 
work from 



rive 



winning 



TRIBUNE'S great $3,600 automobile campaign closes Saturday 

July 31st, at eight o'clock. With the close of the campaign, the 

for subscriptions and votes upon the part of the many workers, 

ng one of the wonderful prizes offered, will cease. And, with the cessation' of work, will 

cdunt of votes which will decide whether or not contestants shall come out victorious, from the 

race. Will you be one of the twelve winners? Very probably, if you have done worth- 

you will. But are you satisfied with a $25.00 cash prize for your long term of work? You 

yourself right in the lead, you can win the Buick "Six" by doing your campaign's best 

now to the end. 



ace 



Make 

put you off 

helped you 
' which will wii i 
amount of 
may have 



an I 



: goo 1 



Y 



YOUR VOTES NOW 



every moment count Go to those who promised you assistance and get it. Call on those who 

with one excuse or another, and get their subscriptions. Go to those who have not yet 

see that they do. In short; wind up your campaign in a whirlwind of energetic struggle and determined fighting 

for you. Only by so doing can you hope to win. Right Now, you can't feel sure of victory— no matter what the 

work you have done. Right now, you aren't certain that you have won, no matter how large a vote reserve you 

RACE IS STILL TO BE WON! Get your votes now— all that you possibly can— and get them in at once. 



TIE 



Do yo4 want to win? This is the final standing of contestants 

%■■'■■' i ■ . 



V 



District No. One 



Hairy Land, city 600,000 

.Mrs. Edwin O. Ericksori, city 608,000 
O. L. Cronstrom, city .... 603,000 

Robert Halvorson, city ..._.. 457,000 

.Leo Miller, city 10,000 



Mrs. Henry Sandee, MOD, city 10,000 

Julius 'Liden, RFD, city 10,000 

Mrs. Thomas Rowan, city ....610,000 

Luella "Peterson, city 60,000 

Mrs. H. F..Boreen, city 10,000 



District No. Two 



Betty Johnson,' Holt 100,000 

Sylvia Pierson, St. Hilaire ....620,000 
Maitha A&in, Paummer . . 663,000 

Mrs: E. Singer, Erie 600,000 

Gunder Tviet, Golden Valley ..500,000 



Arthur Oi'sbn, Middle Hiver 10,000 
Emma Anderson, Middle Biver 10,000 
B. O. Norby,- Goodridge .... 110,000 
Mrs. C. E. Luhdgren, Viking 60,000 



'/ 



The above published sfc nding of workers is the last of the campaign. If it is correct, it will stand as the final record for the 
judges— unaltered. If contestants' friends find any error or inaccuracy, it is urged that they notify the campaign manager at once If such notice of error is 
not receiyed before 6 p. m., F iday evening, no change will be allowed. DO YOU WANT TO WIN? If so— make your standing a winning one Build 
the foundation of the vote sb nding a rieserve of votes which WILL winl Get you votes now! 



Her 



e are Your Final Instructions— Read Them Carefully 



All votes 
Saturday nigh :, 
p. m. Friday 
all interested 
final vote couijt 
ballot box will 
count must be 
closed in time 
August 1. The 



upon 



or subscriptions to count in the campaign must be in the hands of the Campaign Manager by (eight o'clock on 

July 31st. No orders may be mailed for credit ih the offices of the Automobile Campaign Department after 6 

evening, July 8 1st. Inasmuch as candidates are requested to be present at the final count, which is to be open to 

I iarties, it is suggested that these candidates be sure to bring in their finai orders at the same time. This is the 

it to be published by the management of the Tribune's automobile campaign. From now on a sealed and locked 

be in the office of the manager, in which all orders can be placed. Orders mailed to be accepted for the final 

sent Special Delivery and directed to the Manage^ AutomobUe Campaign Department. The final count will be 

to give candidates orders for their prizes, so that the winners of the cars may have them for use on Sunday, 

count will be open at all times and complaints'or corrections can be made to the judges, to be 1 , passed on by them! 



HI Wlfl^Md lou Need 





^. fr _,: 



- ' ! 



l: 



Page Six 



Neighborhood 



Contributed by The Tribune's Wid -Awake Correspondents 



STEINER 

Mrs. C. N: Russell, who Las been 
visiting in this city with friends and 
reatives for the past week, returned 
to her home in Superior, Wis. 

A. Simmonson ca'Je'd at. the S. R. 
Rogers home Sunday. 

Misses Ruby and Pearl Warring 
and Jessie Rogers called at the 
Slack home Thursday evening^ 

"S. R. Rogers and daughter, Mabel, 
■drove to Thief River Fails the mid- 
dle of last week. ■ ' . • 

Harvey Copp did business in Thief 
River Fall's Monday. 

Mrs. Werner spent Sunday with 
the J. Meyer family. 

Ruth and Arnie Solem took dinner 
with the Roger family Sunday. 

Mrs. J. Berg gave a party in honor 
of ier two nieces and her nephew,' 
Mr. and Mrs. Baton and Miss Esther 
Johnson. The evening wa s spent In 
playing games and: mysic and at 
twelve o'clock iunch was served. 
About fifty young people were pres- 
ent. " 

Mrs. Katie Meyer and daughter, 
Esther, did- business in Thief River 
Fails the middle of the week. 

. Miss Inga Saugen, who has been 
spending her vacation at her mother's 
home, returned to Thief River Falls 
Tuesday to resume, her duties as 
nurse at the Physicians hospital. 

Luther- league was held at the John 
Swanson home Friday evening. A 
very large crowd was present and all 
report a good time. 

Miss Ruth Solem transacted busi- 
ness in Thief River Falls Thursday. 

Ruby and Bearl Warring spent 
Friday evening with «the Saugen 
f amii'y. 

Louis and William Meyers were 
business callers in Steiner Thursday 
evening. 






JVeSaiirw. 



Mis i Ida Sorenson returned Sat- 
urday from Warren where she has 
spent l few days visiting. . 

A i umber of people to the Busy 
Bee di strict gathered at the home of 
Mr. ai d Mrs. Julius Alby, newly- 
last Sunday afternoon to sur- 
Lem. A neat sum of money 
bounteous luncheon was brot 
o make the event more Inter- 



ihe 



weds, 
prise 
and a 
along 
e-sting. 

The 
Hall sjent Sunday at Strathcona as 
guests 
fcy. 

Rye 
the saftd ridges. 



Enoct Nelson farnilj and OJat 



of the Henning Backlund fam- 
harvesting Is commencing on 



and Mrs. S.Rafteseth spent 
visiting with friends at An- 



Mr. 
Sunda; 
gus. 

Mrs J Axel Kron has been at Thief 
River : 'alls the iast week to 
medics I treatment from Mrs. Kolberg. 

Mrs, Carl Iirooin. west of town, is 
report* 1 on the" sick list the latter 
part ol the week. 

Mr; ind Mrs. L. L.. Furan and 
daughter, Violet, went to Goodridge 
Monda; ' morning to look after bust 
ness interests during the day. 




I ! 



TUESDAY, JULY 37, loao 



IQC&LNADgff 



GOOI CREAM CHECKS 
FOR MONTH OF 



P. Engfilstad . 
Hans Anton 
Jens Kirk 
Waldie lGhristenson 



$383.08 
344.04 
279.43 
269.28 



ROSEWOOD 

Twenty six auto loads of people 
from Grand Forks, comprising the 
members of the Commercial Club and 
of the Grand Forks state band paid 
us a pleasant visit last Friday at noon 
to advertise the Grand Forks fair 
, and to become acquainted. The 
tournament .arrive! here shortly be- 
fore dinner and Stopped for a while 
in our town, where the band played 
several selections and representatives 
of various advertising firms called 
briefly upon the ■■ main business 
houses in town, leaving large amounts 
of adverstisements both for the fair 
and for various local business inter- 
ests of Grand Forks. A representa- 
tive "was in town a few days before 
announcing their, arrival and the 
time and most of the town people 
as well as some farmers had turned 
out to see the affair, i The party, who 
were making a days tour in this sec- 
tion in the interests named above, 
' went from here to Thief River Falls 
where a stop was made for dinner 
and where considerable advertising 
was done. 

At the annual school meeting held 
at Rosebank Saturday evening, Alex 
Hellquist was elected as clerk for the 
coming year and Joel E. Shoberg, 
treasurer. There will ba seven months 
teaching next term and the sum of 
$1,500 was voted in to defray ex^ 
penses. Through vote- it was decid- 
ed that the school building shall be 
open for ail business and public meet, 
ings of a peaceful nature and in the 
interests of the people of the dis- 
trict, and ammling last years closing 
order when the schoolhouse was clos- 
ed for everything except school pur- 
poses. . 

■ The Swedish Young Peoples So- 
ciety held their monthly meeting in 
the Congregational- church in town 
last Saturday evening with a fair 
attendance. Rev. Drotts- of "Viking 
was in charge < Meetings 'were also 
conducted twice on Sunday at that 
church and a christening service was 
heVd at the home of Carl Mellem at 
five p. m. 

Hejmer Bloom in company with 
three friends left Sunday 'morning 
for a days outing tour to visit with 
friends at Warren and Grand Forks. 

Mrs. J. Hanson in [company with 
several children- from . Grygla are 
visiting this week with Mr. and Mrs. 
John Raf teseth . ■ . ] 

Oswald Hellerud and Miss Ellen 
Holm, of Twin VaHcyj were Sunday 
.Visitors at the A. S. Holm home in 
town. I 

Axe} Larson, who has been em- 
ployed at Radium this summer, re- 
turned home "fast Saturday. 

Miss Mabel TJland, of Radium, and 
the Lloyd Crown family from Rocks- 
bury, were Sunday visitors at the 
John 'Bloom home. : 

Miss Tena -Westby,. .who has been 
employed at Adams; for several 
months, came home for- a vacation 
with her parents iast Saturday. 



Henry Pope 223.44 

A. J. Fdnnesdal 220.50 

Fred Cobp i ...... . 219.79 

Mrs. J. fr. Berg . , . . . ..... 189.30 

R. M. Johnson ..........;... 181.20 

Henry £oop 179.14 

H, T. Waale ........... .. 176.53 

H. A. Mjitthees 175.61 

Anflnd Ness 170.68 

Mrs. Mopbeck 160.00 

A. C. Sanonson 156.60 

Paul Etfgelston ........ . . . 155.83 

J' hn Johnson '. 152.32 

A. K. Hilggy ..... . . ... . . . 150.53 

Peter Vbldness ,. ; . 148.93 

C. Odegaard 145.76 

S. Sorenson 145.62 

P. Solenji ..;........ .144.99 



DO YOU MEMBER 

The day Fat and you found the b.'f tramp dog (the one that you 
made. the harness for)? 'Member how he fMlcwed you bon-.e f r >m 
the woods where you'd been flshln'? You tried to <:ns>6e him avar iwo 
or three times and he'd only run back a little way tin?, stand a r-: look 
at you. And finally you let him come up to yo« and h<* was r i mud 
and smelled like he'd been bavin' a tusse! with a skunk. An". Fat 
Baid:e"Come on, what you say we keep h!i.i." 'jiemDCi- hov- he 
Jumped all over youafter you decided to UUe hlu home': Ss.-.ined a* 
though he understood all about it. And just ami. th? time yon gov 
near the bouse Fat says, "Do you 'spose y«r moth.rll let you ken? 
him?" . And Just about then you beard Ma's familiar voice: "No, I 
should say not; don't yon dare, bring that filthy creature another, inch 
nearer this housel" BLUNK — and all the joy of ufe flew, and even 
the dog's ears dropped, and you looke> at Fat and Fat looked at yos. 
And then began th,e plea for the dog. 'Member how you promised Ma 
that you'd never let him in the house and you'd earn all '.lie noney to 
feed him and about fifty other , promises, and after a while eho says, 
"Well, go on, but take him somewhere and »ive him a bath; that 
lawful smell will be all over your clothes" Oh! boy— 'mi'mber how 
yon felt then? And the dog begun waggtn' his ail and y iU vent b^'l: 
«f *ne house and gave him a scrubbln'. 



Joe Oskt 
Olaf Brivik 
S. Wiberg 



142.72 
140.24 
137.96 



HI&HEST CASH 'PRICES 
Paid for all Kinds 



ex 



LIVE POULTRY 



at 



DeCremer's jMeat 
Market 



Aug. Koblin 137.52 

Mrs. P. JFagerstrom 135.59 

J^hn Sttoberg 134.69 

L. HitteMahl 133.32 

C. M . Hdverstad 132.58 

Nick Meyer ............. 129.10 

Ludvig Larson 128.46 

C. Lident 12828 

Ed Edman 127.72 

Christ Nelson 127.38 

K. Finstid 126 .97 

6. L. Skbnovd 126.04 

C. H. Svianson 125.93 

Fuller & [Gordon . : 125.55 

John A. Sundt 125.48 

Hans Sande 122.78 

S. Torgeison 120.77 

K. Solhejm ...... ..... : . >T ... 119.97 

C. Beiswenger . . . .-.-. .-.-. ... . 118.79 

Westlake! Bros. 117.51 

Carl EricJtson 116.26 

R. Oen .....; 11625 

John B3ooni ......... 115.10 

Mrs. Kat4 Meyer 113.90 

WIB Smith .....;• 113.66 

A PrestBy 113.39 

Ben Rosindahl 113.02 

Gunder Olson ......... ... . 112.71 

O. O. Hofdahl ......... .... 111.16 

Henry Ljndblom 110 91 

C. Christtnsen 110.08 

Fred Beefbower .......... 108.33 

F. B A Coiklin . ... 107 65 

Ole. Ahlsjrom 107.31 

Mrs. J. H. Waiters ; '■'. 106.57 

John Sjosvold -. ;' 106.21 

J. Kiungtess . . . 104.18 

P. Horns eth 103.98 

Albert Hjnson ........... 101.88 

O. S. Bre land '. 101.49 

Ed Hansen . ■....-. 101.35 

nestad 101:12 



Peter Hadeen 79.00 

Halvor H. Olson 78.08 

E. Yonke 76.76 

N . E. Muzzy , 76.46 

Oiuf Omiid " 76:13 

Gust Wilkin ......;...... 76.85 

Emil Kranse 75.66 

O. N. Anderson ......'. ..,. 7539 

0. Ordahl ..."...., 75.38 

Tom Holton 75.35 

Aj Jorde. ...';... 74.77 

Ole Gesselquist 74.58 

N. A. Nelson 74.51 

Louis Aaseby 74 .09 

Nels Guhderson 73.37 

Th. Bje. ke 73,21 

Nels Nora . . . ^ 72.2.5 

H. C. Wooison ; . . . . 72.16 

C. O. Asp 71.79 



T.K. Ho; 

Wm. Hoi 

C. J. Eckjwall 

John Swe nson 

A Feragi n 

Carrie Johnson . . 



. . . 101.08 

. . . 100.75 

... 99.99 

. . . 98.83 
99.52 

N. Rhodefeaard 99.20 

Mrs. Sigfid Saunder ...... 98.89' 

A| H. Attrood 98.33 

... 97.34 

... 96.90 

.... 96.00 

Pejerson ............. 95.81 

... 95 23 



Ole.Dahl 

Mrs. The^. L. Olson 

C. Oien 



quist 



J. M. 

James Rafcnsey 
F. M. Eaiize 
Ed Grunc hous 
Ole Barb ilz 
Syvert H inson 
Mrs. A. ^ elo 
S. E. Huit 
John Hel 
H. B'.iasoji . 
J. Bergqi 1st 
C. Slinge 
Isaac Isa icson 
W,.J. M<Crum 
D W. Ajjers 
S. Hasby 
Aug. Carbon 
Iver N. E 
A. Huseb r- 
Doles 



L. 
L. O 







. . 94.99 

...... 94.37 

....<. 93.74 

...... 93.24 

;..-.'.. 92.76 

.. 91.23 

...... 90.40 

....i. 89.90 

..'... : . 8816 

...... 87.03 

84.94 

..... 84.87. 

..... 84.61 

...... 83 32 

83.32 

...... 8252 

..... 82.46 

8228 

John KeOterg 82.06 

Julius Hanson 81.54 

-. 81.19 

Sam Nabl en ;. ; 81.15 

Paul Stoc 1 .';. . 80.91 

Ri Fen gen 79.36 

Stef seth '. 79,11 



trand 



John Krebechek 
Fred Hollander 
Louis Harare . 
Henry Sande . . 
John Ristau . . . 
Thos.; Sanders 
C. Weiner .... 
Hans Fje'.d . . . 
Aug. Ristau . . 



71.30 
71.24 
7111 
70.92 
70.80 
70.79 
70.58 
70.55 
70.49 



Ojson & Boe 54.62 

Martin Rust 54.47 

G. ,Sneide r '......- 53.99 

James Wilson . , 53.86 

Erick Soderberg . . ..'. ...... 53.70 

O. Valsvik 53.68 

P. M . Peterson 53.68 

Ed. Vigen 53.40 

And. Hoverstad 53.19 

O. B. Gunderson 52.92 

Per Sorenson 52.41 

Mrs. L. Osness . 52.38 

Anton Anderson 52.32 

Tandrup Saltvedt 



Hanson & Barzen 

Wheat, No. 1 northern, per bu. 
Wheat, No. 2 northern, per bu. 
Wheat, No. 3 northern per bu. 
Wheat, No. 4 northern, per bu. 
Durum wheat, No. 1, per bu. 
Durum wheat, No. 2, per bu. 
Durum wheat, No. 3, per bu. 
Durum wheat, No. 4, per bu. 
Oats, per bu. 
Rye, per bu. 
Barley, per bu. 
Flax, No. 1, per bu. 
Flax, No. 2 per bu. 
Bran, per cwt 
Shorts, per cwt. 



$2.66 
2.61 
2.56 
2.36 
2.64 
2.61 
2.56 
2.49 
.83 
2.03 
.1.02 
3.20 
3.15 
2.80 
2.90 



Teuam Seed, Grata & Supply Co. 



Cracked! Corn, per cwt 


3.70 


Whole com, per cwt; 


3.60 


Hay, per bale 


1.50 


Middlings, per cwt. 


2.90" 


Oil meal' 


4.60 


Thief River Produce Co. 




Hens, light, per lb 


.14 


Heavy hens, per lb 


.18 


Roosters," per lb 


.10 


Turkeys,: per lb 


.18 


Horse hides .03@.05 


Calf hides 


.15 


Horse,hides • .04 to .05 


Eggs, per doz. 


.30 


T.R. Co-Operaave, Creamery 




Butter, per lb 


.56 


Bdtterfal., per lb 


.56 


Uilk, per!quart 


.10 



'"'IIHHH I II I MII I MiMtMH i mH i m t MIIIMI IIt 



BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE' 



frR C 

INSURANCf 




we advise - and urge you to - ■ 
call ;Oo us once and secure " ', 
a fire insurance policy. We 't- 
will guarantee to place your 
insurance in force; with the 
best: company immediately. 
Insure your house, vour 



furniture, 
apparel 



fittings, wearing " ' 



etc. 



Lawrence Mtg\ Co. 



' ai5 Main Aye. N. 



Pbone 443 • ■ 



-.-: f 



« > ♦ t ♦ M M M t t M' HI I MMt l llllMH t t IHI l i ' 



• ; ♦ « h i m m » t it m m n t tn iii n i H M » ^ 

Look At It in Any Way 



James Crosby 51.13 

M. X Graetinger 50.90 

OSe Droivold 50.34 

J. L. Montague . 50.34 

Ole Helgoland 50.30 

J H. Saunes 50.29 

Mrs. B.. Martinson 50.15 



C. Steen . .. . 70 18 



Nels Burtness 
Gust Berggren . ; '. 
Bert Thorstad . ... 
S. O. Brestegaard , 
K. Ystesundo ...',, 
Mrs. M. O. Saugen 

Hubert Buck 

Ole Skaar". , 

J. M. Theige ... .. 
Paul Schenck . . ; . . 
Gordon Olson ...... 

Emil Ristau 

S. O. Lee 

Ole Linstad ...... 

C. A. Nelson 



69.50 
69.49 
69.44 
69.31 
69.25 
68.98 
68.92 
68.86 
67.90 
67.53 
67.23 
66.96 
66.89 
65.09 
64.62 



Atf, Morin ........ 64.48 

Louis Dimen 

S.-W. Lauback .'. 

Haugen Bros 

A. W. Hanson . : . , 
A. Bergland ..... 

John Martinson . . 
J. Adsero ........ 

J. B. Solomonson 
Joel Shoberg 



63.86 

63.38 

62.69 

62.68 

. 62.13 

.... 61.95 

61.75 

61.53 

....-: 61.29 

Caul P. Anderson ..... ... '.-. 60.94 

T. J. Wasley 60.92 

Mrs. Gutteinid :.......... 60.82 

A,. Swanjord 60.01 

Hugh Best 59.78 

Ben Kveste '. . . 59.52 

Axel Krohn . . . . ; 59.28 

John Batten — 58.97 

John N. Swanson 58.21 

Mrs. G. Ross 57.35 

J. G. Sorenson 57.33 

EUef Tollefson ' 57.10 

Mrs. A-. C. Hanson 57.02 

N. B. Swanson 55.73 

G. J. Nordhagen 55.56 

Albert Olson '... 55.32 

R. L. Muzzy '. . 55.15 

A.E.Anderson 54.91 

S. T. GJervold 54.62 



Order Limiting Time to File Claims 
and for Hearing Thereon 

State of Minnesota, as.. County of 
Pennington, in Probate Court. . 

In the Matter of the Estate of 
August O. Schneider, Decedent. 

Letters of administration, this day 
having been granted to Nick Bund- 
hund 

It is Ordered, That the time within 
which all creditors of the above 
named decedent may present claims 
against his estate in this Court, be, 
and the same hereby is, limited to 
six months from and after the 'date 
hereof; and that Saturday, the 29th 
day of January 1921, at Ten o'clock 
A. M., in the Probate Court Rooms 
at the Court House at the City of 
Thief River Falls, in said County, be, 
and the same hereby is, fixed and 
appointed as the time and place for 
hearing upon and the examination, 
adjustment and allowance of sucn 
claims as'ishall be presented within 
the time aforesaid. » 

Let notice hereof be given by the 
publication of this order in The Tri- 
bune; published at Thief River Falls, 
Minp.,, as provided by law . 

Dated July 26th. 1920. 

Ira C. Richardson, 
Judge of Probate. 



our milk is the very best you 
can use in your Lousehold. 
First,' because of its absolute 
purity and sanitary cleanli- 
ness. , Next because of its' 
superior richness and there- 
fore in nourishing quality. 
Finally because in spite of 
its admitted superority in 
every way it will cost you 
no more 10 use it. Why not 
at least, then, give it a 
trial? 

•f ± 

Thief River Co-Operative Creamery 
Associaion 

THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINN. 

Httt i mnu i H444iH t mi m i l I M ++C 




Hemstitching 
MRS. McKINNEY 

Scandia Block 

'Phone 252 

Hours 10 to 1 2; - 1 to 5 



EMPIRE FARMS CO. 

Capital $25,000 

Lands Loans City Property Insurance 

Bring your business to us. 
We Promise cpurtesy and efficiency 

215 Main Ave. N. 

'Phone 443. 

Thief River Palls, Minnesota 



iW/ATCJf^SrM 




Why You Can Trust Your 
Winchester Rifle 

FOR your protection in any possible 
emergency, your Winchester Rifle is 
severely tested at the factory before you 
aire allowed to buy it. 

It must, pass the most rigorous tests 
for strength, accuracy, dependability, 
and smoothness and reliability of action. 

Knowing what it has stood up under, 
the manufacturers back it with a sweep- 
ing guarantee. 

For your next hunting trip, get a tested 
Winchester which you can trust. 

Come in and see the different models, 
and let us tell you all about them and 
their Winchester Ammunition. 

Bottem Hardware Co. 

THE tVtNCJrEST£R STORE 



J 



taflr^M^ w& r - 



^^^^^^^ 



__L 






■-■o»fc..-V^: t .:g'ilU!, l ...' ^.-;.',:V | ^j.'. 1 ,— r~r 



^_,i. . 



^ 



r'f*VM^tmT2 



TUESDAV^ULY 37, 



^•t^ ??&$:. 



:i^»":. 



PENNSYLVANIA ROAD EMPLOYES 

FORECAST TROUBLE WHEN 

12,000 ARE LAID OFF 



"Washington, . July 20. — The gov- 
ernment is watching " with deep 
interest" the proposed:. layoff of men 
by the Pennsylvania railroad " and 
the closing of the American Wooi'en 
mills, it was said at toe White House 
•today. j 

It. 'was not indicated, if any action 
was contemplated. 



*■' 1* " r ^'- ' s ' ':i'w'-':''?i'-^i>r'P-. 










fp=C^T 



-'I 



Phialdei'phia, July i 20 — Prepara- 
tions were being made today by Pen- 
nsylvania railroad officials here to 
dismiss 12,000 men in the Eastern 
operating division. 

In announcing the action, officials 
of the company said .it: was taken to 
"bring about improved efficiency in 
operating forces and reduce operating 
escpenses." Approximately 10 per 
■cent of the total lamber employ ej in 
the Eastern division win be let out. 

The company said- the men would 
be needed in other divisions. 

Trouble was forecast by employes, 
who declared the'ir belief that the 
roads' action was taken because of the 
recent outlaw strike. All classes of 
workmen with t he exception of engin- 
eers, firemen, conductors, brakemen 
and switchmen will be affected. — 
Minneapolis Tribune. 



FARM BUREAUS TO HAVE 

WOOL AGENT IN CHICAGO 



The Minnesota Federation of farm 
bureaus is planning to secure a rep- 
resentative in Chicago to watch the 
weighing, grading and! handling of 
wool shipped from this state, says 
F L. French, secretary, of the Fed- 
aeration.. The expense for such ser- 
vice wii'l be prorated against the 
sales for the individual consignors 
and will be in addition; to the three 
cents per pound charged by- the con- 
signee. The expense for the service 
shouil cost from 1-0 to % a cent per 
pound, depending upon : the amount 
•received and whether the wool is re- 
ceived at one time or in small ship- 
ments extending, thru several weeks 
or months. 

Six conferences of officers of wool 
-selling associations have recently 
been held in Minnesota— -at Marshall, 
Manknto, Rochester, Crookston, Wa- 
dena and Duluth. The sentiment in 




AMERICA NO EXPERIMENTAL STATION 

By Ji doe Maetin J. Wade, Vnitei States District Court, Iowa City, Iowa.- 

"The American people must open their eyes to the con- 
dition which exists. The government must have the 
heartiest-co-operation hi its campaign to deport every un- 
desirable alien. The day has gone when fools shall speak 
of this country as the great heaven for all agitators and 
the experimental station for all political creeds. The 
United States is, and shall continue to be, the haven- for 
all oppressed peoples who wish to come here and become 
Americans. But America is for- Americans only."— The 
Lincoln Daily Star. 

LET US ALL AGREE THAT ONE THING IS SET- 
TLED in this country. It is settled right THERE- 
FORE IT IS FINALLY SETTLED, the form of govern- 
ment established by the fathers ' of the Republic shall 
i stand. Stand as it was builded. Stand until time is no 

more. We do need the aid of wild eyed anarchists, nor long haired commun- 

n™. n ?t™.'£ braineii "socialists. ,Our form of government is FIXED AND 
PERMANENT. 

.. ^X ^ wh0 cann ot live under this form of government, should buy 
a ticketjto some land which suits him better. The world is wide. There are 
countries with no fixed Stable form of government. Perhaps these countries 

3 e r. i me tn08e wh0 want to establish experimental stations. 
1.1 i i?°»K m e WI S come in tilis country when any alien who does not declare 
his intention to become a citizen of this free land within six months after he 
enters phr ptes, will at once be deported. And the alien who does not take 
the Oatt of Allegiance to : our country, and to our flag, as soon as the law 
win permit, will find himself on the homeward voyage returning to the land 
£!L?!v S R&L. We hSTe be ™ over-tolerant FOURTEEN MILLION ALIENS 
HS2. N l'fJS 1R I9 AN S0IL - SEVEN MILLION OF WHOM CANNOT SPEAK 
T .SSn L j£?F A , < SL 0P AMERICA, TELLS A STORY OF OVER KINDNESS 
WHICHJHAS BEEN REPAID BY VILLAINOUS INGRATITUDE 
r . ■^^^h^2T BBRB ' CHILDREN, WORKMEN, AND EMPLOYERS OF 
I ABOR4-ALL LOYAL AMERICANS— will yon not fevote five mintites today 
to an earnest study of some of the great truths of our National life? 



■^ E£3£? RS ' MOTHERS, CHILDREN, WORKMEN, AND EM- 

I PLOTTERS OF LABOR— ALL LOYAL AMERICANS-will you not 

devote five minutes to-day, to an earnest study of some of the great 

truths of our National Hfet "^ 



¥ 



in rei'atijin to the potato supply and 
demand lof the United States very 
much as] Kansas and North .Dakota 
do to the] wheat supply of the nation. 



The g 



las Grown Unnoticed 



_ owth of the potato industry 
has been .reasonably slow, and the in- 
crease o acreage from year to year 
has not been sufficiently spectacular 
to call the attention of the public in 
genera! rp the growing importance of 
the industry. 

The southern limit of the northern 



potato b -It 



is, generally speaking. a 
iine that runs across the center of 
southern Michigan, through Wiscon- 
sin near the vicinity of Portage, up 
past the Twin Cities and across the 
Mmnesoti border in the vicinity of 
Moorhenij, reaching the Canadian line 
to the nqrth of Devils. Lake. Out of 
the crop moves southward 



this area 



during th » greater portion of the year 



to the gn at 
sas city, gt 



. - -._ — sag CIC _ 

general favored the consignment of , pjttsburg 



the wool of the several; associations 
as the best means of disposing of it 
this season •• 



-1 



ARMY WORM ATTACK 

ON CROP :IS LIKELY 

Because hundreds of the adult 
moth of the army worm are being 
caught in traps! set by/the entomoi'o- 
..^.gist at University Fa/m, A. G. Rug- 
gles, state entomologist at University 
Tarm fears an attack on! Minnesota's 
crops later in the summer. This is 
the season atwhifch the moths lay 
their eggs which/ hatch in about 
three weeks and/the wet weather is 
very favorabite t<5 the development of 
the pest, says Mr. Ruggles. County 
agents and others who discover the 
moths anywhere in the state should 
report at once to jfr. Ruggles, Uni- 
versity Farm, St. Paul. | 

The army worm may be controlled 
with poisoned bran bait made of 50 
pounds of bran, two of Paris gree or 
white arsenic, mixed together dry 
and then moisened with one-fcaJSf 
gallon cheap molasses dissolved in 
from 8 to 10 quarts of water. 



Experienced ' 

Mrs. Multiklds — Well! : The chil- 
dren are dressed in less- time than 
ever before. And you said you had 
no experience with children. 

The New Nurse Maid — -Yes'm. But 
for the last two years I |was in the 
show as dresser for a dog and mon- 
key act. 



JELLING 300,000100 
BUSHELS OF: SPUDS 

.MINNESOTA HAS A PROBLEM IN 
GREAT EXPORT TUBER CROP 
DISPOSING OF NATION'S 



By Hugh J i Hughes, Director of 
Markets, Minnesota Department ..of 
Agriculture. 

The potato business of the -north- 
west is of great and ever growing 
importance. Minnesota is : not only 
one of the leading states in point of 
production, but also in | point of 
Wisconsin and Michigan being its 
nearest rivals in both particulars. 
Out production for . several years 
. past has averaged close ; to thirty 
million bushels, of which amount 
not far from twenty million bushes 
, travel by rail to points outside the 
j state. The three states named stand 



points. from these points, the cars 
are furlb ;r distributed to the/retail 
stores in the buying regions as far 
south as :he gulf and as far east as 
■New Yor :. 

Easten Competition at Chicago 

The Ne v England crop largely sup- 
plies the great north Atlantic cities, 
though sojne of it find s its way as far 
west as Chicago and St. Louis. 

The we item crop is relatively smal. 
in amoun:, and supplies a special 
trade the country over. You will find 
the westirn irrigated potato in the 
Twin Citi ;s and Duluth markets sell- 
ing at fai cy prices to the hotels and 
to those Who wish a particular size 
and appearance for table purposes. 

Ear y Spuds from South 

The Southern potatoes, including 
those gro vu along the coast from 
New. Jers y to Texas, come onto the 
market a lout the time our northern 
crop begijs to disappear, and fill in 
the gap o C early summer. This stock 
sells on tl e northern market at fancy 
prices, no because of quality, but for 
the same reason that oranges or any 
other com modify out of season brings 
exception; I- prices. 

Certine I Seed Growing Industry . 

One im >orta.nt phase. of the norths 



to 
fire 
are 
a 



markets of Chicago. Kan. 
Louis, Cincinnati, Toledo 



ern potato industry ^s the production 
of seed stock for the southern fields. 
We suppiy the growers f rorS eastern 
Nebraska southward to the gulf with 
the bulk of their seed. Their climate 
requires the continual introduction of 
northern grown stock, and the de- 
mand is for potatoes that are sound, 
free from disease, hard, and rather on 
the green side when dug. The Red 
River Valley supplies a Very large 
quantity of this seed, and throughout 
Minnesota and Wisconsin, the grow- 
ing of certified seed for the southern 
trade is becoming one Cjf the large 
bra'nehes of the industry. 

The last Minnesota legislature pro- 
vided for a state seed certification 
board, of which Professor Tolaas, of 
University Farm.S t. Paul, is the sec- 
retary. Those interested in the pro- 
duction of commercial seed should 
get in touch with hiin and learn the 
requirements of seed certification, 
which are too detailed and out of 
place in this particular review of the 



Indianapolis and similar potato situation as a whole to be dis- 



cussed in full. 

Most Potatoes Leave State 

Thb main bulk of the potato crop 
produced and sold in Minnesota finds 
itself carried in unbroken carlots to 
points weil south of the Minnesota 
border. Only a very few of these cars 
shipments go into consumption in the 
Twin Cities or Duluth. Local produc- 
tion provides largely for the needs of 
these points and for practically all 
the towns in the state, though it is 
true that there are a comparatively 
few cars of potatoes shipped into 
southern Minnesota towns when the 
crop for any reason is insufficient to 
meet the local demand. 

Graded Potatoes Preferred 

We must consider the requirements 
of the ontside trade as controlling our 
grading and loading. The market in 
such. centers as Kansas City, which 
distributes to a arge area southward, 
prefers a good, firm, medium-sized 
clean potato of one variety. For such 
potatoes, there is always a good 
chance of Teaching the top market 
and when market conditions are dull, 
potatoes so graded invariably get the 
preference. 

Use New Sacks 

It is possible to sell poor or un- 



graded: stock, but always at a dis- 
count, and when the market is crowd- 
ed,' -very often at a serious loss. The 
fact .'that usually the cars are ulti- 
njately broken up into small lots by 
jobbers or retail customers makes it 
especially desirable to have the po- 
tatoes sacked; and if sacks are used, 
it pays, especially when prices run 
as they are now doing, to use new 
sacks,, filled to uniform weights of 
either 100 or 120 pounds, labeling 
each sack with the name and home 
address of the shipper. 
.The amount that is put. into cars 
depends on the season, and somewhat 
on the. trade requirements. Jobbers 
and retail buyers in the southern 
markets like small cars, from 600 to 
700 bushels per car, but the car 
shortage . has necessitated heavy 
loading during the last couple of 
years. ' 

Provide Heat in Cold Weather 

There is danger of overloading/ es- 
pecially when the weather is hoV_or 
when it is extremely cold- and suffi- 
cient space i s not allowed for proper 
heating. Cars shipped early in the 
season can go out with a fair degree 
of safety withoue heating, but when 
freezing weather comes, it is ex- 
tremely unwise to take, the risk of 
shipping except in refrigerated cars, 
or else, in cars that have been care- 
fully fitted for the purpose. ' To prop- 
erly line a car for shipment in reason- 
ably cold weather will cost about 
?!>0.00, « 

Field Frost Worst Menace 

Every season heavy losses are in- 
curred by shipping potatoes in im- 
properly heated cars, but the greatest 
losses along this line come from what 
the trade calls "field frost." Where 
the ground is frozen an inch or two 
in depth and thaws out, many of the 
potatoes are nipped by the frost. 
These potatoes do not immediately 
show this freezing, but the tissues 
have been swelled and broken, and 
after the potatoes are on the car, 
they begin to swell and to break 
down. The car may pass the first in- 
spection without showing "field 
frost," but it wiil appear before ar- 
rival at its final destination. Since 
the . practice of the trade is to buy 
subject to inspection on arrival, the 
man who ships "field frosted" pota- 
toes invariably ha s one or two things 
happen to him. He either has the 
loss on that shipment " charged back 
to him or, for the future, he i s put on 
the list of doubtful shippers, and in 
the prices paid subsequent deliveries, 
the southern buyer recovers for the 
losses on the early shipment. In 
other words the shipping of "field 
frosted" potatoes is the worst pos- 
sible kind of business for the grower. 
The only way to avoid this is to get 
the crop out and moving as soon as 
possible after it is ripe. If one pre- 
fers to sell on a later market, he 
should not ailow delay in harvesting. 

One year with another, the losses 
from "field frosted" potatoes are much 
greater than the cost s of the extra 
handling from the' field to the bin and 



Page 7 



^ I. 



from the bin to the car. 

The first essential to the successful 
marketing of potatoes is like that for 
any other crop; to furnish a quality 
that in every respect .will stand-up 
with the best that other sections' of 
shippers can give. 

Minnesota has wonderful opportun- 
ities in this direction, her soil and 
climate fit her to retain the position 
she now holds as the leading potato 
exporting state of the nation. The 



other things involved in the problem 
— the proper choice of varieties, the 
selection of seed, the spraying of the 
crop for the control of disease, dig- 
ging the. potato at the proper time, 
proper sacking and loading anr ship- 
ment are a(! matters for the growers 
and for the growers' association to 
handle, and. when handled properly, 
potato growing here in the northwest 
will become one of the most stable 
profit able ines of farm production. 




: Often a suffering man or woman will ask a Chironric- 

£L W *m the t pine has t0 d0 witn the health of the 
body. Do you think that Spinal Adjustments can help me' 
Ive been troubled with constant headaches and stomach 
sickness for years, but have been unable to find relief. Will 
,?I^T,^ hel P . me? " These and other questions are reg- 
■^L . t \. Ch,r °P ractic offers real hope, because it gets 
closest^. Nature's way in helping the sick to get well and 

The human body i s so constituted that it is unnatural 
for disease to creep in without cause. The nerve system is 
designed to give perfect health to all oigans and keep them 
tn- repair. If through abnormal iurvature, jolts, strains, 
fails or wrenches at some time in life, the moveable bones 
or the spine are displaced, even slightly, thev press on these 
nerves and obstruct the flow of life-energy. Weakness ant] 
disease result in the organs that these injured nerves feed 
In stomach trouble for instance, the nerves to 
are subject to pressure by certain bones of 
Through scientific adjustments 



the stomach 
the spine. 



CHIROPRACTIC 



TER WAY TO HEALTIiTOJ 



and 



relieves this pressure, normal conditions are restored 
Nature builds up the weak and diseased stomach until it is 
Healthy. The same method applies to other ailments due to 
pressure on certain nerves. Try Cbriropractic (KI-RO-PR\K- 
TIC) adjustments. Get well and stay well. 



T.M.Kolberg,D.C. 



Phone 107 



Palmer Graduate 
Over First National Bank 



Thief River Falls 




It Is Just as 

DANGEROUS 




le 



without adequate Tornedb insurance as it is 
insurance. In the majority of cases fire losses 
{not total but when a tornado strikes, it means 
toxal loss to everything in its path. 

We have on display.in our bank actual kodak 
/Pictures of the Fergus Falls tornado of last year 
whi jh shows clearly the enormous destruction of 
property in that town. 

Ratea Extremely Nomina] u fellowii 
Dwelling homes and content* $4 per $1,000 lor Shears 
Mercantile bondings and contents $5 per SliOOO for 3 years 



Ffirst National Bunk 

. Thief River Falls, Minnesota 
Resources Over One Million Dollars 



Sedan Convenience 
at Low Cost 



Overland Sedan Arei-af es 27.6 Mile* Per 
Gallon in Lo» Angles- Yoiemifo Run 



THE OVERLAND ,SEDAN is proving to owners 
everywhere the advantages of closed-car summer 
motoring. A permanent top keeps off sun and rain; 
plate glass windows shut out wind and dust. And 
now-the 355 mile Los Angeles-Yosemlte Economy 
Run shows remarkable fuel average of 27.6 miles 
per gallon— a striking endorsement of this Sedan's 
economy and the riding qualities of Triplex Springs. 



Northwestern Auto Co. 

K. A. Suadahl, Prop. 




hi SX^ttnti it tJtilL i'jgS i '^tiiis: •^■^ jr.'. -S- . 



».v*im&aaa^ 



°?^WSxi^^^^^R^^^ 



I 



Page Eight'/ 




H. A. Anfang, of Minneapolis, was. 
a business visitor in- this city Satur- 
day. 

. Miss Elizabeth. Johnson arrived in 
this city Saturday to ijpenil a few 
days visiting with her cousin Mrs. 
J. A. Smith. • ■ - 

.' Miss Henrietta Hogan, of Green- 
bush, arrived in ; this city Friday after- 
nodfr to spend a few days visiting 
with friends. 

Mrs. G.-Aruesou and S. Z. Arneson 
arrived in this city Friday evening 
fiom their home in: Barrett, . Minn., 
to visit for a period of two weeks at 
the L. Larson home.: 

Mrs. Anna Rowbefg returned to 
home in Crookston 'Saturday after- 
noon, after visiting with her sister, 
Mrs. C. X. Urdahl, of Goodridge, for 
the- period of one month. 

Sirs. George Johnson left Saturday 
afternoon for Fargo, N. D., where she 
will be the guest of: her sister, Mrs. 
Powell for a time. From there she will 
go to Bismarck, N. D., where she 
will visit for about two weeks. 

V. E. Polman, of ; this city left 
Saturday afternoon for Van Couver, 
B C. on a pleasure trip. He will be 
- gone about one month. 

Miss Clara Burud, who has been 
visiting with her sister, Mrs. Hans 
Olson, of this city, for the past three 
weeks returned to ■ her -home in 
Crookston on Saturday afternoon. 
Mr. and Mrs. Art Collins, who have 
. been visiting with friends and rela- 
tives in this city, returned to their 
home in Spokane, Wash., Saturday 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hoppe and- 

family returned to their, home in this 

■ city Saturday morning, after- visiting. 

with friends and relatives in Stephens 

Point, Wis., for about two weeks. 

T. Lederer, of Cleveland, Ohio, was 
a business visitor in this city on Sat- 
urday. . 

John Waxveck, of ; Grand Forks 
who is on his way to Chicago, visited 
over Smidny at the : Ole Ness home 
in this city. He left Sunday evening. 
John Berg of Karlstad was a busi- 
ness visitor in this city Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee and daughter, of 
Wannaska, were in ; this city over 
the week end visiting with friends 
and relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Warner, Miss 
Amy Krohn and Ted Hunt, of this 
city spent Sunday in Grygla. 

Miv Lund, of Karlstad, was a busi- 
ness visiror in this city Friday. 

Mrs. N. Berg and son, Elrie. left 
.Friday afternoon for Grand Forks, 
where they will visit • with friends 
for a few days. They will also at- 
tend the fair. 

F. C. Chandler, of Erskine, was in 
the city Monday attending to busi- 
. ness matters. 

Mrs. Herron spent Sunday in Vik- 
injr visiting with friends and rela- 
tives. . 
. Mi*, and Mrs. C. A. Ferguson, of 
Sacramento, California, passed thru 
this city Sunday on the Jefferson 
Highway enroute to Winnipeg, 

Mr. and Mrs. L; P. Jorgerson, of 
Oslo, were visiting friends and rela- 
-tives in this city over Sunday. 

Alf Krolin, who has! been employed 
in Aneta.' X. D., returned to his home 
in this city Tuesday.. He will re- 
main here indefinitely. 

Charles Prichard left for Union 
Lake Saturday where he spent the 
week end jvith friends. 

Mrs. James Farr, Jr., left Thurs- 
day afternoon, for a visit with her 
sister, Mrs. 0. P. Eingsby, at Grand 
Porks, N. D. ■ 

. Miss Violet Jennie, who has been a 
guest at the P. Engelstad home for 
the past eight days, returned to her 
home in Grand Forks, Thursday. . 

Richard Bergquist, of. Parkers Pra- 
rie, who has been a guest at the A_ 
. B. Miller home for the past few days, 
returned to his home Thursday. 

Miss Carrie Ellingson who has been 
visiting at the Peter Wold home near 
Highlanding, returned to her home in 



Miss 



C. S. 



Rugby N. D., Wednesday. 

En -oute to Devils Lake, Heimer 
Anderson, of Stanley, ftinn., spent a 
few ds ys in Oris city. While here he 
was tie guest of his brother, S. J. 
Andenon. 

Artt ur Bryant, who has been em- 
ployed in Superior, Wis., visited in 
this cily with friends and relatives 
over S uiday. From here he will go 
to Graid Forks. ■ 

Bon to Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Nason, 
Monday morning, July 26, a sfln.' 



Vivian Tripp, who has been 



visitius: for the past two weeks at the 



Simonson home, returned to 



her ho ne in Baudette Monday. 



and Mrs. A, Wangenstien, of 
ity left Monday morning for 



Mr. 
this ,ci 

Greenblish. where they wilt visit for 
some t me with friends and relatives. 

Edw ird Kiland left for Greenbush 
Mpnda/ to spend a week visiting 
with friends. 

Mrs. L. Johnson left Monday morn- 
ing for Holt where she will. visit for 
an ind 'finite period at the home of 
her parents. 

Mr. >nd Mrs. Miller of Brecken- 
ridge, i-ho have been visiting with 
the lat ers brother, Mr. . Provencher, 
ciiy left Sunday evening for 
rk. 



¥875.. tl'-'-.W •" 

These : car^oanjfiel^seen at the S! 
C. Parsons i Auto Co* Warren, Miring 



Classified Wants 



PAINTING AND PAPERHANGING, 
and interior decorating. First 
class] work. Prices reasonable. 
Bakkfen & Sherstad. phones 4943 
or 4lp. tf, 

WANTED— GERL FOR GENERAL 
houscjwork. Mrs. M. T. McFariand, 
307 Knight a^e. N. 38-tf 

FOR H E N T— ONE FURNISHED 
room.) -Telephone 515. 39-2pd 

FOR SALE — GOOD TEAM AND 
harness. Reasonable price. Ca'fl 
Mrs. J. J. Amble, 933 Horace ave- 
nue North. 2t 

LOST— | J27 HEAD OF EWES, ONE 
buck and 20 lanbs. Lambs all have 
i'ong tails and weigh from 75 to 
100 pounds. Ewes an have black 
face. Notify W. G Hamrick, An- 
gus, Minn. 39-tf 

FOR SALE— THRESHING OUTFIT 
compl jte for work. Reeves engine 
and I;eeves separator 36-60 with 
garden city wing feeder. Engine 
is a 40-80 gas tractor with 400 
gallon gas tank • [ounted on truck, 
S bottom; stuble plows, also brack- 
ers, a good outfit for someone that 
wants to go threshing. For par- 
ticulars write or call on me. B. J. 
Bakkc, Thief River Fai'.s, Minn. 

FOR RENT — IMPROVED FARM 
near sown. M. C. Harlow. 40-tf 

LOS T— MAROON AND GOLD 
sweat ?r hjetween Oen store and 
Red Bake Elevator. Leave at this 



office. 
FOUND- 



-SIDE CURTAIN 



40-1 
FROM 



big cs r on Jefferson highway in 
city. Owner may have same by 
paylnit for this add and calling at 
524 I iverside ave. and describing 
inrppeifty. tf 

HAY STUMPAGE ON SEVERAL 
quart! rs near Goodridge for rent. 
First & Peoples State Bank 35-tf 



USED CARS FOR SALE 

Buick Modal C. 25., overhauled, 
repainte I and new cord tires $700, 

Ford, late model, equipped with 
shock a >sorber and Yale ; lock ?450. 
Marion 
$300. 



delivery car, sacrifice price 
3mpire Speedster, 5 wire 



wheels, lew tires, a sacrifice at $800, 
Staud? tractor attachment for 
Ford. Brand new, pulls two plows, 
this attachment sells for $230. Our 
price for quick sale $130.00. 

Overland 75. Overhauled, "■ new 
batterieJ and a bargain at $475.00. 
Studebaker G, overhauled 1917 mod- 
el. Car (traveled 'less than 600 miles 



T 



The Lyceum 

Today and Wednesday 

D. W. GRIFFITH PRESENTS 



"The Idol 
Dancer 



With an all star cast aiic 

; Directed by himself 

Mr. Griffith claims this is 



oie 



Matinee Wednesday 
at 2:30 

A First-National Att- 



raction 



i ;£-V%h'*ty»**<\ : 




.99. 



personally 
of his best 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE 

'^fotice is hereby given that default 
has : beenr made hi the conditions of 
a mortgage given by ^ Bert O. Rois 
land and Belia Roisiaud, his wife. 
ro;flie Citizens State Bank of Hazel, 
(A Corporation, under tlie' laws of 
the State of Minnesota) , Moltgagee, 
da^tfa the 2nd day_of December, 1916 
and/ recorded in the. . office of ths 
Register of Deeds of Pennington 
County, Minnesota, on the 5th day 
of December, 1916, at eight o'clock 
A.' M., in Book Fifty-eight (58), of 
Mortgages, on page One Hundred 
Thirty-four (134), thereof. That 
the said Citizens State Bank of Ha- 
z<f .has paid the taxes assessed 
against the premises described in 
said mortgage for the years 1916, 
1917, 1918, and 1919, amounting 
in all to Two Hundred Ninety-six 
Dqli'ars, Forty-nine Cents ($296.49). 
That, the amount claimed to be due 
on said mortgage at this time, in- 
cluding said taxes, is One Thuosand 
Two Hundred Sixty-four Doli'ars 
Eighty-two cents ($1,264.82). That 
the premises described in and cover- 
ed by said mortgage are situated in 
Pennington County, Minnesota, and 
described as follows, to- wit: Lot= 
Two (2), Three (3), and Four (4), 
of Section Three (3), in Township 
One Hundred Fifty-two (152), 
North of Range Forty-one (41), 
West of the Fifth Principal Meridian, 
containing One Hundred Forty-five 
and Fifty-one Hundredths acres 
(145.51), more or iess, according to 
the Government survey thereof; that 
by virtue of the power of sale con- 
tained in said mortgage, ■ pursuant 
to" the statutes in such case made and 
provided, said mortgage will be fore- 
closed by the sale of said premises, 
at public vendue, to the highest bid- 
der, for cash, by the Sheriff of Pen- 
nington . County, Minnesota, at the 
East front door of the Pennington 
County Court House, in the City of 
TWef River Falls, Pennington Coun- 
ty, Minnesota, on the 11th day of 
September, A. D. 1920, at ten o'ci'ock 
A. M. of that day, to satisfy the 
amount then due on said mortgage; 
including said .taxes, together with 
the costs of such and Seventy rfije 
Dollars ($75.00) Attorney's fees, 
stipulated in said mortgage and fixed 
■y i'aw. 
Dated this 24th day of July 1920. 
Citizens State Bank of Hazel, 
Mortgagee. 
^ By Theo. Quale, 

Its Attorney. 
Theodore Quale, 

Thief River Fails, Minnesota, 
Attorney for Mortgagee. 
J 27-A 3-10-17-24-31 




A "National Necessity 



■■■•'■' : ^ 

SOME of you have heard something of the Real Machine we have in "The National" 
Shock Loader. We brought our shock loader with us for the purpose of showing you 
its real value, not only to the Farmers and Threshermen, but to humanity as a whole. 

Where it takes 12 teams and 12 teamsters and 3 men pitching bundles out of shocks, 
to handle a large standard threshing machine; the National Shock Load|r doing the same 
work, requires only 5 teamsters and 5 reamers and one erigirreer operatinj loader. "The 
National" not only picks the shocks from the ground, but doubly rakes the field at the same 
tune of all loose gram the machine passes over, both between and beneath the shocks. This 
means a saving of from one to two bushels per acre to the farmer, which is otherwise lost, 
and which often represents the only profit a farmer makes in grain. "The National" as a 
gram and labor saver will absolutely pay for itself in less than a 20 day run. 

... -?£° U y a " y oi y -° U farmers or Threshermen be willing to have us, on 
while, threshing any .kind of small grain, prove to you the statements we hay, 
be delighted to have you call on or notify us at the earliest possible moment 
hero only for a short time. 



aye made, we 



as we wil 



C H. HERMECKE and W. s D. 1 O'BRIEN 

at The Evelyn Hotels 
THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA 

NATIONAL SHOCK-LOADER CO. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 



your own 



fields 
will 
be 





&Fri 



JULY 29th and 30th 
• Lyceum Theatre 



The Elliott Film Corporation Presents 



The Worlds Greatest-Most Successful American Play 

COST $500,000.00 DA ™ .?™g^™™* 18,000 PEOPLE 



E 
V 
E 

N 
I 

N 
G 



8:15 P. M. 

PRICES: 

28c and 83c 

Tax Included 

3,000 HORSES 






M 






A 






T 






I 






N: 






E 






E 




2:30 P. M. 


PRICES: 


28c 


and 


55c 



Tax Included 



Accompanied By Their Own Musical Director .With 
Special Score 



5,000 SCENES 

And A Large Symphony Orc hestra 

^ Millions Have Seen It-andmiHotis Will See It Again and Again 
THE "MASTER CRAFT" of "FILM PERFECTION" 
7: 



Owing to the limited nuMer pf seats, it is requested that children attend the 
■y?^ Matinee Performance 



L.iWScsl^sStafclEft',* 



IMS§m$$^MM&M&^i 







-...I.. 




VOI . 20 No. 41 



*W.WlJfc 




is sold 
raise. 



HORSE RACING A; 

PROGRAM ANP 
" INTEREST 7 ' ! 



<**■, 



by the 
ducted 



(eyai 



1 

i 

i 

[ 
\ 

■ I 

i 

j 

) 
I 

| 


. ■ 



New' and interesting features are 
being added each day for the Pen- 
nington County Fair which opens on 
"Wednesday of next week and which 
holds forth for three (lays with 
•evening programs. Harness racing is 
--■one' of the main attractions that hav$ 
been added for the; second and third 
-days of the_falr. : The pacers wn$ 
are -to participate in the races are 
owned by Mrs. H. : M. _ Bryan and 
; were the winners of large purses in 
the races at the Grand Forks fair 
which closed, last week. The horses 
are booked for the; Iowa State Fair 
to be held atDes Moines, and this 
fact alone is enough to insure good 
horses and exciting races. The 
horses making up the stable, together 
with their time is as follows: Lottie 
Elssell, 2:11%; < Flying Paehen, 
2:17% ; Snider BUI green; Midnight, 
2 :24%.- Mrs. Bryan is/the only lady 
driver appearing on the track and 
will drive one of the entries in each 
race. Lovers of hofse racing ' are 
sure to get their money's worth from 
this feature alone and it is believed 
-*this attraction will prove to be a big 
•drawing card;. The officials for the 
racing are as follows: ; 

Br. G. A. Penny SiiptJ and starter. 
A.. H. Akre,; Judge . ' . 
Daniel Shaw, Judge 
Wilhelm Michelet, Timer 
F. J, Stebbins, Timer 
■The Minnesota Grain Inspection 
Department is to have .an exhibit in 
the Farm Products building and will 
demonstrate to all interested the 
present method now ' employed in 
grain grading.: This will prove ex- 
ceptionally Interostng to the farmers 
of the county as grain grading is 
'highly important audi means consid- 
erable. to the man who leaves the 
grading of his' grain to others after 
he has put iu the crop and has done 
all the work tb get the grain to 
market. This Iwill without question 
prove to be a point of; interest and 
will draw large" numbers each day of 
the fair. j . . " 

N.- J.. Holmberg,. commissioner of 
agriculture of the sfiitei of Minnesota, 
will attend the *iir On August 5th 
aud will give an address relating to 
the operations of his department 
which is a iiewj department of the 
ttate government. 

Holstein-Friesian breeders will be 
interested in learning that their as- 
sociation is offering $30 in prizes to 
be competed for at the fair and an 
•invitation, has been extended to the 
? entire county to enter a herd at the 
state fair for the large and attrac- 
tive prize money offered for this 
class at the state, fair.; 

Everything is; progressing as well 
as could be expected and the fab- 
board fee that they will be able to 
present a fair this year that wlU.do 
credit to the county and one which 
will meet with' the entire approval 
of the public. 



THta^ER-^LSI, MINNESOTA.; lipDAY; ^l/t^ 30, 1920; 



no money is advanced until the wool 
" " as it willbe held until prices 
In many places where wool 
growerfe need the money local banks 
are ad 1-aneiug a percentage on the 
y.nlue \f the wool. This is. the most 
way of forcing the . larger 
to ayers to pay . a - reasonable 
f >r wool and ■ if. all wool growers 
filter he pool there is; little doubt 
that p ices will advance soon. 

Frei| ;ht need' not be : prepaid 
wool shipments as it will be paid 
'"• """ Warehouse Company, and de' 
from returns. 



Official Paper of 'Pennington County 




.':-. S. . ;.-c-T^7 'if::." ■ ■' .W-* >.'.-'tf\;.f. • ^-v --. - 



New Boy Arrives 

' Mr. hnd Mrs. Edw. : Osgood, of 
Bray township, arc entertaining a 
new eight pound boy which was born 
to then on Wednesday of this week. 



BOOSTERS TO 
WARROADHIT 
TOUGH ROADS 



PARTI 



ARRIVES AT END OF«TBK 
TOUR ONE HOUR BEHIND 
THEIR SCHEDULE / 



The jooster trip to Warroad and 
return nade by the fair boosters of 
Perininf ton county last Tuesday is 
a matt( r of history and the final 
lap of t le journey was completed this 
morhipi by several who made the 
boat trft) to Kenora, Canada. 



Goiut 



one hoi r behind schedule and due 



to the 



1 ad roads arrived in Karlstad 



two ho irs behind schedule, having 
t that place at 2:30. , The 



lunch a. , „.. _.„„. , j.,^ 

party left Karlstad at 3:15 and had 
excellen rpnds from there to Warroad 
arriving in Warroad at 7 o'cock just 
one hot r behind schedule. Supper 
was en j i.ved and the party then took 
advmitn re of boat trips on the Lake 
of the Y 'oods. A .dance was arranged 
for the party and a great ninny at- 
tended t lis dance until the wee small 
hours. Early iii the morning n con- 
sidrable portion of the. party left on 
the boat for Kenora and as a resuit 
the tour was badly split up and those 
who did not take the boat trip re- 
turned 1 oinc in straggling numbers. 
No atteupt was. made to follow the 
schedule from Warroad on the re 
turn trii and the towns that were 
to have been visited' oh the trip 
home w re passed thru-liy the ears 
one at » time anywhere from thirty 
minutes apart to a day. This is tb 
be regrelted as the nature' of .the trip 



was^ to 
fair and 



ie strictly boosting for the 
the fact that so many of 



the towns were passed up on the re- 



turn trip 
value of 



Karist id, Badger and ' Greenbush 
treated the party in royal style and. 
made th< in feel perfecty at home and 
left the impression that they were 
g'.ad to ee them. Roseau- sent a 
delegatioi to Fox to meet .the party 
but owirfe to the fact that the, tour 
Wns beh nd schedule, the ' delegation 
returned to Roseau arid waited for 
the party to arrive. 



TO POOL ALL 
COUNTY'S WOOL 
AT CHICAGO 



WOOL OF THE COUNTY TO 
SHIPPED TO CHICAGO 
AUGUST 9th AND 10th 



BE 



: At a meeting of the wool growers 
in Thief River Falls- on July 23, it 
f'-was dpcided to pool the: county wool 
with the National Wool Warehouse 
in Chicago. This is an .organiza- 
tion of wool growers who will hold 
Jthe wool from one to .five months 
at a cost of three cents per pound 
which • covers the grading, storage, 
Insurance and all other risks. Mr. W. 
A. McKerrow of University Farm is 
handling all wool ; shipped from 
Minnesota at a cost not to exceed 
one-half cent a pound.' This will 
make the total about three and oner 
half cents on each pound. 

The committee in : Pennington 
county - decided to ship on August 9 
and 10 so' all wool should be brought 
in to Thief River or Goodrldge on 
those days. : i ' '-' 

Each sack should be labeled with 
the name of the grower, | the address, 
number of sacks; itiipped by each 
man and the weight of ^vobl in each 
sack. This should be •painted .on with 
• black paint or lampj.biack, for ex- 
ample: John Brown jhad two.' sacks 
weighing two hundred j and, fifty' 
pounds each would . jbeilettered. as 
•follows: .•■'■• ■; | .';'!';' ■ ' ' ■.':■■'- 
■■" John BroSvn, ■ ■'! '-'-('.."' -j ■ ,"| '/.-v..':--; 

Thief River Falls, Minn! 
, S.,2. W. 250!b.|; '": ' ■ .. 

As this is a co-operative' movement 
.'■-..;.. . •-. ■; , I... V'l'i.i,-v'; '''•'<■ ; ; .- ':.:'■■ 



;* 



Those 
are hard 



assertion 
display 
which he 
biggest 
in this 



with Joe 




AWARDS WILL BE ANNOUNCED JUST AS SOON 
.AS JUDGES FINISH COUNir— FLOOD OF SUB- 
.'<:•' SCRIPTIONS MARK END OF RACE 



'■The Judges 

Chas. Vorachek, Citizens State 

Bank 

Willis Akre, First Nat'l ; bank. 

Scott Laird, Laird's Specialty 

Shop. 



up the party left this city 



The greatest race for prizes ever 
conducted in Northern Minnesota 
and one of the most interesting cam- 
paigns of years, will close at eight 
o'clock Saturday night when The 
Tribune will distribute to winners 
prizes aggregating $3,600. 

For two months workers have 
kept on- with constant eadeavors tb 
necure subscriptions and thus votes 
in the great race, Will your shrp 
come in on Saturday? Is the out- 
come of The Tribune's race for prizes 
going to be favorable to youV 

If your,test efforts' have made a 
deep channel for the progress of your 
ship of fortune, then you can feel 
reasonably certain thai iiicsra will be 
no shoals to founder or distress it. 
On the other hand, if you do not 
behold one of the rich' prizes in your 
possession after the winner? are 
.iniiounced, it may be due to your 
lack of proper hustle during the time 



that remains behveei now .md Sat- 
urday night. 

•Would you feel saMsiiod to. lose 
Cut by a few thousand votes if you 
ki\ew that the candidate- ahead * of 
you had secured the majority over 
you during the last hours of rhe 
race? You certainly would nor. and 
it is -for this reason that your candi- 
dacyshonld tit tills time be better 
supported aud pushed to its conclu- 
sion than on any day so far. 

The votes to be obtained by turn 
ing in subscriptions will ninke yon 
a winner, but the Tribune cannot do 
the work of securing them for you, 
«xcept to offer you the best publica- 
tion in this part of the country. 
When they give you that, their 
power to bring in subscription ceases. 
The further appeal must be made by 
you in your, own way. If your friends 
need persuasion before they can be 
enlisted in your cause it is up to you 
tb do the persuading. Don't wait 
for any trick of fate to bring the 
subscriptions to you. You've got to 
go out and get them. You know 
what the chances are for being re- 
turned a winner if you work, and 
what they are if you don't work. 
Make the last hours count in your 
favor by turning each moment into 
votes and victory! 



. Information Wanted 

Postmaster John Morgan has sev- 
eral letters addressed to former ser- 
vice men from the government and 
as he does not know their present 
address he will appreciate it very 
much if the men or those who know 
of their whereabouts will inform him 
as to where the mail should be sent. 
He is holding letters addiessed to 
Charles Getland. Julius A. Kramer, 
Albert M. Ekhlom and Henrv Olson 
care of Frank Olson. The letters are 
from the war department, treasury 
department and the navy department 
and Postmaster Morgan is very anx- 
ious to see them delivered. If you 
happen to know the address of any 
of these men he will appreciate any 
information concerning their where- 
abouts: 



GRAIN IS NOW 
BEING CUT IN 
ALL SECTIONS 



YIELD SO FAR IS EXCEPTION- 
ALLY FINE AND FARM- 
ERS ARE OPTIMISTIC 



does not add greatly to the 
the tour. 



COMMERCIAL 
CLUB TO RAISE 
FUNDSFORBAND 



BACK PAYMENTS NOW DUE THE 
BAND TO BE RAISED IN 
SHORT ORDER • 



The merchants and business men 



FORTY-FIVE 
ARE EXAMINED 
HERESATURDAY 



CHILD CLINIC LAST SATURDAY 

CLAIMED TO BE BEST HELD 

IN THE STATE 



i A. very successful child clinic was 



of the city are soon to be approached ' h'ft.MTln the city audtoriuiu at' Thief 
by a special ^committee of the Com- River Fails on July 24. Of the 
mercial Clubwho are to raise funds, forty-live chldreii thntwere examin 



The ttur was very enjoyable and 
all had a most peasant time and 
aside fro n the fact that the schedule 
was brol en on the return trip, the 
tour was a success and accomplished 
its missitn. '.'■', 



Hog Raisers Get Busy 
n the county who figure they 
to beat when it comes to 
raising Hogs are going to be given 
an opporl unity to show just what they 
really cai do when it comes to produc- 
Joe bski, of Mavie, recently 
what he claims to be the 
fattest ai d largest porker ever raised 
in the co inty and as evidence of his 
and belief he is going fb 
slab of pork ait the fair 
claims will come from the 
t nd fattest hog ever raised 
; ection. The fair manage^ 



ment ha e entered into, the, matter 



in earnest and have placed 



five dollfrs as a prize for the man 
who can show that he has raised a 
fatter at i bigger hog than the one 
raised by Mr. Oski. It is felt that 
this will give the fanners : an oppbr- 
tunity to show what ability they pos- 
sess m tl is line and if th^y have an 
idea that they can produce anything 
as good or better than ' the exhibit 
to be dis ilayed by Mr. Oski, the fair 
next wee £ will give, them their op- 
portunity 



Booths Going Up" 

Fifteen booths for the use of local 
merchant i in the auditorium during 
fair weel :are practicaily ^completed 
and will je turned oyer to the'mer--. 
chants bj the fair association to use 
as they •■--*«- 

part of 
the fair 
tibn with 



see best. The -booths are 

t ie iridustrial program that 

oard is. ho'.ding iii conjunc- 

the f air and due?to lact of 

proper h< usmg- facilities "at the' fair 



grounds t lie. auditorium is to ; be nsed' 
for the p lrpose. The fancy work 
and art < xhiblt is. also to ;be housed 
in the au Iitoriiini''^V.W'dl-^s.M;he';ex*^ 
hibits fro n the schools of the oouhty> 
This is si re to be ah .attractive,' place, 
during -tb 3 falr'-jind^will drW-manst 
visitors." v',' . ' ,"• :\ iJ.*, ,- '.",■ -j 



to pay off the members of the band 
for services rendered during 1919. 
This committee is composed of E; M. 
Bennes, chairman, Roy Lambert, W. 
W. Prichard, "Jr., John Morgan ami 
Theo. Quale, they having been named 
at the annual meeting of the club Feb 
13, 1919. 

The local band has at times been 
worthily applauded for its efforts and 
when away from home Jhas made a 
record of .: which all oi the citizens of 
Thief-River Falls have been proud. 
In anticipation of continuing the band 
thrubutjlas't. year the club authorized 



Grain cutting in all sections of the 
county is now under way and the 
yield generally is all that could be 
asked for and the farmers are feel- 
ing mighty good over the crop, out- 
look. The rye is yielding in splend.id 
manner and it is felt that with good 
weather from now on that all crops 
will take on the saine showing and 
that the county in general will have 
a mighty bright and interesting fu- 
ture, to look forward to this fall. The 
small grain is yielding as well or 
better than it has for many years 
and every ludicntioii'points'to a won- 
derful oujlook in this section. 

Haying is praeticully completed 
and .'there is feed in plenty for the 
stock of this section and some to 
spare. With every thing on the boom 
it looks us if Pennington county 
was going to be able to put it over 
in the matter of production and 
yield in great shape and far liett 
than the average section, taking the 
state as a whole. This of course 
not disappointing to any and the 
farmers least of all, and within the 
course of a few weeks the prosperity 
of this county will be manifested in 
the harvesting of one of the biggest 
crops on record. 



HEALTH CLOWN 
TO BE HERE 
DURING Ik I R 



AMUSING ANTICS OF CLOWN TO 

BE FEATURE OF THE 

HBrtLTH EXHIBIT 



Ho-Co Arc. of the An' Health 
Clown Family, the jolliest family in 
the Northern Division of the Red 
Oro<s, will be in Thief Riyor Falls 
on August, nth and (Ith when he will 
tell the children. how to grow as 
strong as he is. [. . 

The Are Health' Oloiyn Family arc 
the most highbrow .uielnbers of 'their 
profession in the 4!io\v business this 
season. They not only know, the 
technique of falling down, walking 
on their hands, funny noises, laugh,' 
getting patter and sl'ap stick, but- 
they are child welfare specialists 
and nutritional' exports. They parade 
the fair grounds like circus Pied 
Pipers luring a Uirong of children 
Into the Red Cross booth to be 
weighed and tagged. Thru their 
comical antics they arouse iii chil- 
dren the feeUng that inimical and 
spinich and, milk are more de-irable ■ 
than lollipops' and cliewius gum, 
that toothbrushing and bathing arc 
a lark and that ripe bananas, i-reen 
cucumbers and pickles ■ are dietetic 
vices to be shunned. 

Clown training enures were es- 
tablished in the Northern Division 
of the lted Cross :o 'hat every grad- 
uate, clown would ne jiiduii.ini in 
the rudiments of his profession.. 
Red Cross peace projects. public 
health keeping clinical records, opi- 
doinio'ogy. children's diseases, nu- 
lition. home service, pul.ll^r'y and 
building vf Red Cross exhibits am 



its 



the 



clowii 



ed very few showed physicaldefects. 
Dr. Pearce of St. Paul represeutbig 
the Minnesota Public Health Asso- 
ciation stated that this was one of 
the best clinics that he had ever held. 
Parents of the children showing de 
fective eyes, ears, tonsils or adenoids 
are advised to consult their family 
physcians as soon as possble that 
these defects may be remeded. These 
clinics are held in cooperation with 
the Pennington County Public 
Health Association all work being 
donefree of charge to those who 
bring iu children to be examined. 



+h. n ~-.~:«.-><.„ «... i • The expense of the examining phv- 

SSr^f**' °T • f i *" ,g aT ~ f set™ '» PaMby the local association 
rangenpnte for^the mamtenance of . from tlle j^ TaMna - ttom the 

S ^ er If ^ «.• -' U ,e of Red Cross Seals last Decern- 
ohortly'after that meeting the com- ' oer 

mittee raised part of the funds and 



. Receives High Position 

Mrs. Manley L. Foseen, member, of 
the national, republican executive com- 
mittee, has been appointed joint chair- 
man of the national speakers bureau, 
with Senator Harry's. New of Ind- 
iana, it was announced today. Mrs. 
Foseen ws honor guest at a luncheon 
given i n Chicgo yesterday by the rep- 
ublican women, with whom she was in 
conference. This new, duty means 
that Mrs. Foseen will spend much of 
her time in Chicago from now until 
the November election at the nation- 
al republican headquarters. 



I he dootor 
linic, giv- 
ictua! and 
un's Hke- 
liira as a 
tio are le- 



sonie of the 
curriculum. 

Record cards, tilled by 
and nurse conducting the 
in? the child's name. age. 
ideal weiglil. bear la. el. 
ness and are signed by 
souvenir to the. c'hildivn w 
ijuested to turn them in t. 
•'ehnol muse in the fab. Th- 

keeps a duplicate ivi I. whl 

lises for intensive v.-ork with | 
in eases which need special all 

The An-. Health Clown 1-.hi 
having a hilarious rei-ejuin.ti 
ever members put on their 
l-lducators. physicians, psych 
ami parents have indorsed the 
ment. whiHi is a development 
Child Health .Organization ido 
canse it inculcates health standards 
iu children thru the play instinct in 

a way which insures tic c peration 

and interests of 4ioys ami girls. 



i the* 
nurse 
■h she 
a routs 
•Mtiniir . 
lily is 
\vher- 
stunt. 
I'ogist 
move_ 
of Llie 
a. he- 



Fast Ball Game 



GONVICK MEETS THE LOCAL 

BALL TEAM AT THIS PLACE 

NEXT SUNDAY 



then secured a donation from the city 
council. There the matter rested until 
now a bill: has' been presented for the 
remainder of the balance due the 
band. To properly dispose of the 
account it becomes necessaryfor the 
committee to collect the deficiency 
and they will be calling on those who 
want a band and'who wish to donate 
for its services. . ' ■ ' 



Judging Contest 

A dabTT judging contest will be 
held on the second day of tbe fair, 
August 5th,. at 10 a,. m. Any bo? 
or girl between the ages of 10 and 
18. may take-paitv The state live 
stock breeders and the Pennington 
County Fair Association are offering 
liberal prizes as. well as a free trip 
to the live vstbek" show at south St. 
Paul for theV three highest winners. 
" All contestants who plan on enter- 
ing should' leave, their names at the 
Farm Bureau office hot later than 
August 2.'- 



Home Grown Tomatoes 

Henry Hadrath is the first in Pen- 
nington county ' to report new toma- 
toes. Mr. Hadrath -informs The 
Tribune--. that he is now .dining '.off 
new tomatoes . but bf-hls own garden 
and that instead of seating the hot 
house, varlbty all that Vis ■ neoessaij' 
is for- hici tb walk into the "garden, 
and .help himself J . This is" indeed a" 
record -that ■'; wUl' Ve hard ; to ■ 'equal 
andsq far.as^e have been able'-lo 
learnt theke-'are'the first ihoine grown 
tomaitoesHhat'ha've'been-pi^utedJn 
the'sc'bun'ty: Or 1 for that matter' the 
entocnorffiwesfc-M - -'•- -. ■ ■'< I 



.' Swedish Ev. Mission Church;- ' 
Services nextSunday as follows: 
;Snndpy sc>opt;ati r 10:'a:" m. Service 
'at-'^l? "HHaire'' at .east 'side school' 
house- at i6:30'-'a^in: Black River 
at? S: arid ^t'iSt,\Hilalre at 8 .p.:m. 
'.Com'e.;finjJ;Jj^g^yoW; ~"~~ 

ar^'ordjoj^ynvitedj'"^? ; — '■' ." 



Ybu 



SEASON TICKETS 

Season tickets for the fair 
are being issued by the 
Secretary G. Howard Smith, 
and he wishes Ho announce 
that the tickets are good for 
any member of the family 
for both afternoon and eve- 
ning programs. The tickets 
sell for $2.00 .and a great 
many have purchased the 
season ticket in order to 
save time at the gates and to 
be enabled to attend all pro. 
grams of the fair at a sav- 
ing. Those desiring season 
tickets may secure them 
from the secretary. 



UNCLAIMED LETTERS 

The following is a list of the un- 
claimed letters held at the Thief 
River Falls, Minn., post office for the 
week ending July 14, 1920. If .not 
called for within two weeks from the 
above date they will be sent to the 
Dead Letter Branch, Chicago, Dl. 

: Buck, Mr. OJe 
. Faaborg, Mrs.- Simon 
''■ Flnsand, Ole P. 

Holo, Mr;' 
' Johnson, Miss Marie 

Krohn, Mr. Arne 
, Mainard, Q. B. 

Smith, Frank . ' . 
:Tvet, Mr. Ole B. 
• Wanzer, Mrs.. C. J. 

When calling for the above letters 
please state that they -were adver- 
tised., ■:■-.■. -. .--. '•'.' :' 
r . ■ John Morgan, p. M. 



' Zion Lutheran Church .. 

;. Services, at 11 a. m. Service at 
Norden 2:30 p. m. Service 8 p. m. 
Sunday school 10 . a. ; mi Rihdal 
ladies aid at Rosewood Tuesday, Aug. 
ust 3, at. Mrs. Jarsaw.'s. Prayer 
meeting Wednesday evenings in Zlbn 
church.' ■..•■- ' v - , . 



Here Tomorrow 



ST. PAUL BOOSTERS DUE 
CITY TOMORROW MORN. 
NING AT 7:45 



IN 



Next Saturday is the (late when 
the St. Paul Boosters arrive in the 
city in full force and they are coming 
in a special train acompanied by the 
Minnesota State band, which will give 
a concert on the" streets of the city 
shortly after, the party anves. 

The party are making a tour of the 
northwest and will arrwe in this city 
on Saturday morning next at 7:45 
a. m. They will remain here for one 
hour anil forty five minutes and they 
assure every resident of the city and 
county a good time when. they pull 
into town. Souvenirs are to be given 
the children and a community sing- 
ing contest will also be' conducted* 
prizes being given to the boy and girl 
singing the best and loudest. 

The tour is made in the interests 
of the manufacturers and jobbers or 
St. Paul and the party will make it 
a point to call on all the business men 
of the city and become acquainted 
while here. A committee has been 
selected to meet the boosters and to 
show them a good time while here. 
F. H. Herrick, of the Thief River 
Grocery Company, is chairman of the 
committee and it goes without saying 
that he will deliver the goods as he 
always does when it comes to enter- 
tainment. 

The boosters are composed of manu- 
facturers of St. Paul and this is their 
second tour this summer. The first 
tour was made thru the Dakotas and 
Montana and the party made a record 
for themselves while on this tour and 
gathered in much new business as 
a result. The purpose of the tour is 
to become better acquainted with the 
trade territory and to incidentally 
boost for St. Paul. 




hall 

d for 

1st. 



One of the most interesting 
games of the season is schedul. 
next Sunday afternoon. Angus 
when the team from (ionvick comes 
to this city to meet the local team.. 
The Gonrh-k organization are com- 
posed of salaried men and it. is claim-, 
ed that the Thief River team is to be- 
taken to a cleaning ami a good one 
when the fionvick team appears. The 
local organization tire not one bit 
alarmed over the outcome and fcol 
that they will he able to give (Ion- 
vick all they are looking for with a 
few .extra thrills thrown in on the. 
side. Three new men are to be added 
to the lineup for Sunday's game and 
the manager feels that this will ma- 
terially strengthen the home team to 
such an extent that they will be able 
to cope with the best that Gonvick 
is able to offer and as a result he in 
shape to hand them all they want and 
give them a run for their money. 

Gonvick boosters state it will take 
a regular ball team to defeat their 
organization, but the locals are con- 
fident that they are capable of meet- 
ing the Gonvick team in full force 
and will 'be -able to handle the best 
they can produce. 

It is expected that the game on 
Sunday will draw a large crowd as 
both teams - are standing exception- 
ally well at the present time and it is 
certain that; both will do all in their 
power to win. This is the last game 
before the. tournament that is to be 
played at the fair grounds during 
the fair and should pull a good at- 
tendance. 



Moves To City 
E. W. Hinrichs, manager of^ the 
new Penney store that is to open in 
this city August first, moved his 
family over : froni Crookston Tuesday 
of this week and the family are com- 
fortably located in their new home 
at 914 Duluth avenue north. Mr. 
Hinrichs is busy remodeling the 
rooms the new tirm are to occupy and 
states that with good luck- the new 
store will be open to the pubic as an- 
nounced. '. 



ar«T*«ir«A 



Page Two 




Mr. and Mi-s. Elg and family mo- j Miss 
tared to Roseau Sunday to spend the rived in 
day visiting with friends. j to visit 

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Pratt motored j Holland, 
to Itasca State Park on Saturday to Ruth 
splnd Sunday at the Lodge. j Snturda; • 

Oscar O. Gran of Rugby, N. D.,| they wi 
has been visiting for a few days' at i ltev. A. 
the home of his brother, Emil Gran, j E. J. 
He reports the" crops in North Da- j called t( 

iota as being very good, and was I see. his cither who was reported very 
highly pleased with the conditions of j ill. 
things in this vicinity. | Mr. and 

Henry Blankenburg, of Henry, S. ; family, JUrs. 
D-, spent a few days in this city ! and Mil 
looking after his interests at this' day at Maple 'Lake. 
p] aee ! Leland C. Schuster, Er 

O. C. Hanson returned Sunday ! and Ro.-mw Bakke returned^ Sunday 
morning from Minneapolis and also ; from Gij 



Mrs, 
Can., an 



Mrs. 
i Sunday 



; daughter 
j few day 




THE TRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JULY 30,1920 



Iara 'Knutson, of "Warren, ar. 

this city Saturday • evening 

for a few days with Mrs. J. 

r , 

md Beatrice Sandum left 
evening for Erskice where 
visit for a week at the 
. Skogerboe home. 
Richards of this city was 
Red Lake Falls Saturday to 



ml Mrs. L.- J. Rolland and 
F. Hoppe and children, 
Clara Knutson spent Sun- 

rnest Barzen 
rned Sunday 
and Forks where they had 



WITH BOOSTERS 



. Chicago, 



meetni 
izing the 
"We 'I 
consider,' 
main one 
grain int 



their 
ufaeturcr 
grain in 
evs will 
than the 
that we 



Watertown, S.D., where he had been 
on a business trip. 

Miss Margaret Wilkinson, who has 
been visiting for the past two weeks, "<"S to 
with Miss Agnes Tandberg- of this' flves fo 1 
city, returned to her home at Red 
Lake Falls Thursday. 

Misses Clara' Brigand, of Ehoda, 
and. Ida Arveson and Oscar Knutson 
of Fisher, visited friends at High- 
landing Sunday. j 

Mr. and Mrs. Hreiand and Alfred; 
knutson, of Rhcda. motored to Foss- ; 
ton Sunday. ! 

Mis s Mary Hei'ie was a guest at j 
the Syr.veit' home last Sunday. | 

Julius Jetka and family motored j 
over from Little Falls the first of i 
the week on a pleasure trip. __ Mr. | 
Jetka completed the sale of a piece, 
of land in the western part of the! 
county at the same ;time. ! 

0. N. Urdahl, of Goodridge, passed 
thru here Saturday with two cars of 
cattle which he Ms taking to the St. 
Paul market. Mr. Urdahl is one of the 
most progressive stock farmers in the 
county. . 1 ; , 

W. W. Barr accompanied by Mr. 
Wycker, of Clarion, ilowa, arrived on 
Friday by auto. MrJ Ban: purchased 
a tactor and is doing some summer 
plowing ori his newly acquired farm 
in Numedahl township. ' 

J. A. Dahl and son Levi of Hazel 
were in this city o n Monday attending 
to business. 

Miss Violet 'Brown of . Grygla Is 
spending the week visiting at ~tne 
home of her brother, F. A. Brown. 

Miss Rose Gunstad of St. Hilaire 
was among the out of town shoppers 
in this city on Monday. 

Mrs. A. 01so n of ithis city left on 
Monday afternoon for Perley, Minn., 
where she will visit; for an indefinite 
period with friends. ■ . 
: Mrs. P. E. Estnsori, of Climax, who 
has bee n visiting at jthe E. Heigeland 
home for the past few days, left for 
her home on Monday. 

Mrs. Knut Melby|of this city left 
for Twin Valley on Monday afternoon 
where she will visit! with friends. 

Miss Christine Newton, who has 
been attending the NormafSchool at 
Bemidji, returned to; her home in this 
city Monday. 

Miss Alta Hellanil arrived in this 
city on Monday evening to spend a 
few days visiting with Miss Gladys 
Anderson. 

Miss Theone Walker left Saturday 
evening for St. Paul; where she is em- 
ployed, j 

Misses Durah and Loretta Kelly 
of Mahnomen visited in this city one 
day with their cousin, Edward Kelly, 
eni-oute to Conway, N. D., where they 
will spend an indefinite period visit- 
ing friends and relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edw. Larson of this 
city motored to Roseau to spend the 
week-end visiting with friends ami 
relatives. 

Miss Beatrice Dale returned to her 
home in Mcintosh after spending a 
few days in this city visiting with 
her sister, Mrs_ J. N. Nesse. 

Mrs. Helen Montgomery visited at 
the home of her sister, Mrs. Wm. 
Murphy, of Crookston, between trains. 
Tuesday. i 

Mrs. R. L. Thuse and son left on 
Wednesday morning for Gatzke to 
visit for some time jwith Mrs. Thuse's 
parents. 

Misses Laura Wold of Higlilanding 
and Carrie Ellingson of Rugby, N. D. 
were guests at the S. J. Anderson 
home a few days last week. 

Miss Karen Kmitsbn returned lo 
this city Sunday ;nfter spending a 
week visiting in Fargo. 

Mrs. .13. A. HCrraanson and chil- 
dren returned to their home In Min- 
neapolis Monday after visiting ten 
days at. the H. Hermanson home. . 

Gusten Berglund left Monday for 
Climax where he : is employed. 

Miss Ruth Evenscn returned to her 
home in this city '■■ Monday morning 
for a short visit . Miss Evenson is 
employed in CrookSLon. 

Mrs. A. Breudigan of Crookston 
h.s been visiting for the past week 
at the J. S. Burnett home. 

Mrs. W. D. R'uigert, and Mrs. E. 
- Kolp were among: the' out of town 
shoppers in this city Saturday. 

Mrs. F. Hoppe; and children, of 
Bemidpi. arrived in this city Satur- 
day evening to visit for an ndefiniter 
-- period at tile J. LJ npirand home. 

Alpha and Judith Skogerboe, who 
have been visiting for the past few 
days at the Gilbert Sandum home, 
returned to their liomc in Erskine 
Saturday evening. , ' 

Mrs. Tliyra Snyder left Saturday 
evening for Detroit, where she will 
spend Sunday at jthe lake*, visiting 
with •friends. J ; 

F. J. Hoycz, of Warroad, was a 
business visitor in this !city Saturday. 



been attending the fair. 



i. Anderson, of Stockholm, 
ived in this city Sunday eve- 
visit with freinds and rela- 

about one minth. 
Favrow, of this city, left 

evening for Minneapolis 



where she will be the guest of her 



Mrs. James Dibble for a 



BODY SEEKS 



OE 



STABILIZING CONDITIONS THRU 
CO-OPERATIVE ORGANIZATION 
■ IS OBJECTIVE IN VIEW 






July, 22. — Plans for the 
marketing of grain and live stock 
witl be formulated by the American 
Farm Bureau federation in a two-day 
conference which opens here tonior- 
raw. Dejejates representing farmers' 
eo-up9rative organizations through- 
out the country, 'suite farm bureaus, 
state grain dealer;.' associations,' 
farmers' unions and state granges are 
expected.] 

The meeting is the result of sev- 
eral conferences held by the Middle 
West grain marketing group. J. R. 
Howard, I president of the American 
Farm Bureau federation, called the 



lor the purpose of national- 
new marketing system, 
ave two or three piaiis to 
' Mr. Howard said, "but the 
is to organize the local 
?rests into an overhead or- 
anizatio 1. making it possible for the 
wheat g *owers to have control of 
ra n until it reaches the man- 
We hope to ' market our 
such a way that the grow- 
lave a -stable market rather 
feast and famine' system 
iow have. 




"PONY EXPRESS" 

. .Xew York Evening Post: An in- 
teresting relic of other diys turned 
up in Washington not so long ago in 
sen-: in the pony express days .by a 
merchant in St. Louis to his agent 
in San Francisco. This letter has 
reference to the disposal of a lot of 
goods that. were shipped by Way of 
Cape Horn and a!,ho it contained 
several thousand words and a copy of 
an invoice it was written on just two 
sheets of paper. 

The paper itself is a sort of tough 
opaque tissue, very thin and slight. 

When folded the letter slips easily 
into an ei.velope three inches wide. 

The reason why this communica- 
tion was prepared' in such a peculiar 
way lies in the stamp attached, one 



of the old "pony express" series, with 
a design of a man on horseback spur- 
ring at a gallop across the plains 
We' all know, of course, that the 
Pacific mail of that period was car- 
ried by relay riders, but few of the 
present generation have any idea oi : 
the. great pain s tiiat were taken to 
reduce its weight to a minimum. The 
letters were stored in little flat 
pmiches under the flaps of the sad; 
die. and they were usually written on 
a specia'ly prepared tissue. The one 
referred to must have occupied an 
expert cork several days, for the 
penmanship is minute. It is, however, 
beautifully executed, clear and leg- 
ible. 

The stamp was of the denomina- 
tion of 50 cents. 



Wm. J. BRCJWN 

Lawyer. 

Formerly County Attorney 
Alarshal! County ■ 

Office Over First National iJank' 
Thief Rner Falls, Minnesota 



\ 



THEO QUALE 

Lawyer 

Practice in all Courts and &** 

fore U. S. Land Office 

McGinn Building 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 



At tin 
conferew 



If the 
omically 
s qua re li 



> ci'ose of the grain men's 
e at Ames, Iowa, a few 
weeks aio, a committee of nine was 
selected from the various, state farm 
to study co-operative mar- 
keting system in Canada^ The 
committte will make a report at .the 
convention. 

farmers wiU organize econ- 
they will be able to get a 
eal in the markets. They 
never wi I get a square deal' till they 
do orgai ize. Every farmer in the 
Northwest should be a member of a 
marketiu * association, political or. 
ganizatic a is a debatable remedy, but 
market in 5" associations are unques- 
tionably good. 



W.SWEDENBERG 

P lysician and Surgeon 

Eyes listed and Glasses Supplied 

Spi cial Attention Paid lo 

EyesJ, Ears, Nose and Throat 

Phone 350 
First National Bank Building 



"mm 

I^Mornin: 



KeepYoiir Eytes 

£'°^ff -Clear .-* Healthy. 
Wit. Fatl hEACm Book Miuin* Co^OucagAUU. ' 



\ 




DAN E. WEIGLE 
Secretary St. Paul Assn. 



COMAION WITCHHAZEL 

FINE FOR SORE EYES 



It is surprinsing how. quickly eye 
inflamation is helped by common 
witchhazel. camphor, hydrastis, etc., 
as mixed iu Lavoptik eye wash. One 
elderly lady, who had -been troubled 
with chronic eye inflamation for 
many years, was greatly helped in 
two days. We guarantee a small 
bottle of Lavoptik' to help ANY CASE 
of weak, strained or inflamed eyes. 
Aluminum eye cup FREE. F. J. 
Stebbins, druggist. T-l 



Hemstitching 
MRS. McKINNEY 

Scandia Block 

'Phone 252 

Hours 10 to 12; 'J to 5 



-«i_ 



HIGHEST CASH PRICES 

Paid for all Kinds 

of 

LIVE POULTRY 

at 

DeCremer's Meat 
Market 



"Just last year the consumer paid | 
$50,000.( 00 for the handling of 27,- 
500.000,1 00 bushels of grain that 
were sob o:i the Chicago market in 
a speculative way. We believe that 
the farmjers. through a co-operative 
marketing system, can stabilize the 
market and greatly reduce the pres- 
ent cost I of handling grain. This 
would bo a great advantage to the 
consumes as well as helping the 
faimeis.'j 

Those who are expected to be. here 
for the meeting are: 

A. A. Elmo. Spokane, Wash., secre- 
tary oft the Washington-Oregon 
Wheat Growers' association. 

D. L. Lanlbert, Winnipeg, Canada, 
secretary) of the Canadian Council of 
Agricn'ture. 

George! Livingston, Washington, D. 
C. chief J>f the Bureau of Markets. 

S. Ii. BowcM, Fredonia, N. Y., mas- 
ter of National Grange. 

E. F. Ladd. president of the North 
Dakota Agricultural college. 

• H. J. Waters, former president of 
the Kansas State Agricultural college 
and at riresent editor of the Kansas 
City Weekly Star. 



BUILD A HOME 




Give your wife and children some of the com- 
forts and conveniences to which they are entitled. 
A new home would mean everything to them. They have 
worked hard enough to deserve it. 

We have a plan that will just suit you 



Prichard Lumber Co. 




BASE BALL! 

at the FAIR GROUNDS 

SUNDAY. AUG. 1st 



Gonvick 



VS. 



ll -■: ,. 

Thief River Falls 



The Gonvick team is composed almost entirely of salaried 
men and they haye a mighty fine reputation in Northwestern Min- 
nesota. The locals have also been strengthened by three new play- 
ers. A REAL GAME IS ASSURED. 



Game Called At 3:00 P. M. Sharp 







l .1 



FR1DAY, JULY 36, loao. 



Neighborhood 



Contributed Jp The Tribune's Wide-Awa\e Correspondents 



ROSEWOOD 

Despite threatening rainy anU 
electrical weather last Thursday eve. 
ning about 75 neighbors und friends 
of the community gatherei at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. A. <J. "Vorseth 
to tender them a farewell surprise 
party. Mr. Vorseth, who has for the 
last eight years served as manager 
for the Hanson & Barzeu interests at 
this place, has handed in his resigna- 
tion and will by August 1st leave by 
car for a months vacation with his 
boyhood acquaintances in. and near 
AVaterville, Iowa, and will later, take 
up his residence at Thief River Falls, 
his former home, where his daughter,. 
Elsie, will have the opportunity of 
securing better school facilities than 
at this place, and which is -one of 
Ihe main factors which causes Mr. 
Vorseth to leave Rosewood. The 
Vorseths will be accompanied on their 
vacation trip, by Mrs Jens Severson, 
of Thief River Falls, a sister of Mr. 
Vorseth and her son, .Selmar, and ex- 
pect to be back again by 1 the com- 
mencement of school this fall. Thurs" 
day evening was : delightfully spent 
musical entortainmejit • forming the 
chief diversion. Instrumental and 
vocal selections were rendered - by 
Mrs Rudolph Sagmoen, of Anita, 
violin music inc'.tiditig old time Nor- 
wegian ballads by Steiner Johnson 
and piano music by the daughter of 
the house and Miss 'Gladys Swenson. 
A tasteful luncheon contributed by 
all ihe partaking ladies and arranged 
by Mrs. A. S. Holm was served to all 
shorlty before midnight. A valuable 
twenty piece silver table. set was pre- 
sented to-the Vorseths in commemor- 
ation of the evening. 



of town 
smashup 
escaped 



~f~- 



THE TRIBUNE 



flebvs. , 



ployed at 
airatn an I 
with, i lie 
fcteiner 
for Grand 



Wait!- 



The community rejrrets to bid Mr. 
and Mi-s.-- Yorseih farewell. "With 
them leave a strong community 
boosters, a people whose willing ef- 
forts to help elevate and strengthen 
society and co-operation has won for 
them a largo number of warm friends 
Their couicenial sociability and ad- 
mirable straight-forward business 
transactions has been appreciated by 
all, and the community a< a 'whole 
join in the best wishes for their { po-sibly 
welfare in the future. 

Miss lOlsie Vorseth jrave a farewell J 
parly 10 sixteen of her jrirl friends 
last. Tuesday afternoon in commemor- 
ation of her departure to Iowa next 
week. The afternoon was very pleas- 
antly spent with in and outdoor 
sanies, music and singing and Mrs. 
Vorseth gave a dainty four o'clock 
luncheon. The visiting girls brought 
along a. very pretty white? ivory brush 
and comb set when was given rhe 
ho-tess as lemembrance from her 
sch on' fi-it'iids at Rosewood. 

Miss Xettie Batten, who has been 
attending training school for teachers in stomae 
at lieiiiidji the .last, month, returned f ( . Don 
homo Saturday morning. j Sto=li-"al 

The Chas. Sagmoen. J*. I.. Furan 
and 1". J'. Sagmoen ''families motored 
to Middle Uiver !as( Sunday to pick 
.blue bei ries. ■ * 

Itev. O. Larson of Thief River Falls 
conducted .Sunday forenoon services 
at the Rindal church north of town. 

■ l>avc Mosbec!: and Henry Lappe- 
taard are employed a: carpentry- work 
uear Vikin.g 

A. party of ladie^ /rom Thief Uiver 
Falls bad the misfortune of driving 
their Ford into the ditch a ways south 



last Monday and had a bad 
for the car but fortunately 
rltiiout injury. 
Miss Xina Westby, who has been 
employed near Thief River. Falls this 
summer bame home for a visit with 
her parents. Mils .week.' 

Juo. SjoI.svoM" left Saturday for 
St. Puiil with a mixed carload* of 
stock fun the local 'shipping- associa- 
tion. 

Miss (farrie Nelson, of Anita is 
employed at the Carl Bloom home 
during Mrs. Blooms illness. 

Mr. anO M;... R. H. Sweet, who has 
purchased the old Hartman farm and 
intend toj make their future home 
here, arrived Saturday morning from 
their former homo in South Dakota, 
and will commence immediately' to 
eiect the 'necessary buildings for oc- 
cupation. 

' Mrs. C Ison left last week for her 
home near Wannaska, after staying 
with her sister, Mis. A. Axelson for 
a week.. 

The K'iMis family and Selmer £ 
verson fLom Thie. Rive r Falls were 
Thursday afternoon visitor., at the A. 
C. Vorsetui home. 

Ole HM1 was at Warren between 
tiaiiis la.'t Saturday to seek medical 
attention 

Mildrec mid Goldie Remmem, of 
Thief Rher Falls, have .been visitors 
this week at the -Anton Guilseth 
■home. 

Mr. an 1 Mrs. Rudolph Sagmoen. 
attended the state fair at Fargo last 
week. 

Anton Guilseth autoed to Balton 
:<st week! with his mother, who will 
visit then with a daughter, Mrs. Hal- 
voKion foi- some time. On his way 
home Mr. Guilseth stopped for a day 
at Fargo o attend the fair. 

Percy -Maiison, who has been em- 
Angus this summer. is home 
will stay during haying 
Sorenson fo:ks.. 



Johnson - left last Saturday 
Forks and o:her North Da 



kota poinjs where he will visit and | 
ork for some time. 



-Don't Operate! 



Take Sto-li-gal, a doctor's prescrip- 
tion for dissolving gall stones, and 
complicated sotmach ailments. 

One hoi gives instant relief in all 
eases of GALL STONES, liver and 



stomach I 
dyspepsia 
sour 



Trice $1. 
timonials. 
gal lias h 
and it wil 



ouble, such as indigestion, 
elironic appendicitis, gas, 
tomhcli, ulcers, catarrh, pains 
[1 and back, constipation, 
t wait h.ut get a box of 
rrom' your druggist today. 
Attention ! No fake tes- 
but positive facts. Sto-Ii- 
lped thousands of people 
positively give you relief 



all ailu cuts mentioned regardless 



of your a 
Write for 
Digestive 



or duration of trouble. 

free literature to Dept. F. 

Chemical Company, • St. 
Paul, Mlnji. Sold in Thief River 
Falls, by I r. H. B. Newell, Lambert's 
Pharmacy, also leading druggists 
everywher i. 




Needed By 
Farmers 



Most of the farmi 
ton County are 
ness well in hand 
Checking Account 



keeping 
tWu 



Many prosperous fi 
Thief River Falls arc 
by their bank check 
acteristic signatures, 



Every farmer car 
this businesslike methi 
bills, obtaining receipt 
ing commercial prestif e, 



We welcome new 
an assurance of friem 



id y 



Citizens State Bank 

We'll See You at the Fair 



in Penning- 
their busi- 



reco] 



systematic 
irds. 



aimers around 

well known 

and char- 



benefit by 
d of paying 
, and build- 



aVcounts with 
attention. 



■AiStoa wjta ii 



ST.HILAIRE 

Misses Clara and Christine Peder- 
son of Thief River Falls visited with 
friends in the village over Thursday 
night. 

Miss Lulu Allen returned Friday 
from Northwood, N.. D'., near which 
.place she has spent a fortnight with] 
friends 

Mrs. Henry Braaten left Friday 
for her home, at Manville, N. D., 
after a weeks' visit at the home of 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Swan 
Johnson of Rocksbury. township. 

The members of the local womans' 
club and a number of their friends 
assembled at the A. J. Hed home 
Friday evening am", tendered Mrs. C. 
Swanson a farewell, surprise, pend- 
ing her departure fo r Minneapolis. 
The evening was enjoyabiy spent in 
various contests conversation and 
partaking of dainty refreshments. 
Before their departure the guests 
presented Mrs. Swanson with an 
appropriate token of their regard for 
her. 

- A game of baseball between Mid- 
dle River and St. Hiiaire was played 
on the local diamond Sunday, and 
the result was an easy victory for 
the local team with a score of to 
in their favor. 

Miss Ruth Gigstad returned Sim- 
day evening via the Soo line from 
Honeyford, N. D. where she had 
spent three weeks with friends. 

Hoken Johnson, of Tacoma, "Wash, 
who visited with old time friends in! 
this village early in the summer j 
spent the week end here, while en- ! 
route td his home after a lengihy! 
visit in jthis state. | 

The E. M. Hoff and A. C. Kvennes j 
families ut Middle River accoin-i 
panicd by Mr. and Mrs Oscar John- i 



son, of Oslo, motored down Sunday 
to attend the ball game and after- 
wards enjoy a 'picnic supper. 

T. returned early in the week from 
Fargo where he had marketed a car- 
load of stock fpr the Farmers' Ele- 
vator company. 

Mrs. C. Swanson and daughter, ' 
Linea. left Monday evening via Soo 
line for Minneapolis to join Dr. 
Swanson and make tneir futuit 
home in the. city Dr. and Mrs. 
Swanson have taken an active part 
in social and business life of the com- 
munity and tho their departure from 
our midst is greatly regretted ii is 
imped that they will meet with suc- 
cess and prosperity in their new 
place of abode. 

Miss Inga Fo'Mart left Saturday 
for Los Angeles. Calif. She was ac- 
companied as far as Crcokston by 
her. sister, Miss Nellie, who returned 
Monday.. 

The A. Seaverson. Onlean Olson 
and Harry Ortloff families were Sun- 
day guests at the' John Seaverson 
home in Sanders township. 

Mrs. J. B Brennan, of Hacken- 
sack Minn., and Mrs. James F. Lamb, 
of Waterloo. Iowa, left Friday eve- 
ning via Soo line after spending a 
few days at the home of their sister, 
Mrs. A. F Hall. 

Mr. and Mrs V. Loftgren, accom- 
panied by the latters mother, Mrs. 
F. Hed, left Tuesday on their return 
trip by auto for their home near 
St Peter, after a very pleasant visit 
at the A. J. Hed home. 

The Norwegian Lutheran congre- 
gations served by Rev.'C M. Grims- 
will have a joint picnic Sunday, 
August 1st. in the Martz grove on 
the east side of the river. Rev. Hil- 
dahl. of F<lss:on. is to give an ad- 
dress at 11 a in. and there will bo 



songs by the choir. It is expected 
the event will promote sociability 
and each family is to bring dinner 
for themselves and to share with 
others if necessary. 

Sirs. J. F. Sprafka and child ar- 
rived last week from Montana to 
join Dr. Sprafka and make their 
residence in this village. 

Mrs. R. J. McKerclier and children 
and Miss Liliie Boelnii motored to 
Grand Forks Sunday to visit' at the 
C. Seibert home. On their return 



Page Three 



they were accompanied by Arlene 
McKerclier who returned from a visit 
at the home of her aunt. Mrs. Sei- 
bert. 

Miss Clara and .i.artin Loners re- 
turned the latter part of last week 
from Bemidji. where they have at- 
tended the. Normal summer school. 

Mrs. Karl B. Johnson returned 
Monday to her acme ac Caribou, 
after spending a fortnight visiting 
at the H. O. Jackson home and at 
various nearby places. 



,; HI I *mi l H)H M 

BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE I 



Fire 

INSURANCE 




we advise and nrtre y 


■n to 


-t- 

+ 

X 

-t- 


call on us once and > 


e.-'mv 


a fire insurance policy. 


\\V 


t 


will guarantee to phiee 


your 


♦ 


insurance in force wit 


i. the 


+ 
t 


best company immedi 


itei'v. 


+ 


Insure your house. 


your 


> 
> 

■4- 

■f 


furniture, fittings, wt 


irii: ir 


apparel, etc. 







Lawrence Mg . Co. 



215 Alain Ave. N. 




U, M B r E wouks — ADVANCE-RUMELY COMPANY INC — LA PORTE IND. 



The Best of 
80\fears Experience i 
in this New ; ri 

omali ;: , , 

Ideal ^F 3 " 



\ 





THE accumulated mannfocrartac experience of over 
three-quarters of a century— and the judgment of 
|- over .20,000 Ideal owners — la back of the new 

I |*mall 22 x 36 Ideal Thresher. 

You know the record and reputation of the larger siiea 
Wthe Ideal— there's no farming community that hasn't Its 

Udeal I outfits with their satlsEed customers. When we were 
called upon to. build a smaller size separator, we didn't 

Just turn one out"— we built along the same lines as the 
Ideal, determined that tour, email f threshers : would be 

lleaders in their class just as are the larger. 

«„* S S. la "i" 8naia :' a «™« « f>e larger Ideals yoo wull 
, find those features : that mean^the .-difference between a 
,-W and « "guesswork^ job. ^ Meal thresher owners win 
.ten you that 

Bunching, or Tcybnder- winding b unknown in the 
loeaj-hecauss the Ideal, is designed on the principle of 
JL!*5'i. e *^f <"r<>f«trmw throaib taa snacnin. from 
tn» time it enters the cylinder until, free from all train.,, 
leaves through the stacker. 

' to* of all, we ptaesd the Ideal gntM exactly right in 
JieUtloD to*. cyHnde* sThen we designed the UcS tin. 
*2Z*i?2% 'il^^' the straw ftoS, the cyllnder^nd 
rSS.^,'^3*- R««*-«««e»te«url«c.and 
• stasdy even Sow of straw, making choking impossible: 




Shaking alone wasn't a guarantee of complete separa- 
jtlon, so we put sols of lifting fingers on the straw rack,' 
:that tear the straw open— rake it— beat it from beneaihj 
Result — complete separation and no waste. 

Then, to take care of the increased capacity due to these' 
inventions and to make the Ideal do a perfect job of clean-' 
ing, we put in extra chaffer area. The chaffer in the clean- 
ing shoe, with the adjustable sieve and our special system 
of wind control, guarantee a perfect job of cleaning with- 
out waste. Result— the kind of cleaning that gets "no 
dockage" at the elevator. 

Such construction shows why the small 22 x 36 wuT 
handle up to 900 bushels of wheat in a day's run— 
the 21 x 44 up to WOO bushels. 

The Ideal is built in five sizes — 22 x 36, 28 x 44, 28 x 48 
32 x52 and 36x60 — standard in design and construction, and 
meeting all needs, from 
the man who owns his 
own power and wants 
todohjs own threshing, 
to the custom thresher. 

There's an Ideal in 
your neighborhood. 

Tht gaarmtetd 

eil'baminr, 

oiUcooUd 

OUPuIl Tractor it 

built in sues f o fit 

every- tixe IdmuL 




ADVrVNCE'RUMEEr 



Peoples Auto Company 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



ii: ..■•.;.•■.■> ;ir:n 



:*'•> 



M::^kMMs^M^&0 S&i^M^M 




i 



Page Four j 



The Tribune 



SEMI-WEEKLY 



ESTABLISHED 1001 



Official County Paper 



Pennington Printing Company 
; PobliBVers 



Thos. A. Way, President 



PubliBhcd every ' Tuesday and Friur.v 

!at 

Th-et niver Fulls, Minn. 



Z^Z&Wi&To: 



t- 



L 



THE TRIBUNE 



the U. S. Goyernmcnt,r^r3l&rev|?ft'a^»* 
in charge of -the j>«rchase"a 1 b3'"trahs- ' 
portation of thousands of Siberian 
reindeer to Alaska- This was the 
foundatio 1 of the .reindeer herd in' 
Alaska -which has- since been so much 



discussed 



which proved so valuable in produc- 



ing a me 
Alaska, 
the orgai 



in the public prints and 



it supply for the people of 
Dr. Gambell was. one of 
teens of the First National 



B. B. McWillinnis, Editor and MnroiBrr 



Foreign Advertising Representative 
THE AMERICAN RRE5S ASSOCIATION 



Entered as second class matter at the 
POBt office at Thief River Fails, Minn., 
wider the Act of March 3, 1870. 



The pavng controversy rages. 
The newspapers cannot pave. To be 
for or against +he paving at this 
time will not add to or detract from 
the process or progress of paving. 
The Brnnimond-Bratrud administra- 
tion are for paving and they intend 
to pave in 1020 if the law books of 
Minnesota and the treasury of Thief 
Biver Falls will permit them to ac- 
complish their purpose. The oppo- 
sition are equally! determined in the 
matter and every i possible legal ob- 
stacle has been and will be placed 
In the way ro prevent the paving 
this year. A- stated above agitating 
the paving matter thru the columns 
of the papers at this slage is a light 
occupation and accomplishes noth- 
ing. It does not seem possible that 
any paving will be put in this year. 
"We do not expect to see it. 



We have a communication from 
a prominent citizen about the condi- 
tion of the streets! asking us to call 
attention to the very rough streets 
outside the district where the pav- 
ing controversy i-ages. A large 
amount of the taxpayers money is 
being expended anil we have pretty 
bad streets. This is a dry year, the 
streets are easy to. work. Perhaps the 
city authorities could do a little 
better. 



bank of ihis city in 1001, holding 
the office nf vice president and chair- 
man of ! lie board of directors dur- 
ing tlic entire time of his: residence 
here. Hi bellied organize the Pres 
byrernn church in Thief River Falls 
soon after he came- here and con- 
tinued in active membership during 
all the years since. The Physicians 
hospital i : another monument to the 
sagacity, public . spirited and pro- 
gressive in'torprise of Doctor 1 Gam- 
hell. He. was mayor of this city, 
served on the school board, park 
board an filled many positions, of 
respnosibUity and trust. In 1018 he 
went to I ussia in Red Cross Hospit- 
al work, had chatge of a train for 
many m< nths.' going to the front 
and into the interior -. and return. 
Doctor Gi mbell during his residence 
in this c ty of eighteen years was 
one of tl: e leadnig physicans. Be- 
fore his d iparture, he was banqueted 
by the I resbyterian church, the 
physician? and the Red Coss.- He 
left a clean, honorable and enviable 
record. Ioc( or Gambell is a man of 
unusual ability. He has a high class 
reputation as a physician and as a 
man. Wi commend Mm without 
reservation to -the good people of 
Santa Ana, his new residence place. 



W. H. 
IjUverne, 



Halloran : and family of 
Minn., have arrived in the 



cily. ■ Mr. Halloran has purchased 
an interest in the Times, and will 
enter on his new duties at once. Mr. 
Halloran is a brother-in-law to 
Richard H.. Ross. I Mr. Austad has 
left the Times temporarily and pos- 
sibly for a longer time. Mr. Austad 
has had many flatttring offers from 
larger papers. Tluj interest pur- 
chased by Mr. ■ Halloran we under- 
stand does not in any way disturb 
the Shaw-McGinn j stock holdings. 
In fact the new combination would 
seem to be Rhaw-McGinn-Halloran. 
We welcome Mr, Halloran to the 
local newspaper field and extend to 
Mm the olive branch of amiability, 
consistent witli the.! harmony, peace 
good will and fellowship that exists 
among we brethern of the craft in 
this particular cheerful, and sunny 
corner of the Lord's vineyard, set 
apart for humble effort and high 
hopes in journalistic! effort. 



At a mte.ring of the Republican 
nominees for state and congressional 
offices he! 1 at the office of State 
Auditor Preus last Friday ' Atty. G. 
A. Youngouist, of the firm of Loring 
and Younf quist, Ctookston and Hon. 
Paul Mast balk, of Warroad, were 
named inenbers of the State Central 
Com. frcm the Ninth . District. 
They willt assume their duties at 
and proceed to help line up a ma- 
jority in Minnesota for every nomi- 
nee on tlie ticket Nationa.l State, 
and District. This is a republican 
year and the tepublieans will doubt- 
less win all along the line. 



• All day! Sunday, says . the Thief 
River Falls Times, townsfolk were 
driving out to a farm a few miles 
out to look|st a 40-acre field of clover 
that was sjx to seven feet tall. Down 
here in the short clover country, 
where all that most of us know about 
clover is tjint a four-!eafed plant is 
an omen of luck to the superstitious, 
this seems] a pretty tall story. But 
the agriculture of Northern Minne- 
sota would be a source' of envy and 
wonder tol a good many dwellers 
down state who have not kept pace 
with development in a region which 
used to spjell little but lumbering to 
most Minnesotans. -Northern Minne- 
sota is on the high road to becoming 
an empirepn its own account. — Min- 
neapolis Tribune. 

Our swejet clover story received 
honorable mention but unfortunately 
for us it was credited to the Shaw 
paper, (Times). TVe will get even wit H 
the Minneapolis paper. We intend to 
publish al picture of this sweet 



.JJh^^on^' gr^tt^rg!} vot homOj he 
typifiVd'HU tnat'is~best and' ali' that 
is hopeful in America. 

This home-coming of Senator 
Harding's was a sign of the home 
coming of the Nation, after several 
years wandering in strange pastures, 
after being led into alien paths, and 
allured by strange and .perilous ex- 
periments.'-'.' ' ' :, ' ? 

The American republic has been 
away from home, amid scenes un- 
American, listening to voices in the 
air and seeing things unreal and un- 
wholesome. It has been Veil into 
the swamps of internationalism and 
foreign entanglements. It has been 
intoxicated by "moral obligations," 
"spiritual! leadership" and "ethical 
government," . 

Senator Harding's home comiug is 
the first real sign of the Nation's 
home coming. Iu simple words in 
touching language the leader of the 
Republican party teds his own home 
folks that "government is not of su- 
permen but of normal' men, very 
much like you and me." 

The Senator's simple and telling 
words told the story of patriotism, 
when he said of the town of Marion: 
"We ail piayed the . game together; 
because it was our game. . . . .It 
is a waste of God's rich endowments 
to assail and destroy when all the 
flowers of life bloom best in the soil 
of sympathy and encouragement." 

This is the spirit of optimistic 
loyalty to country, to Amerca. it is 
a superb definition of patriotism. It 
is the key to Senator Harling's life, 
now opened before the American poo- 
pie. Is it not an inspiration? 

Pointing to his own home town 
and its wonderful growth, the Senator 
said: "No superhuman did it, no one 
man did it. Now make the applica- 
tion. This wonderful' laud of ours 
is but the aggregate of communi- 
ties . . . and the necessary har- 
mony of purpose must lie In council, 
in the wisdom of plural 'leadership, 
not in the glory of supermen." 

Here is our guide for future r.c- 
tivity as a nation. Here is the bea- 
con leading to the safe harbor. Here 
is the great lesson of the home com- 
ing of Senator Harding. It breathes 
the spirit of union, it tells the. storyi 
of- America, it signifies the home 
coming of a misled and misguided 
Republic. 



FRIDAY, JULY 30, loao 



It is certain that the next presi- 
dent will come from .Ohio. 



'LA FOLLETTE READS SELF 

OUT OF O. O..P. RANKS 



SIGNED EDITORIAL DECLARES 
EITHER PARTY CANDIDATE 
MEANS PLUTOCRATS' DIC- 
TATORSHIP 



clover. 



If some influence could be brought 
to bear to cause everybody or near- 
ly everybody • to trim the trees it 
would help the appearance of things. ! there 
The. tret's along the walks especially, j Thi 
should be trimmed. It is a thousand ' ' 
times bettor for thej trees, and it is 
bettor for the people who use the 
walks. Trim the trees along the 
walks, and by all means when you 
trim them think of next winter and 
make a little allowance for snow and 
get the branches up |where they will 
not gouge "the bird on Nellie's hat." 



THE 



Four 400 pound blocks of granite 
hewn near the landing |place of the 
pilgrims at Plymouth', Mass., were in 
the cargo of the Cunard liner In- 
kula which sailed for England from 
. Boston recenty. The stones will be 
corner markers of a' new Salvation 
Army citadel in Plymouth, England, 
the port from which! the Mayflower 
sailed 300 years ago. They are the 
gift of New England forces of the 
Salvation Army. 



Dr. F. H. Gambe 
stated in. these colure 



1 as heretofore 
ns has returned 



from the war zone in Russia where 
■ he has been in Red Cross Hospital 
work for the past eighteen months, 
and has now located in in a fine 
home in Santa Ana, | California, and 
has engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine in that delightful western cit». 
Dr. Gambell came' to 1 . Thief River 
Eai:s in 1001. Prior jo that time he 
had been in the practice of medicine 
for a short time in Iowa. Tires he 
went, for a period of two years to 
Alaska -'itnder a cominfeslon Jfrom 



IHUNTING] 

r(m BOND ' 



will show 'em. 



MORNING AFTER 



As usual after a i'engthy debauch, 
is a bad taste in the mouth, 
is th< result of the democratic 
ii the San Francisco con- 
It has left a bad state of 
ricked 'resentment among 
of the several candidates, 
te party into fragments. 
Reed was hit with the 
imroller, and went home 
Ihird day, tearful, discon- 



debauch 
ventiou. 
nerves, a 
the friends 
and torn t 

Senator 
Wilson ste 
after the 
late and mad. 

W. J. Bryan was flattened out 
by the saine - Wilson steamroller, 
cheered bwthe|inob and hopelessly 
defeated.by the same mob. He wept 
also as Jrej witnessed the turning ot 
is ljeo-1 into stone. 

Mi-Adoo, the Crown Prine-\ re- 
fused to b i a candidate and was 
uije to n trade before ll.o conven- 

m for fo ty-four long bar. 'is, with 

bunch oi hay just out of reach. 

i'ulniei, he faithful Fidns Achates 
of the ,Vh te House, the guardian of 
the ark of the covenant, was held in 
leash by the Wilson ndmiuistraiibn 
forces to 1 revent the nomination of 
He 00 was left by the road- 
nied in a thin immortal- 
Tanmiany-Tnggart sleam- 



Cox. 

side, emba 
ity by the 
niller, . 

There were 



be Candida es whose chagrin and dis- 



appointment 
candidate 



Wilson ma tfiine. 



bode no good for Ihe 
put |across' by the niiti- 



Too bad 
and- energy 



sccnes< 



some twenty would- 



to waste so much money 
for nothing but defeat. 



A HOME COMING 
(By idward N. Dingley) 
Perhaps the most impressive and 
significant picture in the art gallery 
in the Chi -ago Exposition of 1893 
was a smali painting entitled, "Break- 
ing Home Ties " Crowds moved to 
tears by tt rider memories, stood for 
hours befoij it. It touched the heart 
strings, anl typified the moving 
force of An lerica — home 
WI\cn J<hn Howard Payne in R 
1 wrote of "Home Swe°t 
touched the one mighty 
swells into the, chorus ofc 



■Madison, Wis., July 22 — Senator 
Robert M. I,aFc-!)ette has repudiated 
the Republican party as a member 
of which ho wan three times elected 
governor of Wisconsin and twice to 
the United States Senate. 

In a signed editorial in IjiiFolictte's 
Magazine, issued today, the senator 
said : "The old parties have failed." 

"Popular government cannot long 
endure in this country without an 
aggressively progressive party," the 
editorial said. 

"The Republican and Democratic 
conventions just concluded demon- 
strate that these parties are com-' 
pletely controlled thru political boss- 
es by the great special interests and 
that the election of either of their 
-candidates means a dictatorship of 
plutocracy, and political industrial 
servitude, for the great mas s of the 
people. '■ 

"Tlie great trusts - which control 
the markets for agricultural products 
fix prices so low to the farmer. as to 
allow him at best only a hard-earned 
exis.once, while the prices of the 
same products to the consumer are 
so high as to compel him to limit 
his purchases to the barest neces- 
sities. Thus the producer aad c'on-^ 
sumer are robbed and commerce and 
industry are paralyzed." — Minneap- 
olis Tribune. ' 

What Senator LaFolIette say s of 
the two great parties is true to some 
extent, more true than it should be. 
The trusts have lis by the throat, 
but party politics is not the remedy. 
Oi sanitation by the farmers and 
growers, is the remedy. The automo- 
bile- maker fixes the price, the Weaver 
fixes the price of e'.oth, the miller 
names the price of flour. The farm- 
er pays the price that has been fixed 
for everything he buys. . He should 
name the price on what he se'fls. 
Senator LaFol'ette's uew party may 
he interesting as a matter of polities 
but it will. not. so've any economic 
questions. 



CREDIT STRAIN IS SEEN 

IN 1910 CROP MOVE 



far off lane 
Home," he 
chord that 
the Unionf. 

When Sejiator Warren fj. Hajfain 
s_£>od' befofi^hhs friends and tfelghjf 
hors in fiis own home town, when 
he permittel his memory to. picture 



when 



heart .was t luchod By^thc kirj^iy and 



FAILURE TO LIQUIDATE 1919 
LOANS IS CAUSE, SAYS FED- 
ERAL RESERVE REPORT 



(By Associated Press.) 
Chicago, July 26.— Failure to 
liquidate grain loans incurred in mov- 
ing last year's crops, a situation 
largely due to the car shortage, will 
strain the country's credit facilities 
still further when the movement of 
the 1920 crops begins,, the Seventh 
Federal Reserve bank announces in 
its July report. The banks will be 
•j leanedMin 10 financeftw* crops at one 
j|time,|it. is>Tjoir«r«djo.6t; ancl. ; nt the 
*samej ti&p huj^»gm£urit« of ^capital 
furnisheUV^y > 6^..F.Ufaited Ij&faUp 
Grain corporation last year have been 
withdrawn. - 

Oiie noticeable .influence in the 






the let-up in- farjiflahcf antf.eity real 
estate sales.-BanWhaW^u#eea'ea~Tn 
checking land speculation, according 
to the report. 

"There are distinct signs of a 
slowing down in manufacturing," 
the bank reports. "In very few lines 
is production up to schedule, and in 
.practically all liaes it is. being ham- 
pered by one influence or another. 
The automobile business is the out- 
standing exception."- 

"Automobile business (manufac- 
turing) is the controling exception." 

Certainly the big banks can and 
do control such lines ^as they choose 
to curb and control. Automobile man- 
ufacturing being an "outstanding 
exception" — because the big banks 
and their directors and owners own 
the automobile factories. Certainly 
there is plenty of money for them. 
Only for the Federal Reserve bank 
there would be no money to handle, 
the wheat. Iu a speech before the 
country 'elevator owners in Minne- 



apolis recently E. W. Decker presir 
dent of the great First National bank 
of Minneapolis said, "We have thirty 
two millions of dollars we could loan 
but not. one dollar will we loan-, to 
store wheat in country elevators." 
Meaning— Send it iu to Minneapolis 
to us then we will have your wheat 
and your money too. The Federal 
Reserve bank souii after came to the ■ 



Hans Nilson and family, who came 
up to enjoy a few days visiting at 
the Johnsrud home southeast of the 
village. 

Mrs. Ida Johnson lias been suffer- 
ing from sore throat trouble lately- 
Her motherinlaw, Mrs. B. Johnson, 
of Thief River Falls, has boon as- 
sisting with the house work 

Throe silos now loom up In ihe 



fescue with the cash needed to mar- ! immediate vicinity 

ket crops in the. regular and nor- j Johnsrud's built last 

mal way. — Plenty of western hioney, [ Fjelds' and <'. O. 

contiollcd by the east, to keep the: built. If 'A. J. Hole 

;oin 



.nf Eric — oie 
hill, and IIan« 
Elg's rocently 
<-:m oii'-o mal;.-- 
automobile factories going though; 'up his miml to bnihl his -mkiv- y.;-:_ 
our troubles are all at the top where I possibly have the privilege of beiue- 
the controllers are. ' silo number -i. ■ 

■ ] Ludvig Johnson lias been engaged 

during ihe last two weeks ar sum- 
mer fallowing on his failier's piaee 



ERIE 

Tlie grain that was oast struck by 
the hail storm east of Erie is strait- 
.oning up somewhat. 

Ole Johnsrud and sou, Odin, 
motored to Thief Rive r Falls Satur- 
day morning to meet old time neigh- 
bors. from Clay county, Mr. and Mrs. 



near Thief Itivor F-alls. with l;U 
Fordson rig. 

Tho evangelists who i-uinliK-ic-t'l 
meetings in this vicinity last, week 
succecded in converting a few. Ked 
Jjake river water was used in the 
baptismal ceremony. 



Don't Wait for the Custom Thresher— 



Do Your Own Work With an 

E=B GEISER 



An E-B Geiser Thresher for Your Individual Work 
is the Best Buy, because- 



The E-B Geiser is not an experiment. It is a proven success with 
years of satisfactory service at ]iome and abroad to its credit. 



space- 



It is a small, compact machine with a big capacity. 
-it's all thresher and will do a clean job of threshing. 



Th 



ere is no waste 



It cleans the grain without sieves. The 
grooved rollers, and is mechanically perfect. 



cleaning is done 



by 



combs and 



It runs light— it hauls light— it is light. It has few parts and no unnecessary 
material to add weight. It is efficiently designed and built by skilled Workmen. 



The E-B Geiser is'not a Junior, but 



a real threshing machine capable 



doing, at your convenience, as efficient work as any big thresher, 



Rambeck-Stone 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 





Special 

Exhibit 
During Fair Days 



Owing to the crowded conditions at fair grounds we shall 
arrange for a very special machinery display at our office 
and warehouse during fair days. We shall also have some 
bargains and invite you to call and look things' over. 

/.'■■'■ 



-i \ a ■ ■ 




C. Gustafson & Son 

Implement Dealers Thief River Falls, Minn. 

' ' Branch at Grygla 



'■'■TS~ : \ 



iS£i&tiyi£j!s:ifei 



.' r '."*■" r. ] " T:'- r " .""■":."' ■■;-•" "■" ~- 1 v*™>~ ..^:p:V~~T^ r '?^^i^ ) * > "-^*.''^ 



^rsr-i./ ■V^ J 't:.-;s , ? u ^T? 4j 'i'i''''-,''''-C'. •i ,v/ ' 1 ' ; ■"'."• "'.-'" •--' -' 



FRIDAY, JULY 30, 11930- 



as 



THE TRIBUNE 



,.U».-!i 



Page Five 




NO W"S THE THE TO WIN 

Saturday Night is the Last Night of the Tribune's Great 
$3,600 Automobile Campaign 



Now is the time to win! Not tomorrow or tomorrow night, but NOW! 

The Tribune's $3,600 automobile campaign is so near to the end that there is no more time for hesi- 
tation—there can be no excuse or desire for hesitation on the part of those workers who wish to win. 
Tomorrow night at eight o'clock the greatest prize campaign ever conducted "in northern Minnesota, ends. 
Will you bq a winner when the judges announce their decision? Now is the time to make yourself a 
victor. Hard work for the remainder of today and tomorrow may mean all the difference between success 
and failure lor you. Real work from now to eight o clock Saturday night may turn the tide in your favor. 
Get every possible vote and get them now! 

a lot of your friends who will subscribe, whom you have not yet called upon or whom 
not solicit with sufficient energy. There are a lot of people who once refused you, who, 

them once more, would subscribe at once. There are a lot of friends and neighbors of yours, who. while they 
subscribed once, will be glad to help you with another extension. It's up to you to get every possible sub- 
hope to win. The final instructions for the close of the campaign appear below. Follow them closely 
: the only guide to the awarding of prizes will be merit— -will be vote totals. What is your vote total? Unless 
truthfully say that it is of winning size, you cannot hope/to win! Finish up your campaign with an energetic appli- 
constant effort which will win the car you want. 



are 



There 

you did not 

if you solicited 
have already 
scription if you 
Remember thai 
you can 
cation and a 



Here are Your Final Instructions— Read Them Carefully 

AH votes or subscriptions to count in the campaign must be in the hands of the Campaign Manager by eight o'clock on 
Saturday nightl July 31st. No orders may be mailed for credit in the offices of the Automobile. Campaign Department after 6 
p. m. Friday ejening, July 30s!t. Inasmuch as candidates are requested to be present at the final count, which is to be open to 
all interested parties, it is suggested that these candidates be sure to bring in their finai orders at the same time This is the 
final vote counj to be published by the management of the Tribune's automobile campaign. From now on a sealed and locked 
ballot box will be in the office of the manager, in which all orders can he placed. Orders mailed to be accepted for the final 
count must be sent Special Delivery and directed to the Manager Automobile Campaign Department. The final count will be 
closed in time |o give candidates orders for their prizes, so.that the winners of the cars may have them for use on Sunday 
August 1. The count will be open at all times and complaints or corrections can be made to the judges, to be passed on by them' 



Win or Lose— Which Shall it Be? 

Do you vfi nt to win, in The Tribune's great £3:600 automobile campaign— or do you wish to lose? 

It^your decision that will tell the tale. The time has passed when the management of the automobile campaign can helo 
you. The only help that can be given to you now fe.thu* advice "Do Your Hardest Work". The only key to success for you 
is winning work-work which you can truthfully say is better and more successful than that of any other candidate Don't trv 
to make yours slf believe that there are few active workers, for you will be mistaken if you do. Do not allow yourself to slow 
up through over-confidence, for to do so means to lose inevitable: \ 

WIN OR LOSE-WHICH SHALL IT BE? Your work right how will tell the tale. 






1 



Votes Will Win*%nd You Jeeilots of 




Page Six 



Free Attractions 
Featured at 

AUGUST 4th, 5th and 6th, 1920 



PENNINGTON COUNTY FAIR THIBF smR ?alls 




THAT FUNNY CLOWN with The 
Savages presenting a side splitting 
"act on the mechanical' revolving lad- 
der. 



GE59I 




■ftt'^r! '"'fl^HSB 




HlMH 




^1 BBk^w^* >' <S'^WbmHi 

■ j iJfjjl 






Ml, "i 



A1ISS 

Alla s Trio,' 
Triple Trapr 
Aire the pulil 



IRENE SAVAGE of The 

e of the most clever 
artists appearing he- 








X ^*i.»"Jii/. :- '-j&.JiS£?X-SV; £'-!":J 



H 



i 

;.■-.- ■. : ,i- l r\-— -.•— — t-;.. ,i. ,«,,, . , <lt . r: ,„_. ; _ _,_. ._.„._..... .„__ _ .... ,-.,.,JI 1... _ . j. . I f i '■ 

■ ' •-■■ ..:■'■ • '■■':'..'■. ■>• '■■.••.■-.■■.:"•:- '"''■..'.:..' :■;■/ ■■ •. ■'::•.."' ■".• • •■--•.• ■ .■ ■■■- .-.■■. s - * 



THE TRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JULY 30, 1920 



MINNESOTA 
Afternoon and Evening Programs 









i-vPIP 








WMSmmf'^ 






mmmm^ 



ml\ 




lfe^.^iiU^iU6fejsc jgs; 




wwted 






i^^W'-^k%r : - l 








■the ;' : 1 
iip side down 

OR AN V /IDE j 

up Dee 





'& fe 






Skfe 



'MP 



oi 



clover 



never little i-u 



ART WILLIAMS, that Daredevil Birdmau who! BRANCEL & JACK — Introducing one of the most Ijcuutiful and . 
alks on the wings in in id air, hangs by his knees s ' ,tlek wire acts Jn VaudcviKe. 
the supports and crawls all over that pi'ane ' Presenting"* wonderful line qf juggling and balancing tricks on a thin- 
hundreds of feet in the ■ thread of a wire, he also rides forth and back on a unieycle u nick 
■ air finishing' his perfor- i which must be seeii to he appreciated. 

niances with a drop in a j. He is assisted by Jack, no Jack is not human lie 
parachute from the aero- 1 Terrior and does everything but talk. - 

"^ plane ac an altitude of ■ : 

' 5.000 feet the greate.-t j 

thriller in the amusement ; 
world of today. Appear- 
ing August 5th, only, 
afternoon and evening. 








w 





THE ATLAS TRIO— These 
artists 25 feet in the air perform 
the most daring and hazardous 
feats of strength and agility ever 
presented to the pubMc. 





MISS EVELYN SA VAlil' 
tin- real llnhlers with ; i;e A: 
Triple Trapeze .Acria' I ";i-t in^r 



The original 



THE SAVAGES 

Mechanical Revolving Ladd r Act introduc- 



ing the most comical Ciown n 6w appearing before, the pub 
lie. This act will he especially pleasing to 1 be kiddies 



The Little 
GIANT 
SHOWS 

— Featuring — 

New Aeroplane Carro- 
usel, Merry-Go-Roiind, 
Ferris Wheel, and 
many new and novel 
feature shows and 
amusement devices. 



LIEUT: LARRABEE, known as 
"The Flying Squirrel" with the 
Minneapii'is Baiiy News Flying Cir- 
cus. Appearing August 5th, only, , 
afternoon and evening. 



A 




mm 







THE GREAT SIGFRIED 

The Champion Ski jumper of Sweden and holder of 
.the Canadian Cross Country championship in an exhibi- 
tion 'of that great Scandinavian National sport, the 
most novel and entertaining act appearing before the 
public. Sigfried is the only man in the world putting 
on such an exhibition in m id-summer. 



iK 




~'' t . 




THE ATLAS TRIO 

In their death defying Triple Trapeze 
Act, they defy every law of gravitation 
the world upside down. 



(.'listing 
ami turn 



^i'nsiiii£ii 



L^J&.-Ssaas&is AiMsSilfei 



^Ss'-iu%&a 




-if- 



FRIDAY, JULY 




A, HOME/ THE FllDA 



-M 




/ 



J 



<H. A. Ham 

Right in/the hands of the fathers 
and mothers of tl>is great nation lies 
.the absolute pow;e r to regu!ate and 
formulate the destinies of all of the 
.governments of the civilized world. 

After all is $nid and done, is it not 
a .fact, that in; order to create and 
buii'd up such ;i city, such a state or 
such a nation as Will stand up to the 
end of time as a nation of right living, 
and right thinking peopi'e; a city, 
state or nation, the management of 
whose affairs can be most rigidly in- 
vestigated at any time and found to 
l)e on the. square: a city, state or na- 
tion who has rt heart the love and 
honor of its people, a Vove so strong 
and an honor based on such high and 
uplifting principles, thai it will at 
any time and under any conditions 
protect them from • any harm or dan- 
ger; I say is it hot, a fact that every- 
one of these qualifications must be 
first pronm'gated ji n the individual 
homes of this nation, from which go 
out the severat uui^s of power, which, 
go to make up (he governments of the 
world. I 

To a child's mind, every statement 
that is made and 'every act that is 
committed, by either of the parents, 
sticks in the child's mind as the right 
thing to say and do. . Some of the 
political parties: of our nation today 
■are teaching to a great degree class 
hatred. " This very thing, if talked in 
the home, as it no idoubt is in many 
instances, immediately insti'ds in the 
child's mind the idea of dislike for { 
certain other children. This cVass j 
hatred, to my mind,} one of the great- j 
est curses ever perpetrated, on man- 
kind, must be stopped in the home; or 
from this unit of power win spring a 
combination <;f unirsv whose influences 
wilV always have, an'd always has had 
a demoralizing effect on any nation 
werever class hatred has managed to 
gain a foothold; foi* any i'ength of 
time. I do not . j bejieve it is the 
thought or intention of any true 
American who loves his home, his 
nation or the sacred things which it 
stands for. to be.mixed^up in any of 
these national destructive associa- 
tions, if he. knew them; to be such; 
but I do be-'ieve there is considerable 
truthfulness in the 'statement made 
by Richard Oari'ye. one of the .ioted 
comedians of the stage., when he said: 
■"We're nothing but poor, weak mor- 
tals after all." Aud|instead of keep- 1 
ing both our feet- onj the ground and 
plugging along minding our own busi- 
ness, we are carried! away by the 
high flung cratory qf some" spell- 
binder who has his hpad packed with 
numerous phony i ideas, and before 
we know it we wake up to the fact 
that ali the. avenues j to production 
are getting pretty; well filled up with 
foui grass and weef*s; while we have 
been resting on our arms listening 
to ' some of these, so-called radicals 
and idea'usts. We also wake up to 
the fact that white we have been 
traveling aronnl me country attend- 
ing all the different i meetings and 
•spending our money! to Iceep in the 
ring, that the cost ofj living does not 
materially decrease but the consump. 
tion of our food stuffs is stealily on 
the increase. We should everyone of 
us ask ourve/ves the question, "What 
can I best do to help my country dur- 



!-.»V»f^**T* 



THE TRIBUNE 



Page 7 



divided 
ing .one 
exactly 



rt'aces, 
the real 



organize 
earth. 



bodies, 
eomplisl 



one foot 



ing these houfolesome 
around anl talk what 



man. or his party or this state ought 



"to do. hut each one of 



times?" Not sit 
you think this 



us individually, 



should, in our own homes, exemplify 
by right living and work, the love 
and the contentment that can be se- 
cured by us all, by just doing these 
wo things. . j . 

Work, and by the word work, I of 
course mean productive labor along 
ivery single line of endeavor, together 
with right living. | wliich practically 
svery sane and sounij person living 
in this age knows the meaning of, 
these two things nlonel will I am con- 
vinced overcome all of the ills, all 
?f the strife, of every nature, both 
political and economicl all of the un- 
rest, now prevalent through this land, 
all of the unwarrantel extravagance, 
and the idleness, which itself breeds 
discontent, in fact work and right liv- 
ing; exemplified in each indivSual 
aomc would send forth such units of 
power into each city, government, 
jach state government! each national 
government, that the|spirit of con- 
;entment and good will would most 
issuredly predominate,! and the result 
would be a nation! whose time was 
occupied in productive labor along 



OF POWER 



every 1 ne, and this spirit would be 
the gre iter enhanced by a whole 
1 souied, physically fit, clear-minded 
and contented body of human beings, 
who, in their own homes had been 
taught ight living. 

As a ;ood clear case for illustration 
of the above argument, let u 3 take an 
aching ooth. Through improper liv- 
ing or i nproper eating we have some 
trouble ra-ith our teeth. They begin 
to ache, and we have within our body 
a discoi tented and complete'}' upset 
nervous system. We may have, a 
temporaVy filling put in and our pain 
relieved for the time being, or it may 
run alor g satisfactorily for a long 
time. ISut. sooner or later, without 
fail we wi'l again have trouble and 
the nex; time we will insist on the 
dentist loing clear to the bottom of 
the trou >!e and making an everlasting 
job of it if possible. As any other 
method is really only prolonging the 
agony, f o in our present day troubles, 
we flout der around trying i n some 
to strike upon something that 
will fit (he minds of the people and 
find ourselves getting mixed up and 
nto classes and groups, fight- 
another. not knowing just 
ivhat for, and the result will 
be a ten iporarily organized system of 
things v Inch will, after a while shape 
themseles around into the proper. 
' tut not until we- have got at 
base of the trouble' and right, 
ed it Hit re to begin with. Start right 
in the I ome the most powerful of 
1 society on the face of this 
ntl teach work, productive 
work, labor that produces along with 
ight 11 ing, which gives us strong 
(tear minds and a will to ac- 
By using the. power of your 
own ho&ie, which is in your hands, 
lo more, even without owning 



you can 

an auto nobie. to make a steadfast 
and thri Ity nation by putting consld 
erable o ' your, time at teaching and 
practlcin g what you preach, along the 
lines of productive labor and right 
living. In your home and my home, 
rests a unit of power, upon which 
both feet should always stand fast, 



on work — the work that pro- 



duces, tl e other foot snx right living, 
wliich is the real basic principle of a 
home toying, contented and happy 
people 



IS 
TO BE 



EXPECTED TO REPLACE VARI- 
ETIES NOW USED IN THE 
HkRD WHEAT BELT 



Manhs ttan, 
acres on 



Kan. — Millions 



of 

the Cential West, will be 
planted fihis year with a superwheat, 
which yields from three to five bush 
els an a?ro more, than varieties now 
grown. 



The superwheat is Kanied, devel- 
oped thru 14 years of. careful ex- 
perimentation from a '- single head 
brought from Russia. It promises 
completely to - replace .varieties now 
grown in the hard wheat areas, and 
to increase materially the grain pro- 
duction of the country.- 

Approximately half a million acres 
were seeded wilh Kanred last fall. 
If the pure seed from this harvest 
Is planted next fall, the acreage will 
be six or seven million, and . after 
that it is believed that use of the 
new variety wiil become general. 
The Kansas Crop Improvement asso- 
ciation, composed of GOO farmers?-*!* 
endeavoring to have all the pure seed 
replanted. 

It is expected a. fourth of the 
hard wheat acreage, in Kansas, and 
large acreages in Oklahoma, Texas, 
Nebraska. -Wyoming, Colordo and 
South Dakota will be sown with 
Kanred. Eventually Kanred will be 
grown univei.sa'.ly in the hard wheat 
country, in the opinion of specialists 
■at tine. Kansas experiment station 
here, where the new variety was de- 
veloped. 

Turkey and Kharkof are the two 
varieties of hard ffhea't most com- 
monly grown, and Kanred has dem- 
onstrated its superiority over those. 
It has been successfully grown in 
every state of the hard wheat belt, 
and is confidently believed by experi- 
ment station workers to be better 
than any other variety grown as far 
north as South Dakota. 

The new wheat is somewhat more 
resistent to winter killing, a charac- 
teristic that paricutarly recommends 
it for the northern^jart of the hard 
wheat belt Winter . wheat- yields 
higher than spring wheat when it 
resists the long, cold seasons of that 
region. : 

Prior to tne development of Kan- 
red there was no variety of common 
wheat that was able to resist rust, 
one of the worst enemies of the 
g-aiu. Mi'.lions of bushels have been 
lost in a single season as a result of 
thar disease. The -peculiar breeding 
of Kanred has me.de it remarkably re 
sistant to red rust or leaf rust. 

The early maturing qualities of 
Kanred make it peculiarly adapted to 
the 'dry farming region -of which a 
large part, of the hard wheat belt 
is composed. Milling qualities equal 
other vareties are claimed for Kan- 
red. Only an expert can tell the 
difference in the appearance of it 
and other varieties. Last season a 
carload, of Kanred grown in Co!o- 
rado topped the Minneapolis market, 
samples of Kanred have been milled 
at the. Kansas state agricultural col- 
lege mill every year since the wheat 
was developed, but no difference 
had been observed between it and 
either Turkey or Kharkof. 



hereof; and that- Monday the thirty- 
o'clock A.-M.,".in" the Probate^ Court 
Rooms at the Court House at Thief 
River Falls in said County, be, and 
'the same hereby is, fixed and ap- 
pointed as the time ami place for 
hearing upon and che examination, 
adjustment and allowance of such 
claims as shall be presented within 
the time aforesaid. 

Eet notice hereof be given by the 
publication of this order in the Trb- 
une, a semi-weekly newspaper pub- 
lished at Thief River Falls, Minne- 
sota, once a week for three successive, 
weeks according to law. 

Dated July 27th 1920. 

Ira C. Richardson, 
(Court Seal) Judge of Probata 

Theo. Quale, Attorney. 



Order LimitingTime to File Claims 
and for Hearing Thereong 

State of Minnesota, ss. County of 
Pennington, in Probate Court. 

In the Matter of the Estate of 
Edwin K. Hogenson. Decedent 

Letters of Administration with the 
Will annexed this day having been 
granted to T. P. Hnmre 
- It is Ordered, That the. time with- 
in which all creditors of the above 
named decedent may present claims 
against his estate in this Court, be, 
and the same hereby is, limited, to 
six months from and after the date 



It Is Just as 

DANGEROUS 

to be without adequate Tornedo insurance as it is 
fir e insurance. In the majority of cases fire losses 
ar » not total but when a tornado strikes, it means 

a total loss to everything in its path. 

i . 

We have on display in our Bank actual kodak 
pic tures of the Fergus Falls tornado of last year 
wl ich shows clearly the enormous destruction of 
property" in that town. 



Rates Extremely Nominal as follows! 
Dwelling' houses and contents $4 per'Sl.000 for 3£rears 
Mercantile buildings and contents $5 per $1,000 for 3 years 



First National Bank 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 
Resources Over One Million Dollars 



Order Limiting Time to File Claimd 
and for Hearing Thereon 

State of Minnesota, ss. County of 
Pennington, in Probate. Court. 
. In tbe Matter of the Estate of 
Christ Mathson. Decedent 

Letters testamentary this day hav- 
ing been granted to Martin Mathson 

It is. Ordered. That the time with- 
in which all creditors of the above 
named decedent may present claims 
against his estate in this Court, be, 
and the same hereby is. limited to 
six months from and after the date 
hereof; and that Monday the thirty- 
first day of .Tnuunij- 1021. at ten 
first day of January 1021. at' 10 
o'clock A. M.. in the Probate Court 
Rooms at the Court House at Thief 
River Falls in said County, be. and 
the same hereby is, fixed and ap- 
pointed as the time and place for 
hearing upon and the examination, 
adjustment and allowance of such 
claims as shall be presented within 
the time aforesaid. 
- Let notice, hereof be given by the 
publication of this order in the Trib- 
une, a semi-weekly newspaper pub- 
lished at Thief River Palls, Minne- 
sota, once a week for three successive 
weeks according to law. 

Dated July 27th 1920. 

Ira C. Richardson, 
(Court Seal) Judge of Probate 

Theo. Quale. Attorney. 



EMPIRE FARMS CO. 

Capital $25,000 

Lands Loans City Property Insurance 

Bring your business to us. 

We Promise courtesy and efficiency 

215 Main Ave. i\. . ■ ■ 
'Phone 443 i 
Thief River Palls, Minnesota 



The Onle Food Above All 



It 
It 



IS 



IS 



delicious 
wholesome 



It is absolutely the only economical 
food to be bought today. 



FRESH EVERY DAY 



MOTHER'S BREAD! 



Overland & Willys- 
Knight Automobiles 
Republic Trucks 

Each is the best in its 
division 

See them at the Pennington 

County Fair Grounds 

Next Week 



Northwestern Auto Co. 



K. A. Suadahl, Prop. 




Page Eight 



PERSONALS 



Mrs. Jol a Peek, of Lankin, N-. D., 



Mrs. K. Ii. Johnson, ol Lancaster, 
was in the city on Tuesday shopping 
and visiting with friends: 

Milford LaBree and Charles Her- 
ron. who have been enip'oyed in Su- 
perior for some time; past, returned 
to their respective homes' in this city 
on Tuesday. ' i 

Mclvin Mortude, of: Argyle, arrived 
in this, city Tuesday evening to visit 
for a short time with 'friends and 
relatives: \ \ \ 

Elmer Smith, of Lancaster, was in. 
this city visiting with j friends on 
t Tuesday. . i" . • 

Mr. and Mrs. G. (\ Strceter motored 
to. Red Lake Falls Saturday where 
they were joined by :Mrj and Mrs. j. 
J. Helm, the entire party then motor- 
ing to Grand Forks to attend the fair. 
Mrs. E. YV. Hinrirlis and children 
of Crookston. arrived!- in this city 
Tuesday afternoon where they will 
make their future home. Mr. Hin- 
richs will have charge of the J. C. 
Penney store that is about to open in 
this city. : j 

Miss Ilet LeSage,' who has been 
visiting with friends and relatives in 
Crookston for the past few days re- 
turned to her home in this city Tues- 
day. ; 

Miss Marie Thill, -who has spent 
the past week in Red Lake Falls with 
friends and relatives, returned to t this 
citjy on Tuesday. 

Rev. I. T. Aastad. formerly of this 
city and who is now stationed at 
Detroit, spent Tuesday jhere attend- 
ing to "matters of business. 

Mrs. A. Wangenstjen ! returned to 
this city from Greenbush on Tuesday, 
where she has been visiting with 
friends. j 

Miss Lylnbelle Schuster left Tues- 
day afternoon for Crookston where 
she will visit with friends. 

Mrs. A. O. Wiste. accompanied by 
her granddaughter, MissJEinma Han- 
son, left Tuesday for Fertile -where' 
they will make their future home. 

Mrs. Ordean Olson, of St Hilaire, 
shopped and visited .with friends in 
this city on Tuesday between trains. 
Miss Elizabeth .Tohnshn returned 
to St. Hilaire Tuesday afternoon after 
spending a few days in this city visit- 
ing with Mrs. James Smith. 

Herman Ankre returned to this 
city Tuesday after spending a period 
of two weeks at Baudette. 

Miss Then Haugen. (if Gatzke, was 
among the out' of town shoppers in 
this city on Tuesday. 

Rev. and Mrs. E: Rl Weeks and 
daughter, Doris, arrived Tuesday 
evening from Grove City, and will 
be tile - guests of the formers parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Wf cells. 

II. Ellis, of T.oma, N. D., was in 
This city Tuesday attcniling-to busi- 
aess matters. j 

Dr. I'.iuns. of Minneapolis, who 
is a stale health officer, spent Tues- 
day in this city conferring with mem- 
bers of :he board of health. 

Mrs. (I. A. Cerinundj-on of Plum- 
mer was in this city Wednesday to 
consult physicians and; to shop. 

Miss Jeiisie Rankin, of Iladger. who 

has been visiting with her sister, 

Mis. I-:. S. Rankin-, of Mahnomen, 

.visited Tuesday with friends in this 

eit'y. 'j 

Mrs.. II. F. Hanson, *>f St. Hilaire. 
was among the out of town shoppers 
hi this city on Tuesday. 
„ K. Jorde-dinugen, of Goodridge, 
who has been confined! to the Physi- 
cians hospital of this jcity for some 
time, was discharged! Tuesday and 
returned to his home. > 

Andrew Hrieland. of St. Hilaire, 
was in this city Wednesday attendiag 
to business matters. ] 

Mrs. G. Evenson, of Krntka, visit- 
ed with friends and relatives in this 
city on Tuesday. 

C. Engen and son, Harry, of Ho'.t, 
were business visitors in this city 
Tuesday. j - 

Mrs. Nomland. of St. Hilaire, shop- 
ped and visited withj friends and 
relatives in this ety between trains 
Tuesday. j 

. Mrs. Hagund. of I Cannon Falls 
spent two days the past week in this 
- eity attending to matters- of business. 
Mrs. llornhnrdson. !of Strandtiiiist, 
spent a few days in this city the. past 
week shopping and i visitng with 
friends and relatives, j . . " 

Mrs. Strand left Wednesday morn- 
ing for Roseau, where she will spend 
an indefinite period 
Jriends and relatives. 
Mrs. J. O. Jeviie 
honie in Stratlieona 
morning after spending a few days 
in this city visiting *yith friends. 

Mrs. R. D. Meadows left Wcdnes 
day morning for Middle River where 
she will visit for a few days at the 
A B. Isaacson home.' 

Miss Margaret ! Eichhanimer, who 
has been visiting for the past week 
at her home in Grand Farks, returned 
to this, city Wednesday mornngi 

Captain Allen! of! the 16th Field 

Artillery of the .4th! Division, which 

is now.statoned at! Camp Dodge, 

visited with Sergeant Vance B. 

. Hunter between .trains Tuesday. The 

4th Division will leave shortly for 

Camp Lewis, Washington, where 

they will be stationed permanently. 

' According to Cant. Allen the fact that 

the divisou will i be- stationed in the 

west has bee a great inducement in 

the procuring of enlistments. As the 

• territory around; the camp is noted 

' for its_hunting and- fishing districts, 

the recreational advantages are vast. 

ly different frOni thbse offered in this 

part of the country. The Captain 

says that at least! fifty men from 

Minnesota have enlisted in : this 

division in the 'i st month. 

Miss Gertrude Conklin- returned 
to this city Wednesday evening, after 
speding the , day in 1 Plnewpod Visit- 
ing with friends 



arrived 
spend two 



sister, 'Mrs* Anton Kosy>jid. 



Tweten and daughters left 

norning ftr Middle River 

the John Oiberg home for 

weeks. 

Sandstrom and daughters 



Mrs. H. 
Thursday 
to visit at 
about two 

Mrs. \ r . 
of this ciiy left Thursday; niorning: 
for Baude to where she will spend 
an indeflnie period visiting with her 
brothers. 

Mrs. Wl P. Davis and children, 
who have been visiting at various 
points in the southern part of the 
state, and who have spent a few 
days in his city visiting with 
friends returned to .their home in 
Roosovelt Thursday. 

Miss Gertrude. Holm, who has 
been visiting at the Louis Nelson 
home in this city " for the. past few 
days retu ned to her home in Ro- 
seau Thur iday morning. 

Mrs. Ri y Thuse left this city 
Thursday norning for Gatzke, where 
she will m flke her future home. 

Mrs. Jt mes Fnrr, Jr., and little 
son returi ed Thursday from Grand 
Forks win re they have been .visiting 
for the pa -t week. 

Perl M; bey and family returned 
to this ei y Wednesday from Lake 
City whet ? they have been visiting 
for the p ist three weeks. They 



entire trip in their Frank- 



A. Sapero 



THE TRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JULY 30, 1920 



this city Wednesday to 
weeks visiting with her 



B. W. Briggs of Clarion, la., ar-l gus, Minn. 39-tf 

rived in this.city Thursday •morning [FOR SALE— THRESHING OUTFIT 



made the 
lin sedan. 

Mr. am Mrs. B. E. Dahlquist left 
Wednesda ,- by car for Alexandria 
where the r will visit for a short 
period; I rom there they will con- 
tinue to 3 [inneapolis. 

Miss Hi zel Sapero arrived in this 
city Wedi esday evening to spend a 
period of hree weeks visiting at the 



to spend a few days as guest of 
R. B. .McWilllains. ■' . , j 

Geo. Hendei ... motored here from 
Minneapolis Thursday morning and 
will spend a few days as the 'guest 
of C. Halvorson and daughter, Ruby. 

Misses Gena and Helga Satre. of 
Grafton, N.D., spent Sunday visit- 
ing with friends in this city. 

Mr. and Mrs: Harold Page Miller, 
formerly "of this city, motored over 
from Crookston Tuesday to join the 
tourists, who went to Wnrroad to 
boost the Pennington County Fair. : 

Dr. Sommerfelt, of Greenbush, was 
in this city Wednesday attending to : 
business matters. 

Mrs. Oscar Fe'.lman, of St. Hi- 
laire, was among the out of town 
shoppers in this city Thursday. 



home. 



Classified Wants 



PAINTING AND PAPERHANGING, 
and interior decorating. First 
class work. Prices reasonable. — 
Bakken & Sherstad. Phones 5942 
or 413 tf. 

WANTED— GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Mrs. M: T. McFarland, 
30T Knight ave'. N. 38-tf 

FOR RENT — ONE FURNISHED 
room. Telephone 515. 39-2pd 

FOR SALE— GOOD TEAM AND 
harness. Reasonable price. Cafl 
Mrs. J. J. Amble, 933 Horace ave- 
nue North, 2t 

LOST — 27 HEAD OF EWES, ONE 
buck and 20 lanbs. Lambs all have 
Jong tails and weigh from 75 to 
100 pounds. Ewes all have black 
face. Notify W. G Hamrlck, An- 



confplete for work. Reeves engine 
and Reeves separator 36-60 with 
garden city wing feeder. Engine 

-s/is ■ a {40-80 gas tractor with 400 
•'"gallon gas tank '« tount'ed on "truck*, 

..; 8 bottom stuble plows, also brack- 
ers, a good, outfit for someone that 
wants to go threshing. For par- 
ticulars write or call on me. B. J. 

. Bakke. Thief River Fai's, Minn. 

FOR RENT -i- IMPROVED FARM 
near town. M. C. Harlow. 40-tf 

LOS T — MAROON AND GOLD 

sweater bjetween Oen store and 

, Red Lake Elevator. Leave at this 

office. 40-1 

FOUND — SIDE CURTAIN' FROM 
big car on Jefferson highway in 
. city. Owner may have same by 
paying for this add and. calling at 
524 Riverside ave. and describing 
property. tf 

HAY STUMPAGE OX SEVERAL 
quarters near Goodridge for rent. | 
First & Peoples State Sink 85-tf 



T|he Lyceum^ 

SATURDAY 

Jess Willard in 

"The Challenge of Chance" 

A Superman in a Super-Picture 
CENTURY COMEDY, Matinee at 2:30 

SUNDAY and MONDAY 
William Frnum in 
"The Adventurer" 

A rot lantic drama with thrill and dash — with a love story of 
u)ond rous charms. And another one of those fast moving 
SU WHINE COMEDIES: Matinee Sunhay at 2:30. 
DON'T MISS THIS TREAT 



The Princess^ 



USED CARS FOR SALE 

Buick Modal C. 25., overhauled, 
repainted and new cord tires $700. 

Ford, late model, equipped with 
shock absorber and Yale lock $450. 
Marion delivery car, sacrifice price 
?300. Empire Speedster, 5 wire 
wheeVs, new tires, a sacrifice at $800. 

Staude tractor attachment for 
Ford. Brand new, pulls two plows 
this attachment sells for ?230. Our 
price for quick sale $130.00. . 

Overland 75. Overhauled, new 
batteries and a bargain at $475.00. 
Studebaker '6, overhauled 1917 mod- 
el. Car traveled less than 600 miles 
$875. 

These cars can be seen at the E. 
C. Parsons Auto Co., Warren, Minn, 



TaKe JVoticef 



Ail business houses! in Thief River Falls, members of 
the undersigned association, will be closed from 12 o'clock 
noon to 6 o'clock p. m. on 



Thursday, Aug list 5th 



This is the second day of the Pennington County 
Fair and this rule is made in order to . give proprietors and 
clerks an opportunity to see the show. 



' THE STORES WILL OPEN 
TO ACCOMODATE THE PUBLIC. 



AGAIN AT 6 O'CLOCK 



Thief River Falls 
Merchants -A.i\r'n. 



Meet Us at The Fair 



SUNDAY and MONDAY • 

Henry Lehrman presents 
'A TWILIGHT BABY" 

{fetter than a third of a week in a 2.75 nursery. Jl 
distinctive. comedy creation, unlike anything you have ever 
seen iefore; and of higher class. A First-National Scenic 
Jl yaramount-Jlrtcraft . Magazine — A First ZNjalional 
Attraction. 



visiting with 

returned to her 
on Wednesday 



Notice to 
Property Owners 










A 



Notice is hereby give n to all owners of J pro- 
perty abutting on all "alleys [and streets~of 
the city, to cut ajid remove all obnoxious 
weeds upon their half of such streets and 
alleys. . ' v 

If such weeds are not removed within]reason- 
able time from the date of this notice, pro- 
ceedings will be taken at law whereby such 
obnoxious weeds will be removed by city 
authorities and the expense thereof charged 
against the abutting property. 



O/L, BARKEN 

StreetTConimissioner 

■■■■■■, .'•-?■ ; ' Jj -f -, ,■; ;i,vs-. :■:■■■■ ..'.." 



We are going to hold an actual 
demonstration of "The National" 
Shock Loader at The Pennington 
Co. Fair, August 4-6, and will ap- 
preciate to have you look us up. 
If any of you are interested in our 
proposition, "we'll be pleased to 
have you give us your name and 
address then. 

Should any of you farmers or 
threshermen wish us to ; assist you 
free of charge with "Th6 National" . 
Shock Loader in your threshing or 
stacking operations, kindly tell us 
about it at the Fair. 

For further information call 



C. H. HERMECKE and W. D. O'BRIEN 

at The Evelyn Hotel 
THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA 



NATIONAL SHOCK-LOADER CO. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 



>!*i;;yv 



" -^.''ir^fe.c-*^' 







Wr 



The Tribune Has The Largest 
Circulation in The Trade Terri- 
tory Adjacent to Thief River 
Falls of AnyjNewspaper publish- 
ed in all of Pennington County 



•^T-^K"*' :. 



'■!».■ 





SK..- 



.1. 



^IrttflG*^ The Tribune Has The Largest 
"A» T 7,Ictt Circulation ,in The Trade Terri- 
"aOv** tory Adjacent to Thief Rive 
Falls of Any Newspaper publish- 
ed in all of Pennington County 



VOL 20 N6..42 



THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 1920 



Official Paper of 'Pennington County 



■■■■«' 



,«r? 



M0VEiT0i ,r 3 
iiUME 




<*? 



SATURDAY 



& 



FIRST AND PEOPLES BANK TO 

OCCUPY MODERN BANKING 

HOME SOON 



The First and 1 Peoples' State bank 
will move to their, new banking home 
next Saturday, located in the building 
-recently, purchased by them and fit- 
ted into one of | the choice banking 
houses of the city. The new .location. 
Is in the Scantlia block directly 
across the stieet! from their present 
location. j 

The new home of. the First and 
Peoples is one that the city can point 
to with pride. JThe Interior is fin- 
ished with mahogany furniture and 
fixtures and gives the place a rich 
appearance. This bank also has one 
of the thickest land strongest vault 
•doors in the entire northwest and 
have a safety ^deposit department 
second to none The 'lobby is finished 
•with Lavandn and Veined Tennessee 
marble and the (front with Bedford 
'stone. All thru the establishment 
presents a neat and rich appearance 
•and Is designed ifor convenience and 
accuracy. j ._ ' 

A directors' room is arranged for 
in the rear of the building and a spe- 
cial feature -is the room that is pro- 
vided for the adding machines, which 
will criminate much noise from the 
bank proper. The entire plan is 
founded on efficiency and promptness! 
and is one of 'the ne?t and attractive 
show place;; in the northwest. j 

The bank will be open Saturday 
for the reception of visitors, and the 
officers and directors will he on hand 
to attend to every want and to sec 
that all visitors are conducted thru 
the establishment. Special music 
has been arranged for from four in 
the afternoon until nine in the ever 
■ning and souvenirs for all visitors 
have been arranged for. 

The history of this hank shows a 
phenominal growth and the officers 
and directors can point with pride 
to the record established." The First 
State ban'.; was : organized in 1S92 
with a capital Of of $10,000. The 
Heoi/fcst bank jwas established in 
1900 'with a ! capital of §30,000. On 
December 17th, jtho two banks con- 
solidated under'] the present name 
with a capita) arid surplus of ?90,000 
making it one oil the oldest banks in 
the county, i ;• 

.The reccndj maintained by the two 
banks previous to the consolidation 
has carefully) been held, to with the 
result that that' the. present iusti- 
tution today stands among the strong 
and reliable banking bouses of thp 
northwest anil is a credit to the en- 
tire county. ; • 



FASTEST BALL 
GAME OF YEAR 
LASTSUNDAY 

GONVICK TEAM PROVES A Bit 

TOO MUCH FOE LOCALS^ 

SCORE 7 TO 5 



ST. HILAIRE DAY 

Tomorrow will be St. Hi- 
re day at the Pennington 
unfy Fair. Fifty autonio- 
es wA'l arrive in this city 
im' St. Hilnire and will 
i-adc around the track at 
20. .Each car will be, 
:ornted with banners 
ring the proper booster 
'it and this day is to be 
led over absolutely to the 
isiitors from St. Hilaire.' 
E\ ery resident of this city is 
asged to extend the, glad 
of fellowship to the 
visitors from St. Hilaire to- 



la. 
C( 
hi 
fn 
Pi 
.1 
de 

sh >w 
sp r 
tuiri 



D. CHRISTENSEN 
MEETS DEATH 
SATURDAY 



One [of the cleanest and hottest 
ball games of the senSoii was played 
at the {Fair Grounds last Sunday af- 
ternoon when the local team met the 
Gonvick aggregation. The game was 
bitteifjj contested from start to fin- 
ish, but the Gonvick team had the 
advantage all the way thru the 
game and when the final ining was 
over the score board showed a total 
of fivelfor Thief River arfd seven for 
Gonvick. 

The woik of George as pitcher 
was marvellous and reflects much 
credit 'on his ability. Hg apparently 
had the Gonviek team at' his mercy 
til) thru Che game and with his won- 
derful whip easily retired them when 
it became necessary and the game 
looked I tight. 

Lawrence played a good, fast game 
as also] did George at short. Jonas 
at third also played a good game 
and handled his end of the game 
from start to finish in a manner that 
would jdo credit to a professional- 

The I locals play Gonvick at that 
pace next Sunday and it is more 
titan likely there ■ will be several 
rooters; from-this city accompany ac- 
company the team to that town for 
the filial show -down. Several big 
games t have been booked for the 
near future and the city is to see a 
wonderful exhibition of. the national 
pastime in the immediate future. The 
local team are p'laying some real 
baseball arid are deserving: of better 
support. Ttfey^have outplayed their 
opponents all the way thru the 
season and have shown marked ability 
as compared with other teams that 
'hove played here. The Gonvick team 
was c( mpbsed mostly of salared men 
and tl ey came loadod for the local 
organisation. The result was not 
exactl; ■ as this city would have had 
it but nevertheless it was without 
question one of the cleanest and best 
games played on the local diamond 
this y -ar. 



Over 23.00 New Names Added To CirculatioivList, Giving 
The Tribune The Largest Circulation in 
; Pennington County 



Saturday u'ght, July 31st, at eight 
o'clock, the greatest automobile 
prize campaign for", worth-while 
prizes' ever conducted in northern 
Minnesota came to an end. 

And today are announced the! win- 
ners of the great prize race, as de- 
cided by the judges, after : careful 
checking and tabulation of all the 
automobile campaign records and 
vote t- tails. 

Mrs. Edward Singer, of Erie, was 
announced as winner of the first 
prize, a Buick "Six" five passenger 
touring car, costing $1,790. No more 
luxurious or sturdy automobile could 
ha vi been obtained as a prize for 
awaning in this greatcampaign— antf, 
there Is not a person in the territory 
who d6es not heartily congratulate 
Mrs Siuger s upon her wonderful vic- 
tory. 

This prize was |Won iby afcljual 
merit, conscientious application and 
continual effort. Mrs. Singer started 
in the race late in the game, but de- 
termined to make up for this 'late 
start by working harder than ever— - 
and did so. From the day she en- 
tered the race until the last day of 
the great prize race, she did not 
lag for one moment. 

It is true that there were times 
when the issue was in great doubt — 
v. hen she herself was discouraged and 
dishentrteed. But- -and this more 
Minn anything e/se shows the true 
genius of the reril worker — She kept 
on in spite of every discouragement—' 
and won. 

Tlie. car, which was purchased 
from the Peoples Auto Company of 
this city was delivered to Mrs. Sing- 
er immediately at the ollose. 

The winner of the second grand 
prize, the Overland "Four" touring 
car was Guilder Tviet, of Golden 
VnJey. This automobile, wJiich re 
tails at ?1,090, is one of the sturdiest 
and most dependable light cars on 



■Excellent Photograph 

Klsewhc're in this Issue of The 
Tnlbuue \v .il.be found a photograph 
of tlie sweet clover field of Chas. 
Kittleson. This field of thirty-live 
acres represent: a small fortune in 
itself as it is estimated that there 
w>>1 he a yield of from $7.00.0 to j 
?0.000 in seed. In addition the. soil ! 
is improved to a great extent and in- ! 
n'oculated for the production of larger! 
and botler crops of other grain. There' 
are several small acreages of sweet I 
clover in the county this year and! 
there will be more next year. Pen- j 
nington' county is due soon to be j 
classed as the leading sweet clover ! 
county in Minnesota. — and more than ; 



COUNTY CENSUS 
RETURNS SHOW 
LARGE INCREASE 



RETURN'S RECEIVED BY COINTY 

AUDITOR ANDERSON ARE 

HIGHLY PLEASING 



FAIR OPENS 
TOMORROW IN 



/, 



FULL FORCE 



EXCELLENT LINE OF ATTRACT- 
IONS SECURED AND FAIR 
TO BE A HUMMER 



the market. Evolved as a compromise | fair and the competition clean. 



between the speed and strength of the 
heavy automobile and the lightness 
and flexibility of the small car, it is j i.kely the whole United States. 

a ■ wonderful automobile — one of { ^ 

which the winner can be more than ' 
proud. 

Mr. Tviet .was an early entry — one 
of the first to start work. But. 
real Iy the. fact of an early entry had 
li-tie to do with lis victory. 

Following these two grand prizes, 
which totaled in value nearly !?3,000 
there awarded district prizes. . 

In the first district O. L. Cronstrom 
of tills city, takes first prize ?125 in 
gold. 

The second disriet prize, ?75 in 
gold was taken by Mrs. Edwin O. 
Erickson of this city. 

Of the other endidates in this 
city, district number one, to take 
cash prizes, Harry Lund took the 
third prize of $05 in gold; Mrs. T. J. 
Rowan, te fourth of $50 in gold ; and 
Robert Halvorson, the fifth of ?25 
in gdlcl. 

* Miss Sylvia Pierson of St. Hilaire, 
Is winner of the first second district 
ririze; 

Miss Martha Albin wins the sec- 
ond prize of $75 in casti. 

And The Tribune feels that con- 
gratulations is due — for tlie handling 
of, tlie campaign makes a record to be 
proud of. But ther^ are even greater 
and more earnest coiigatulations due 
the workers in the campaign, who 
put up. from first to Inst, a clean 
fight, an honest fight and a fight 
worth watching. To those workers 
who failed to win, the management 
of The Tribune caii but say — "Better 
luck next time." It was not the. 
f..ult of the contestants that .they did 
not win — it was the' fault' of Hie. 
terribly strong competition engender- 
ed by those, who are today announced 
■as winners. Competition there was 
. — hot eomptition find hot rivalry and 
hot. fighting. But the fighting was 



; The census returns for tins i 
I just, completed have l*>cn re 
| by County Auditor Anderson 
| show an increase of near 
thousand over the census of 
The present census shov 
t'oa of 12.001 a again*' 



>:mty 

eived 

and 

three 

of 1010. 

a popula- 

9.370 in 



due 
ic fair 
heV- 



: HORSE HE WAS RIDING. FALLS, 
CRUSHING OUT HIS LIFE- 
DIED SUNDAY 



Good Boosters 



ST. P AUL BOOSTERS ARRIVE IN 
FULL FORCE LAST SATUR- 
DAY MORNING 



I A_ 



Daii Christenion, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Carstani Christenson, living four 
miles northw'estj of this city, met a 
tragic death ] Saturday evening near 
the city limits j when the horse he 
vas riding sturabled and fell upon 
jm, crushing: him so badly that he 
-died the following day. 

As near as can be found out, Dan 
. who had started to town horseback, 
started ratting jwith an automobile 
and when near j the Great Northern 
tracks, the horse stumbled and fell,- 
crushing thej rider. The lad was 
taken to the; hospital at once where 
e was given* medical attention, nut 
•due to the fact that he was. bleeding 
. internally it! was hard to ' do -any- 
thing for him. j Sunday afternoon at 
three o'clock; he died from, hemmor- 
age of the stoiriacn. During all his 
suffring from ,t|he time he was In- 
jured, the boy never lost- conscious- 
ness and until he died was fully con- 
scious of all that was going on 
around him.! I 

Very fewi outward injuries were 
apparent. The bone in the nose was 
broken and it is thought the skull 
was crushed high up, but despite th'is 
he remained conscious until the end. 
The deceased was twenty-three 
years of ago ! at tin! time of his death 
and was single, making his home 
with his parents. Hi's untimely death 
.is a severe shock to 'his family and 
many friends thruout this commun- 
ity. The sympathy of' all Is extended 
the family in their great -loss. , [ 

Funeral sexv.ces "Will be held to- 
morrow nfierioon arid Interment 
. made in. Greenwood cemetery. j ' 



WANTED-4-HOUSES TO BENT. 



Apply P; 



J. Bottem. 



Zi±6i£ 



—^kiitaii 



i,&:&:.iriJ-zMk 



SUNDAY PROVES 
TOBEABADDAY 
FORAUTOISTS 



CARS UPSIDE DOWN IN EVERY 
DIRECTION AND IN EVERY • 
AVAILABLE DITCH 



Tlie St. Paul manufacturers and 
jobbeis on their boosting tour thru 
the m rthwest arived in tnis city last 
Saturday morn,ing exactly on sched- 
ule tune and were greeted with a 
large representation of citizens, of the 
surroi nding community. The boost- 
ers w sre unanimous in their expres- 
sion hat this city was the banner 
of th( m all In . hospitality. The en- 
fertal iment committee jind provided 
auton obiles for those who cared to 
use tl em and the boosters were shown 
the ci iy and much of the surrounding 
count :y as the time would al?6w. 

Th i Minnesota State Band, which 
accon panied the party, gave a splen- 
did c incert on the streets and -made 
a hit with . everyone. Community 
singh g was also a part of the pro- 
gram and the children of the city 
turne I to with a will and helped put 
the p #gram over In great shape. 

Se era! talks were made by mem- 
bers rf the party and much praise 
was liven the city for its appearance 
and t iddent booster spirit. The mem- 
bers ivlio could find the time, called 
on ci stomers and made new. friends 
and Injoyed themselves generally. 
Eyer; one was happy, fujl of good 
oheerl and the city Is much better oft 
f or t le visit of the" boosters. They 
will find the latch String out any 
time they wish to return and Thiet 
Rlvei Falls wil do her best to prove 
to tl e outside world that she has a 
bunc i of boosters rig4t here at home 
that caii handle thejrS end of the 
prog am when it conies to anything 
in th ^boosting line, i 



t P. O'NEILL IS 
RE-APPOINTED 

TOGRAINBOARD 



APPOINTMENT BY GOVERNOR IS 

FOR A THREE YEAR 

PERIOD 



WOI LD LIKE TO BUY SECOND 
ho id' baby earrlageiin good' eon'di,-, 
ticji.: Box 1054; " 

" r 



Sunday seemed to be a bad day 
for.autoists in this vicinity as several 
care found lodging in the -ditch and 
but for the timely arrival of aid 
there would be several severe cases 
to report. 

George Clirlsto went into the ditch 
at the junction two miles nortli of 
the city. , He was accompanied by 
three of his children and James Rut> 
loff. The reason for the accident is 
given as the result of the front 
wheels catching in the track, be- 
tween the boards that are put down 
at the crossing, and the rail, and in 
swinging the car out of the groove 
he shot off to one side of the road 
and almost went into the ditch. In 
attempting to avoid going into the 
ditch the car was sw'ung quickly back 
the other way with the result the car 
landed on the opposite side of the 
road^ bottom side Up. Rutloff was 
pinned 'under te car for a matter of 
fifteen minutes until help came atong 
and the car was lifted off him. The 
three small children of Mr. Clirlsto 
and himself were fortunately thrown 
clear of the car and escaped without 
injury. Mr. KuKoff also got Off 
luckily with a bruised shoulder and 
a. scratched face. The car was 
damaged butt -little the wind shield 
suffering the majority of the damage. 
Lars Buck and nephew who re- 
side east of Goodridge, also had', a 
severe upset when the Ford car they 
were -driving on the state road 
fourteen miles east of the city took 
tht;e..dltch arid ended bottom side up 
Wiith both occupants pinned under- 
neath. Gust Gulseth, of the Ram- 
beckrSrone company of this city hap- 
.pened a^ong and noticed the prdlca- 
ment the men were in and lifted the 
car off the nephew and then propped 
the- car up against the bank with a 
board long enough to get Mr! Buck 
out. The worst injured qf the two 
was Mr. Buck and he seemed to be 
unconscious of 'where he was or what 
had happened when he was pulled 
from under the car. When asked t If 
he was hurt; no Infornjation of a defi- 
nite nature was received and. he was 
placed in an automobile headed this, 
was* tiria taken to this city where he 
.-vaA;io^d' : '.t&ibie'.'.ftt,']8oad'-8haBe > 'ahd 
Teturn0dH6;:.hisehoine.' •• f -• 



D. 'I'. O'Neill was re-appointed as 
a member of the Grain Appeals 
Board by Governor Burnquist. last 
week for a term of three years. Mr. 
O'Neill was first appointed to serve 
the unexpired term of N. J. Holm- 
berg when the ilatter was appointed 
state commissioner, of agriculture. 
Tlie Minneapolis Tribune gives the. 
following account of tlie appoint- 
ments : 

"Louis Hanson of Ada was ap- 
pointed a member of the Duluth 
State Board of Grain Appeals late 
.yesterday by "Governor Burnquist. 
He will succeed J. F. Ingeroll 
whose term expired. Former Senator 



DrP.'o'Neillof Thief River Fails has the parachute drop his 



Tomorrow the big Pennington 
County Fair opens its gates to what 
no doubt will be one of the largest 
crowds that has so far attended the 
fair. Everything is in readiness and 
it now looks as tho this was to be 
the banner fair of all years.. Visit- 
ors from all sections are planning 
on attending the fair and from every 
indication there is certain to lie tlie 
largest attendance on record 

One bad feature that cannot he 
overcome is ihe fact that one of the 
Hying stunts arranged for by the 
fair hoard has been cancelled 
to a sninshup of panes. The 
board received a wire that th 
traction of tlie Minneapolis New 
which was to appear here is called i 
off and cannot make the. fair. Other' 
attractions however have been se- 
cured to" take the place of this at- 
traction and in view of tlie fact that 
the. attraction of Art Williams who 
does all that anyone could he asked 
to do in connection with furnishing 
thrilers from an alrpane. In ad- 
dition tlie fair board have seeded tlie. 
great Sigfried. who holds the cham- 
pionship as a ski juniper and who is 
reputed to. he Jhe only man giving 
this exhibition. . Itraiu-el & Dog, i hist 
s-'ack wire artists have also been se- ', s ,. v , 
cured for the fair and they guarantee \ r,,r 
to furnish more fun and amusement ' t [ r ,.\ 
to the square, inch than any other at- ! ^ t , n 
traction that lias ever been given in ' ,[oh 
tlie county|. The Savages, who per- ,■„. 
form on the mechanical revolving 
ladder, are. also coming and these 
peoK'e also stand high in their 
chosen line of work. 

Additional attractions in tlie form 
of wild west performances have been 
booked and include the best that the 
Pat Houiet Company linvw to offe^r' 
in this line. Bucking, rope throwing, 
fancy and trick riding are some of 
the stunts this cusniinny pull off. 
They also will have a free' for all 
bucking contest for special prizes. 
In addition. Pat Houiet. hd'dcr of 
Western championship for bulldog- 
ging. wi'l put. on an exhibition of that 
darng western sport 'whore man con- 
tests with a steer, throwing the 
animal bv sheer strength and holding 
him heirless. This Is considered one. 
of the biggest features of all Western 
roundups and will no doubt attract 
a lnrg crowd* 

The International ITying Circus 
have wired the fair board that it can 
furnish 'a wing walker to take the 
place of Lieut. Larrabee of the F.ly- 
ing Circus and while he does not-rto 
work on the 



1010. or a gain of 2.71". ov-;r the re- 
turns of 1010. The reports by town 
ships and incorporated district 
follows: 

Black River township 

Bray township 

Clover Loaf township 

Dear Park township' 

Goodridge township 

Goodridge village T 

Hickory township 

Highlnndiitg township 

Kratka township 

May field township 

Xordon township 

North township 

N'umedal township 

I'olk Centre township 

Reiner township . .' 

Iliver I-'ai|s township 

Ho 1 . ksbury township 

St. Hilaire village 

Silvoiton township 

Smiley township 

Star township 

Thief Kiver Falls, eity 

Wyandoue township 

Incorporated Places 

(ioirdridge. village 

St. Hilaire. village 

i Thief Iliver Falls, i-hv ..'... 



is-as 

100 
I0:i 

2-ir 

300' ' 
130 

.2:11 

300 

t-.;7 

373 
214 
333 
7-b0 

1 13 
1S.7 
300 

000 
310 

2 SO 
124' 
■100 

i.osr. 

230 



2 10 
l-OS.-i 



New Citizens 



RESULT OF EXAMINATION LAST 
FRIDAY INCREASES CITI- 
ZENSHIP BY NINE 



r 



Nine lu'\y_ e::izeii> \v:i- th> 
I' the hearing held mi I'm- i-i.iii 
Friday, two were s,,|,li ( 
n i-vilians. Tho-i- ivl:-i 
naturalization ^ipi-r- an 
u'eil i-ilizens are Kjoirat' 
Iloyslaiel. of Eric: lb 



•I's 



III 



ity. wh 



to 



bid. 

NeV: 



aligi- !u nan 
mil whirh |)rli!i.i;i v.':. 
Lauriil Xeilson : Hans II 
son. eiiy ; I labor i ilson Ky.-n 
.lames Toill'iir. i-'ty : Scvorl .!■ 
Erie: I'odcr Salio. Kratlia; 
Jacob (ulen. city: 

There Were si-voiTi otle-l- 
that were up for de'-isio 
we're'maiiy matters to In 
consideration and several «!•• 
be. attended to lliat the i-oiut 
have the time to look after ai 
were continued until a Ian 
when the court deci'led to li 
other examination. 



applied 
nl wore 
Tarj.-rs- 
Ki-is: : :m 
•!il ioatvl 

i.. Ilns- 
•_M'.-inir<J. 



i:i- 



l.m there 
:■ Icon into 
il.-.aib to 
li.i not 
ii they 
r .late. 
.1.1 an- 



In Woman's Sphere 

.Grand UnpiK Mi.liiuan. 

first po'ii-c woman 



Watts. Ca. if. 
looted two lo one 
r a recent ele.-ti. 
roman ohy e'erk. 



is 



u'onian r.iayor, 

r h.-r opponent 

Ii also lias a 



been reappointed On the Minneapolis 
State Board of Grain Appeals. He 
was first: named to serve the unex- 
pired portion of ' the- term of N. J. 
Hplmberg of Renville, when ihe lat- 
ter was appointed state commissioner 
of agricuture, . Other appointments 
made by the governor were Vernon 
Gates, Rochester attorney, to succeed 
Judge Theodore Sehacht, resigned, 
and Nicholas B. Moran, Crooksfou 
attorney, as judge of the municipal 
court in that city, filling a vacancy 
caused by the recent death of Judge 
L. E. Gossman." 



-'r,-^^'yi L ij.7.rXy 



Auto Races at Fair 

At the last minute the fair board 
Tiave arranged for auto races on the 
-last day of the fair, Friday. Tlie 
races will be free for all arid a sub- 
stantial purre has been provided for 
the winners.. Any and everyone may 
enter these races, whether they are 
•local rsiderits or. from a distance. 
There' have ben six outside cars en- 
tered for these races, among them be- 
ing two cars from tWnnipeg; one car 
from Bemidji, one ear from Hallock, 
one car from Grookston and one car 
from Grand Forks. 

In addition to the auto races on 
the last day, the fair board announce 
there w IM be motorcycle races each 
day of the fair, starting I with the 
first day and continuing to the close. 
Some excepionally e'ever racers have 
been signed up. for the motor cycle 
races: and it is expected that these 
races wjl be-, we'.U worth jwltnessing. 



^smy-A 



wings is said to be of the highest 
order and full of thrills. 

The booths in the Auditorium are 
praeticallv complete and the displays 
of the local merchants are unique 
and attractive. There are fifteen 
booths to be occupied by the local 
mrchants and some have secured 
faetorv demonstrators to lie here 
during the fair demonstrating their 
various products. 

The art exhibit will also be 
Jioused in the Auditorium and tickets 
lor the fair grounds also admit to the 
auditorium without extra cost. The 
exhibits in this department are of 
the highest order and everyone; should 
make it a point to visit the Auditor- 
ium bfore the fair ends.. 

Anderson-Ostmoe . 

Pearme J. Audeison and Tillie A. 
Ostmoe, of this city, were united to- 
gether as husband and wife Thurs- 
day evening at the Zion Lutheran 
parsonage, Rev. Geo. Larson offici- 
ating in the presence of Arthur Ost- 
moe a brother of tho bride and Linda 
Anderson a sister of the bridegroom. 
Their many friends in Thief River. 
Falls extend hearty congratulations. 



Can What You Can 

With raw products high, sugar 
high, and labor high, canned pro- 
ducts will be high this coming win- 
ter. Id behooves every housewife, to 
can all the fruit and vegetables she 
is able to get hold of. If sugar is not 
available, can without sugar and add 
It' when.: the; can, Is opened. 



BEATS ALL RECORDS 

The Tribune in announc- 
ing in tile last issue that the 
tomatoes grown by Henry 
lladrath of this City are the 
first to be produced this early 
in tlie season, finds that, the 
statement is misleading and 
is glad to report that Mrs. 
S. J. Anderson of 522 lied 
Lako Boulevard, holds the 
record for the earliest ripe 
tomatoes. Mrs. A. ndorson 
states that she picked ripe, 
tomatoes out of her garden 
on July 10th and has been 
picking them every day 
since that time. She is using 
the. variety of tomatoes that 
are hardiest and whioh will 
yield the earliest. She ob- 
tained the seed from Dr. 
GambeV. who managed to 
Crawl under tiie wire a few 
days ahead with early to- 
matoes, and Mrs. Anderson 
has found this variety to le' 
tlie best possible to secure 
and the earliest . grown in 
this section. The Tribune 
Is -glad to make this correc- 
tion and to give the credit 
to whom it belongs. We fc--', 
quite certain ther.' will be 
none claim an earlier record 
than this and that Mrs. An- 
derson holds the undisputed 
.cariipionship of Pennington 
county as the first to gather 
ripe tomatoes from her own 
garden.. > 



! : '•'.■ ■ : •"'• -•''•^•■:'--\'.'-: k '-.i - ;rV--i> < £?'-.:i^:«.-;-'.T^'\'-'' : '' r - "'-'-'':• ' ■'•'• "•* ' 



5&teaa^KgigM^L:ig%A.A 







Page Two 



I&bal tev^s 



t 



! 



Saturday eve- 



Saturday eve- 



. Xorbort Holzkncchfe left Saturday 
evening' f«r Minneap'plis, where lie 
will -visit a brief- iteriod with friends 
and relatives. I 

Miss I-'oronee Brcdeson, who has 
been visit injr with: her sister in Du 
lurh for some time past, returned to 
her home in this city 

Morris Mabey left 
ninjr for Lake City this state where 
he will visit with friends and rel- 
iitivi'-- for one week. ■ 

Eiuil Olson returned to this city 
Saiunlay evening from Xew London 
where he has spent tihe . past few 
day- visiting with: friends and rela 
Stive.--. 

Taul 

with friends in (his city between 
I rains Saturday evening. He left on 
the tlyer for. -Miunwipcp. 

Mi<^ Margaret Jorgenson of Thlm 
mer arrived in this city Saturday 
evening to spend a few days visit- 
ing with friends, j 

M. S. .Tansen left Saturday evening 
for Sherburne. N. :Y M ! where ho will 
spend a period of three weeks visit- 
ing with the H. P.. jIMirdy family:- 
. "Wlien lie .re-urns lie will be-. accom- 
panied by his wife, who has spent 
the. 'past three months in! that place. 

Sergeant Vance B. 
cruiring oflieer. who 
tioncd here for the p 



nyder. of Warren, visited 



short period, 
he discharged 



Hunter, re- 
has been sta- 
ist ten weeks, 
left Sunday evening for Minneapolis. 
All the officers at the -small stations 
are to be called in .during the month 
_of August, as there is small 'chance 
of getting any recruits among the 
farm districts during harvest tinie, 
and more men can he gotten from 
the city alone. A station will most 
likely be reopened in [this city again 
around September first, and it is 
very probable that; the Sergeant will 
be sent. back for a 
Sergeant Hunter will 
from the. army September sixteenth. 

V. C Ko/.io'I and Sidney Burton ar- 
rived in this city Saturday evening 
lo spend the week enjl vsiting with 
friends. j 

Mrs. R. ("J. Cook, accompanied; by 
her sister, Mrs. R. Anderson, who 
has been visiting with her for the 
past week left Saturday morning 
for Roseau, where they will spend 
a week visiting with i friends and 
relatives. ' ■ i 

H. A. P.rnmmiind left Friday eve- 
_jiing for Minneapolis where he will 
spend a few (lays attending to mat- 
ters of business. , ' j 

Leon Stanton, who [has been em- 
ployed with the Lambprt Drug com- 
pany left Friday evening for Green 
Bay. . WK. where he will visit with 



Mr 



!ucr 

i id. 



Con gross m aji 
this city 
will meet 3 
erson is up 
an! old se'rl 
Sunday. I 
vassing in 

Mrs. O.- 
sp^nt the i 
city with 
John Eftcii 
in ; Shelly 
was accoini 
lielja Vign 

Miss Ca 
X jD.. who 
past three 
sftid home 
unlay after 

Mr." and 
been visith 
brief perio( 
in Fresno. 

Mr. anil 
hei-e Frida 
Thompson, 
friends. T 
for Crookst 

Miss Be; 



friends for a time. He' will also go 
to Omro. Wis., before returning to 
this city. 

Mr. and Mrs. C M. Wilson, who 
have been visiting wit i their daugh- 
ter in Lafayi'tte for i'l e past month, 
relumed to this city tie first of the 
—week. • 

Mr. and Mrs. T. ; P. j Anderson and 
family left Friday morning for Wnr- 
road where they will spend the re- 
mainder of the week. | 
_> Hans Chommie h?ft Friday evening 
for Minneapolis where I lie will. spend 
a few days attending tp business. 

Roy Lambert, wlio has been visit- 
ing with Ills mother In Detroit for 
a brief time returned to his home in 
this city Friday evenng. 

Edwin and Clayton Bnkke of "War- 
ren who have been visiting with 
friends and relatives in Bemidji for 
some time, spent Friday in this 
city visiting. j 

Mrs. John Xyhus of this city left 
Saturday morning fori Holt where 
she will attend some [Mission meet- 
ings which are being hef'.d at that 
place. 

Norman Peterson, who was for- 
merly employed in i this city, and 



-Mr. 



THE TRIBUNE 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 192Q 



Steenerson, passed thru 

enjroute to Roseau where he 

Steenerson. Mr. Steen- 

in that district to attend 

s picnic wl\ich was held 

will also do some can- 

his part of the country. 

< :av -Vigness, who . has 

ast two weeks in . this 

parents", Mr. and Mrs. 

returned to her home 

Saturday afternoon. She 

sinied by her niece, Miss 



■ v 



ie E;.lingson of Rugby, 

has been visiting for the 
reeks at the Peter Engel- 

eturned to her home Sat- 

loon. 

Irs. Ed. Olson, who have 

: Chas. Gustafson £or a 
returned to their home 

'al.. on Saturday. 

:rs. G C. Halden motored 

from their home in 

X.. D.. to visit with 

] icy left Saturday evening 

>n * 

lice I'askewitz, who has 



been spending her vacation with her 
parents in this city, returned to 
Fargo, N. D., where she is employed. 

Mrs. Toni. Holson. . of Warren 
spent Saturday in this city visiting: 
with friends and relatives. She left 
in the afternoon for Crookston where 
she will spend -an indefinite period" 
visiting with friends. - 

Misses Marie Ncilson and Irma 
Johnson left Saturday afternoon for 
Crookston where they will visit with 
friends over Sunday. 

Misses Rosella and Grace Carney 
who have spent the past week in this 
city with their sister Mrs. C. W. 
BaVden returned to their home in 
East .Gand Forks Saturday. 

Geo. 'Hemic"], who has been visit- 
ing in this city for a brief period, 
returned to his home in Minneapolis 
Saturday. He was accompanied -by 
Miss Ruby Halvorson, who has been 
visiting for the past two weeks with 
her father in this city. 

Mr. .and Mrs. Oaf Xcset and fam- 
ily Heft Saturday afternoon via auto 
for Erskine to spend the week end 
with the latters parents. 

Miss Dorothy Butler, of "Williams 
was in this city Thursday visiting 
with friends and relatives. 

Miss Stella Michelson of Holt ar- 
rived in this c*ty Tuesday to spend 
a few days with friends and rela- 
tives. - 




When the Worker Loses 



todaj 
has 
of 
the \ 



the 



10 1 



The spirit of efficiency permeates the business life of 
to such an extent that the very pulse .of commerc3 

xperienced a quickening that is noticeable. Yet much 
benefit of efficient business methods is lost through 
rker's inefficiency due to physical inefficiency. i 

A sick worker is a poor workman. He. is a loss to himself 
iges and a loss to his emu oyer in production. Much 
ess is caused not by work or physical unfitness, but 
through the whste of energy caused by faulty nerve 
which so weakens the system that, the body becomes 
sy victim of ailments and diseases. * 

'*'■• successful. Healthy b uiness men know that to suc- 
ceed, to keep up with the strain and demands of the times, 
they must be fit." They must conserve every ounce of their 
onei'iy and power. Many of them have found that they can 
best do this through t 

M THE BETTER WAV TO HEALTH W 



111 W 

si- !<n 
rath 
ae.." 
an e 



who is now assistant 



secretary to 



because it corrects the caiise of faulty nerve action. and per- 
mits Nature to 'bring about the normal distribution of energy. 
Heath arid vigor usually follow. Chiropractic (Ki-Ro-Prak- 
Tic) is drugless. Every one should 'investigate Chiropractic 
becajuse of the greater material benefits to be derived through 
it. 



f.M.Kolberg,D.C. 



Palmer Graduate . 
Over First National Bank 



Phbne 107 



Thief River Falls 



Special 

Machinery Exhibit 

During Fair Days 



Owing; to 
arrange 



the crowded conditions 
or a very special 



at fair grounds we shall 
machinery display at our office 
and warehouse during fa r days. We shall also have some 
bargains and invite you f|o call and look things over. 



:r t./,!, 



C. Gujstaf son 

Implement Dealei s 



» 

— - — i 



& So,n 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 

Branch at Grygla 



Fair Week Special 
at Hicks 



CASINGS AND TUBES 

30x3 1-2, Non Skid Casing, Special S14.33 

30x3, Non Skid Casing, Specials I '. $11.79 

32x3 1-2 Non Skid Casing, Special .'. .{ S1T.32 

34x4 Non Skid Casing, Special _ S24.45 

Heavy Tubes, all sizes, each S2, 

Tail lights, special at 85c. 

Valve Grinding Compound at 19c. 

Parker's Double Action Pump, $1.48. 

Special Handfeorn, $2.95. 

"For-A-Ford"Spark Plugs, regular $1.00 value, special, 59c. 



Ask for Catalog 

HICKS AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

Thief River Falls 



Visit Our Exhibit 

during the 

FAIR 



During fair week we will have an 
exhibit of the famous Buick automo- 
biles and Chevrolet Automobiles and 
an elaborate display of Tractors on the 
ground. Call and see this exhibit while 

attending the fair. An attendant will be in charge at 
all times to answer all questions and give out inform- 
ation regarding this display. 

Visit our Garage on the 
Jefferson Highway 

Peoples Auto Co, 

"The Home of Service" 



.iik £i;^isiiui ^^^-j^k^k^i^im^^^ 



.-,' -.-■ •■;*»- 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, i 9 ao 



Legal Publications 



■^ 



NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 

Seated proposal^ will be received 
at the office of the County Auditor 
of Pennington County, Minnesota, 
nntil 2 o'clock P. M. Aug. 3rd, 1920, 
for the construction of Jobs number 
S0:05, 20:06 and! 20:0.7 consisting 
of the following: I 

Job ; Noi 20:04 
located on State road No. 4 near the 
SE corner of Section '36 Town of 
Sanders, involving the construction of 
One W 04 Standard concrete Box 
Culvert 24 ft. long, involving 
. Re-enforcing steid 1333 lbs. 
Class "A" concrete 22.9 cubic 
yards. I 

2 in. pipe raining 100 lbs 
Job NoJ 30:65 
located on State road No. 4 near the 
SB corner of Seci ion 30, Town of 
Smh'ey consisting if the construction 
or 

One WlOfl Standard concrete Box 
Culvert 24 ft. long, involving 

Rc-enforcing : steel 2093 jbs. ": 
Class "A" concrete 4394 cubic 
yards I 

2 inch pipe railing 200 lbs. 
Job No.! 20:06 
Vocated on State road No. 3 on line 
between Sections 27 and 34; Town 
of Numedal, consisting of the con- 
struction of j 

One W104 Standard concrete Box 
Culvert